WeTransfer

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WeTransfer
WeTransfer logo.png
Website wetransfer.com
Alexa rank Negative increase 347 (September 2016)[1]
Launched 2009

WeTransfer is a cloud-based computer file transfer service based in Amsterdam, Netherlands to send files that may be much larger than permitted by email systems.[2][3] There is a free service, with more features available in a paid service. Free users can send files of up to 2GB, and WeTransfer Plus supports sending files of 20GB.[4] The company is bootstrapped and was co-founded in 2009 by Bas Beerens and Nalden.[5]

History[edit]

WeTransfer began life as OY Transfer,[6] a client-only FTP server for Beerens' local design consultancy OY Communications. However, after their client Nike Inc. expressed a preference for OY Transfer over their own tools, its potential became apparent and it was turned into a standalone business. From launch until September 2012 WeTransfer had delivered more than 100 million files.[7][1]

The service[edit]

In the free service, the user uploads files to WeTransfer's Web site and specifies the recipient's email address; the recipient is notified and can download the file until it expires, in seven days. The Plus service allows larger files, keeps them for longer, allows password-protection, and has other features.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Site Overview wetransfer.com, Alexa Internet. Retrieved on 28 September 2016.
  2. ^ Nathan Eddy (2013-10-22). "BYOD Policies Unimportant to Generation Y: Fortinet". eWeek.com. Retrieved 2013-10-28. 
  3. ^ "Nalden". The Next Speaker. Retrieved 2013-10-28. 
  4. ^ "Inviare file pesanti: quail programmi usare?". Business & Tech. 2013-10-24. Retrieved 2013-10-28. 
  5. ^ Eva Oude Elferink (2013-10-21). "Nalden: ‘Door het design van WeTransfer durven mensen het te gebruiken’" (in Dutch). Volkskrant.nl. Retrieved 2013-10-28. 
  6. ^ Article on WeTransfer in issue_16 summer_2011-2 (see p82) at issuu.com
  7. ^ 2012 Article on european-startups at wired.co.uk

External links[edit]