Water Warriors

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Water Warriors
Type Water gun
Company Buzz Bee Toys
Country United States
Availability 2003–Present
Materials Plastic + metal and latex parts
Official website

Water Warriors is a water gun brand owned by Buzz Bee Toys[1] that was created by the company in 2003. The toy line comprises a large variety of pressurized water guns (similar to early Super Soaker blasters),[2] as well as smaller water guns for younger children.[3]

History[edit]

In the 1990s, Larami's Super Soaker was the leading brand of water guns. In 2002, Larami was acquired by Hasbro[4] and subsequently terminated a number of Larami engineers. In 2003, the engineers who had been terminated by Hasbro started a company called Buzz Bee Toys and created the Water Warriors brand.[4]

The "Firefly", "Hornet", "Zzapper", "Wasp", "Lightning" and "Blazer" were the first six types of water guns offered by Buzz Bee Toys.[5] The Firefly, Hornet and Zzapper were standard air pressure water guns, the Wasp was a "piston pumper", and the Blazer and Lightning employed "Hydro-Power", a system that the Buzz Bee Toys engineers invented. Hydro-Power is an alternative to the patented Super Soaker Constant Pressure System (CPS).[4]

Water Gun Designs[edit]

Water Warriors guns have several designs that work in different ways. These include the following:[6]

Squirt guns[edit]

Buzz Bee Toys has made traditional squirt pistols such as the Kwik Grip and Kwik Grip XL. Some of their squirt pistol designs have improved features. These include the Power Shot and Power Squirt.[7]

Piston Pumper[edit]

Piston water guns have been produced for many years.[8] These guns do not have triggers; they are fired simply by pumping. Although this design feature allows them to reload rapidly, piston pumpers tend to have less range and less power than other designs.

Air Pressure (Pressurized Reservoir)[edit]

Originally made popular by the Super Soaker 50,[9][10] pressurized reservoir systems are still common for small water guns. A water gun using this system is pressurized by air being pumped and compressed into its reservoir. When the trigger is pulled, a valve is opened and the compressed air pushes the water out of the nozzle.[11]
Water Warriors started with three pressurized reservoir water guns, and has continued to produce them in various shapes and sizes.

Air Pressure (Separate Chamber)[edit]

This is a more powerful air pressure system that was also first introduced by Super Soaker. It is designed so that that water is pumped from the reservoir into an empty plastic container. As the water is pumped in, the air sitting inside becomes compressed. When the trigger is pulled, the valve opens and the compressed air forces the water out.[11] Although Water Warriors did not use this design for the first several years of production, they did use a variation they referred to as "air-piston" (below). The brand first used separate air pressure in 2009.[12] After being sued by Hasbro, Buzz Bee started taking advantage of air pressure technology[citation needed], releasing the Gorgon,[13] Ultimate Explorer,[14] Colossus,[15] and others.

Hydro-Power[edit]

Hydro-Power was Buzz Bee's equivalent of Super Soaker's Constant Pressure System (CPS).[4] Hydro-Power consists of a flat, circular sheet of rubber (known as a diaphragm) clamped with several bolts onto a disk with a hole in it. Water is pumped into the hole, pressing on the rubber sheet and building up pressure.[11]

In 2009, Buzz Bee Toys started manufacturing water guns with CPS type bladders under the same name of Hydro-Power.[16][17] Because of this, Buzz Bee was sued by Hasbro.

Air Piston[edit]

Air piston was a short-lived variation of air pressure that was made in 2005 under the Aqua Master Pre-Charger lineup.[18] A tube with a piston in it was pressurized with air in the back, pushing the piston to the front. Then the gun was switched to water mode, and water would be pumped in the front, pushing the piston to the back again. This system gave the guns extra pressure, and allowed them to shoot any direction.[19]

Spring-Powered[edit]

Water Warriors has made a variety of spring-powered water guns. The first was the Splat Blaster, which was cocked with a lever action, and fired a small burst of water.[20] Next was the Steady Stream, which was pumped like a piston blaster, but had a spring-loaded pressure chamber behind the nozzle. This gave it a constant stream, and allowed it to continue shooting for a moment after pumping ceased.[21] In 2009, Water Warriors made the Pulse series, a line of pressurized water guns that used spring-loaded pressure chambers.[22]

Motorized[edit]

Water Warriors has produced a few motorized water guns.[23] The first was the Scorpion, which used a motor to automatically pump water into its Hydro-Power pressure chamber.[24] In 2007, they made the Tarantula, which ran entirely off of a motor to fire water.[25] The Tarantula was considered by Popular Mechanics to be "The Best Battery-Powered Gun."[26] They also made the Jet, a smaller and less powerful gun intended for small children.[27]

User feedback[edit]

In relation to its test of four water gun types, Popular Mechanics commented that the Water Warriors Gorgon was "too heavy for even the oldest tester, and the pump-fire was hard to shoot on the run."[28] The criticism was isolated and similar comments have not appeared in other internet reviews.

A consumer perspective on the Water Warriors products was ascertained in a survey of water gun enthusists from WaterWar.net[when?]. All of the enthusiasts who participated in the survey agreed that, although they preferred the appearance of Super Soakers, Water Warriors, at the time of the survey, manufactured the best water guns.[29][citation needed]

Buzz Bee Toys has previously invited selected enthusiasts to its annual meeting in order to assist with effective decision-making.[30]

Lawsuit[edit]

In 2010, Buzz Bee Toys was successfully sued by Hasbro for patent infringement.[31] Hasbro claimed that Buzz Bee Toys infringed on a patent related to its "Super Soaker water toy." Although it is unknown exactly what the dispute was over, it is strongly suggested that Hasbro was suing for the Water Warriors Hydro-Power water guns, which were becoming too similar to Super Soaker's Constant Pressure System. Since then, the Water Warriors line has not contained a single Hydro-Power water gun.[32]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Water Warriors - Buzz Bee Toys Inc. :.". Buzz Bee Toys Inc. :. Buzz Bee Toys Inc. :. Retrieved 19 March 2012. 
  2. ^ "Water Gun / Water Blaster Product Analyses Listings". Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 19 March 2012.  |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
  3. ^ "Water Warriors (kids water blasters)". Water Warriors. Buzz Bee Toys Inc. Retrieved 21 March 2012. 
  4. ^ a b c d "History of the Super Soaker". iSoaker. isoaker.com. Retrieved 19 March 2012.  |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
  5. ^ "Water Warriors Air Pressure Soaker Evolution Tree". Water Warriors Evolution Tree. isoaker.com. Retrieved 19 March 2012.  |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
  6. ^ G., Bob. "Water Gun / Water Blaster Analyses Listings / Soaker Databae :: :: iSoaker.com". isoaker.com. Retrieved 19 March 2012. 
  7. ^ "Water Gun / Water Blaster Product Analyses Listings". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  8. ^ "Super Soaker Other Pressurization Systems Soaker Evolution Tree". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  9. ^ "Super Soaker 50". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  10. ^ Murrie, Steve and Matthew (2007). Every Minute On Earth. Page 172: September 1, 2007. p. 172. ISBN 0439908876. 
  11. ^ a b c "How water guns work". Physics. Super Soaker Central. Retrieved 20 March 2012.  |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
  12. ^ "Water Warriors Renegade". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  13. ^ "Water Warriors Gorgon". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  14. ^ "Water Warriors Ultimate Explorer". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  15. ^ "Water Warriors Colossus". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  16. ^ "Water Warriors Vindicator". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  17. ^ "Water Warriors Vanquisher". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  18. ^ "Water Gun / Water Blaster Product Analyses Listings / Soaker Database (Aqua Master Search)". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  19. ^ T., Ben. "Supercannon II (large homemade air-piston gun)". Homemades. Super Soaker Central. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  20. ^ "Water Warriors Splat Blaster". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  21. ^ "Water Warriors Steady Stream". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  22. ^ "Water Gun / Water Blaster Product Analyses Listings (Pulse)". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  23. ^ "Water Gun / Water Blaster Product Analyses Listings (motorized class)". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  24. ^ "Water Warriors Scorpion". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  25. ^ "Water Warriors Tarantula". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  26. ^ Porges, Seth. "The Top 6 Water Guns of All Time (slide 4)". Popular Mechanics. Popular Mechanics. Retrieved 21 March 2012. 
  27. ^ "Water Warriors Jet". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  28. ^ Sofge, Erik. "Super Soaker Showdown: Abusive Lab Test". Popular Mechanics. Popular Mechanics. Retrieved 3 April 2012. 
  29. ^ "Survey: Super Soaker vs. Water Warriors". Stock Water Blasters. iSoaker.com. Archived from the original on May 10, 2012. Retrieved 1 May 2012. 
  30. ^ "Breakthrough: Meeting with Buzz Bee Toys Inc". isoaker.com. isoaker.com. Retrieved 4 April 2012.  |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
  31. ^ "Hasbro sues other toy makers over patents". 2 June 2010. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 
  32. ^ "Water Gun / Water Blaster Product Analyses Listings / Soaker Database (water warriors blasters)". The Armoury. isoaker.com. Retrieved 20 March 2012. 

External links[edit]