Wauseon, Ohio

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Wauseon, Ohio
City
Buildings in downtown Wauseon
Buildings in downtown Wauseon
Motto(s): A City You'll Take To Heart
Location of Wauseon, Ohio
Location of Wauseon, Ohio
Location of Wauseon in Fulton County
Location of Wauseon in Fulton County
Coordinates: 41°33′8″N 84°8′21″W / 41.55222°N 84.13917°W / 41.55222; -84.13917Coordinates: 41°33′8″N 84°8′21″W / 41.55222°N 84.13917°W / 41.55222; -84.13917
Country  USA
State  Ohio
County Fulton
Township Clinton
Government
 • Mayor Kathy Huner[1]
Area[2]
 • Total 5.19 sq mi (13.44 km2)
 • Land 5.17 sq mi (13.39 km2)
 • Water 0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation[3] 771 ft (235 m)
Population (2010)[4]
 • Total 7,332
 • Estimate (2015[5]) 7,316
 • Density 1,418.2/sq mi (547.6/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code 43567
Area code(s) 419 and 567
FIPS code 39-81928[6]
GNIS feature ID 1047628[3]
Website www.cityofwauseon.com

Wauseon is a city in and the county seat of Fulton County, Ohio, United States[7] approximately 31 mi (51 km) west of Toledo. The population was 7,332 at the 2010 census. It was named after Wauseon, a Potawatomi Native American chief[8] who lived in the area before the founding of the state.

History[edit]

The first seat of justice in the county was Ottokee, because of its central location in the county; a wooden courthouse was built in 1851.[9] Wauseon was platted 1854 when the railroad was extended to that point.[10] The village was incorporated in 1859. With the commercial success that the railroad brought to Wauseon, it was designated county seat in 1871.[9] The Fulton County Courthouse was built in 1872.[11]

Geography[edit]

Wauseon is located at 41°33′8″N 84°8′21″W / 41.55222°N 84.13917°W / 41.55222; -84.13917 (41.552230, -84.139126).[14]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.19 square miles (13.44 km2), of which 5.17 square miles (13.39 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860378
18701,474289.9%
18801,90529.2%
18902,0608.1%
19002,1484.3%
19102,65023.4%
19203,03514.5%
19302,889−4.8%
19403,0164.4%
19503,49415.8%
19604,31123.4%
19704,93214.4%
19806,17025.1%
19906,3222.5%
20007,09112.2%
20107,3323.4%
Est. 20177,342[15]0.1%
Sources:[16][17][18][19][20][6][21]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2010, there were 7,332 people, 2,798 households, and 1,939 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,418.2 inhabitants per square mile (547.6/km2). There were 3,061 housing units at an average density of 592.1 per square mile (228.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.3% White, 0.9% African American, 0.3% Native American, 1.0% Asian, 5.2% from other races, and 2.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.2% of the population.

There were 2,798 households of which 38.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.4% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 30.7% were non-families. 26.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.10.

The median age in the city was 35.4 years. 28.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.6% were from 25 to 44; 24.5% were from 45 to 64; and 13.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.9% male and 52.1% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 7,091 people, 2,706 households, and 1,875 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,437.6 people per square mile (555.3/km²). There were 2,851 housing units at an average density of 578.0 per square mile (223.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 92.77% White, 0.55% African American, 0.37% Native American, 0.82% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 4.02% from other races, and 1.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.79% of the population.

There were 2,706 households out of which 37.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.0% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.7% were non-families. 26.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the city the population was spread out with 29.1% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 20.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 88.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $39,591, and the median income for a family was $48,981. Males had a median income of $32,645 versus $24,042 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,491. About 3.9% of families and 5.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.5% of those under age 18 and 1.7% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Schools[edit]

Wauseon Exempted Village School District operates four schools within the city: a primary school, elementary school, middle school, and Wauseon High School.[22]

Library[edit]

The library was originally funded by tycoon and entrepreneur Andrew Carnegie in 1906.[23] In 2005, the library loaned more than 238,000 items to its 20,000 cardholders. Total holdings in 2005 were over 91,000 volumes with over 210 periodical subscriptions. From 2016-2017 the library underwent a major renovation, fixing the crumbling foundation of the library building. The library temporarily moved out to the former location of Bill's Lockeroom on Shoop Avenue until mid April 2017 before moving back in to the original library building on Elm Street.[24][25]

Medical Care[edit]

Fulton County Health Center is a rural critical access hospital that includes an emergency department with a heliport for medical evacuation.

Parks & Attractions[edit]

Westbound Wabash Cannonball Trail, Rotary Park, Wauseon, Ohio
  • Biddle Park: Opening in May of 2009, Biddle Park is a 52-acre sports complex and park that consists of 8 baseball/softball fields, 3 T-ball fields, batting cages, 3 basketball courts, 3 sand volleyball courts, a football field, and 9 soccer pitchers. The park will add 4 more baseball/softball fields before being completed.[26] Biddle Park hosts many events each summer, city league youth sports, multi state baseball and softball tournaments, NWOAL league tournaments, and the city's 4th of July Fireworks display. The park is named after Dorothy Biddle, who donated 1.7 million dollars to the building of the park in 2003.[27]
  • Fulton County Fair, including the Fulton County 9/11 Memorial
  • Midwest Geobash the Midwest's largest and best annual geocaching event is held in July at the Fulton County Fairgrounds.[28]
  • Wabash Cannonball Trail which features 4 miles of paved trail in the city of Wauseon
  • AMCA National Motorcycle Meet is held annually in Wauseon. It is one of the largest antique motorcycle swap meets and judging events in the United States.[29]
  • Sterlena the Cow, a 14 foot tall fiberglass cow that once served as the mascot for Sterling's Dairy before the company went out of business. Sterlena now resides at the Fulton County Fairgrounds.[30]

Notable people[edit]

Media[edit]

Print[edit]

Fulton County Expositor, a paper of Ohio Community Media[33]

The Village Reporter[34]

Radio[edit]

96.1 WMTR-FM

Television[edit]

INTV-Channel 5[35]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MAYOR'S OFFICE". City of Wauseon, OH. Retrieved 22 December 2015. 
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-24. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  3. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  5. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-06-07. 
  6. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  8. ^ "Ohio History Central, Wauseon, Ohio". Retrieved 28 March 2016. 
  9. ^ a b Aldrich, Lewis Cass (1888). History of Henry and Fulton counties, Ohio : with illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers. Syracuse, N. Y.: D. Mason & Co., Publishers. pp. 288–289. 
  10. ^ Reighard, Frank H. (1920). A Standard History of Fulton County, Ohio (Volume 1). Lewis Publishing Company. p. 209. 
  11. ^ Hellmann, Paul T. (May 13, 2013). "Historical Gazetteer of the United States". Routledge. p. 876. Retrieved 30 November 2013. 
  12. ^ Railroad & township map of Ohio (Map). Library of Congress. 1851. Retrieved 11 April 2016. 
  13. ^ J. A. Norton, Ohio commissioner of railroads & telegraphs (1890). Railroad map of Ohio (Map). Retrieved 11 April 2016. 
  14. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  15. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 26, 2018. 
  16. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties" (PDF). Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  17. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  18. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  19. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. [permanent dead link]
  20. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  21. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 17 June 2013. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  22. ^ "Homepage". Wauseon Exempted Village Schools. Retrieved 25 February 2018. 
  23. ^ http://www.wauseonlibrary.org/about-us.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  24. ^ http://www.wauseonlibrary.org/tags/library-renovation.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  25. ^ "2005 Ohio Public Library Statistics:Statistics by County and Town". State Library of Ohio. Archived from the original on 2006-09-24. Retrieved November 10, 2006. 
  26. ^ Design, Chief Web. "Shelter House Rental & Park Information - City of Wauseon". www.cityofwauseon.com. Retrieved 2018-01-29. 
  27. ^ "52-acre park is dedicated in Wauseon". The Blade. 2009-06-02. Retrieved 2018-01-29. 
  28. ^ Scheuer, Sonja. "Bash History". www.midwestgeobash.org. Retrieved 2018-04-20. 
  29. ^ http://www.wauseonnationalmeet.org/
  30. ^ "Sterlina The Cow - Roadside Wonders". roadsidewonders.net. Retrieved 2018-01-29. 
  31. ^ Barny Oldfield ToledosAttic.org Retrieved 29 March 2016
  32. ^ Wauseon High School 2007 Athletic Hall of Fame Inductees. (n.d.). Retrieved December 4, 2007, from http://www.wauseon.k12.oh.us/Hall_of_Fame/Rick%20Volk.pdf
  33. ^ http://fcnews.org/
  34. ^ http://www.thevillagereporter.com/
  35. ^ http://intv5.com/schedule.htm

External links[edit]