Watch Your Step (Bobby Parker song)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
"Watch Your Step"
Single by Bobby Parker
B-side"Steal Your Heart Away"
ReleasedJuly 1961
Format7"
Recorded1961
GenreRhythm and blues
Length2:44
LabelV-Tone
Songwriter(s)Robert Lee Parker
Bobby Parker singles chronology
"Foolish Love"
(1959)
"Watch Your Step"
(1961)
"It's Too Late Darling"
(1963)
"Foolish Love"
(1959)
"Watch Your Step"
(1961)
"It's Too Late Darling"
(1963)

"Watch Your Step" is a song written and recorded in 1961 by rhythm and blues guitarist Bobby Parker. The song spent several weeks in the Billboard Hot 100 chart, peaking at number 51 during the week of July 15, 1961.[1]

Original release[edit]

The song was written by Parker, inspired by Dizzy Gillespie's "Manteca" and Ray Charles' "What'd I Say". Parker said "I started playing [Gillespie's] riff on my guitar and decided to make a blues out of it."[2] The record was released on the V-Tone record label, a small enterprise that had been started in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania by Venton "Buddy" Caldwell.[3]

Influence[edit]

The single was released in the UK, and had influence far beyond its modest commercial success. It was covered by various artists including Adam Faith, Manfred Mann, and The Spencer Davis Group.[2] In particular, its main riff served as the inspiration for several songs by The Beatles, most notably "I Feel Fine" but also others.[4] In The Beatles Anthology, John Lennon said: "'Watch Your Step' is one of my favourite records. The Beatles have used the lick in various forms. The Allman Brothers used the lick straight as it was."[2] The Allman Brothers song he refers to is "One Way Out", originally written and recorded by Elmore James.

Led Zeppelin also used the riff as the basis for their instrumental, "Moby Dick".[5] Also, Ritchie Blackmore from Deep Purple was inspired by this song to compose the riff to "Rat Bat Blue" from Who Do We Think We Are.[citation needed] "I’m Not Talking" by The Yardbirds, "New World Order" (2001) by Gamma Ray and "Tell the Police the Truth" (2008) by Mahjongg are also based on the riff.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Billboard.com Hot 100 archive
  2. ^ a b c Shaheen J. Dibai, "Bobby Parker: The Real Fifth Beatle?", One Note Ahead, 29 March 2007. Retrieved 2 November 2013
  3. ^ Mike Callahan, Dave Edwards, and Patrice Eyries, V-Tone/Len/Palm/Salvador International Album Discography Retrieved 3 November 2013
  4. ^ Allmusic.com: Day Tripper
  5. ^ Bream, Jon, 2008: Whole Lotta Led Zeppelin: The Illustrated History of the Heaviest Band of All Time. Voyageur Press, 288 pp.
  6. ^ Neman, Martin (November 2010). "One Step From The Blues". Record Collectors Magazine, issue 381, November 2010. United Kingdowm: Diamond Publishing Ltd, 140 Wales Farm Road, London W3 6UG. Archived from the original on 11 April 2013. Retrieved 9 February 2017.

External links[edit]