We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

"We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together"
A photograph of Swift wearing sunglasses, a white shirt and black shorts sitting on a grassland. Her name "Taylor Swift" is printed in white and the title "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" is printed in red, both are capitalized.
Single by Taylor Swift
from the album Red
ReleasedAugust 13, 2012 (2012-08-13)
Studio
Genre
Length3:12
LabelBig Machine
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)
  • Max Martin
  • Shellback
  • Taylor Swift[1]
Taylor Swift singles chronology
"Both of Us"
(2012)
"We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together"
(2012)
"Ronan"
(2012)
Music video
"We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" on YouTube

"We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" is a song by American singer-songwriter Taylor Swift, taken from her fourth studio album, Red (2012). It was released for digital download and to U.S. pop radio as the lead single from Red on August 13, 2012, by Big Machine Records. Swift wrote and produced the song with Max Martin and Shellback. An upbeat dance-pop and pop rock song, "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" contains pulsing synthesizers, processed guitar riffs, bass drums, and a spoken-word bridge. Its lyrics express Swift's frustration with an ex-lover who wants to rekindle their relationship. An alternate version was released to U.S. country radio on August 21, 2012.

Music critics praised the track for its catchy melody and radio-friendly sound, though some described its lyrics as subpar for Swift's songwriting abilities. The song appeared in year-end lists by Rolling Stone, Time, and The Village Voice. "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" peaked atop the charts in Canada and New Zealand, and reached the top five in Australia, Ireland, Israel, Japan, and the U.K. On the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, the single debuted at number 72 and rose to number one the following week, registering one of the biggest single-week jumps in chart history. The single spent a record-breaking nine consecutive weeks topping the Hot Country Songs chart, and received multi-platinum certifications in Australia, Japan, New Zealand, and the U.S.

The music video for the song was released on August 30, 2012. The accolades that "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" received include a Billboard Music Award for Top Country Song, a Grammy Award nomination for Record of the Year, a CMT Music Award nomination for Best Music Video, and a People's Choice Award nomination for Favorite Song. Swift included the song on the set lists of three of her world tours: the Red Tour (2013–14), the 1989 World Tour (2015), and Reputation Stadium Tour (2018). A re-recorded version of the song is featured on Red (Taylor's Version), Swift's 2021 re-recording of her 2012 album.

Background and release[edit]

After writing Speak Now (2010) entirely solo, Swift opted to collaborate with different songwriters and producers for Red. Thus, she called Max Martin and Shellback, two songwriters and producers whose work she admired, to discuss a possible collaboration. The trio conceived the concept for "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" shortly after a friend of Swift's ex-boyfriend walked into the recording studio and spoke of rumors he heard that Swift and her former flame were reuniting. After the friend left, Martin and Shellback asked Swift to elaborate on the details of the relationship, which she described as "break up, get back together, break up, get back together, just, ugh, the worst". When Martin suggested that they write about the incident, Swift began playing the guitar and singing, "We are never ever......", and the song flowed rapidly afterwards. She described the process as one of the most humorous experiences she had while recording, and said the musical partners matched her expectations. An audio clip of her sarcastically speaking about breakups can be heard before the final chorus.[2]

The single was the lead single from Red.[3] Swift premiered the single on August 13, 2012, during a live chat on Google+[4] with the song released on Google Play that day[5] for digital download and to iTunes and Amazon.com the next day, August 14.[6][7] A lyric video also premiered on Swift's official Vevo that same day.[8] The song was released to Adult Contemporary radio stations on August 13, 2012[9] and to mainstream radio stations the next day.[10] The song was released to country radio on August 21, 2012.[11] The music video for the song premiered on August 30, 2012.[12] A limited edition individually numbered CD single was released to Swift's official store and Amazon.com on September 4, 2012. The limited edition CD single was packaged with a "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" T-shirt and backpack.[13] The CD single was also available for individual purchase.[14] The CD single was released exclusively to US Walmart stores the same day.[15]

Composition and lyrics[edit]

The three-minute-and-twelve-second song[5] features electronic heavy production accompanied to acoustic guitars, a banjo, and a pop music vocal styling, a musical transition for Swift.[16] It was written in the key of G Major with a common time signature and a slow tempo of eighty-six beats per minute, with Swift's vocals spanning one octave and five notes, from G3 to E5.[17] The track features an acoustic guitar (some of its sounds are reversed) and various synthesizers over an electronic drum beat. The country radio release featured a different instrumental arrangement. The alternate mix replaced the guitar, drum machine, and synthesizers with a mandolin, fiddle, steel guitar and snare drums.[18] The song was written by Swift, along with Max Martin and Shellback.[18][19] The lyrics discuss Swift's frustration towards a former male lover who wants to rekindle their relationship. Jonathan Keefe of Slant Magazine describes it as a bubblegum pop number[20][21] while AllMusic categorized the song under the dance-pop genre.[22] James Lancho, reviewing the album Red called the song "sassy pop-rock in the mould of Katy Perry",[23] and Marc Hogan of Spin deemed the single "saucy electro-pop".[24] The New York Times dubbed it a "snarky electro-folk tune".[25]

Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Billboard
Common Sense Media
Digital Spy
Rolling Stone

Upon initial release, the song received positive reviews from music critics. Robert Myers of The Village Voice felt that the song, while "good", was "not Swift at her best" and speculated that the decision to release it as a lead single was made for commercial reasons: "I doubt 'Never Ever' is even close to being the best song on Red; it's a teaser, an indication to her fans of what's coming up. That sounds like commercial calculation of the worst kind, but I don't think it is. Swift's connection with her audience is possibly more important than her connection with her boyfriends. And there is one brilliant touch: the spoken bit that comes after the middle eight."[26] Grady Smith of Entertainment Weekly drew comparisons with Avril Lavigne and praised the "undeniable, instantly catchy hook".[18] While describing the song as "joyous", he nevertheless expressed concern that the song's "juvenile sensibilities" marked a regression following Swift's work on Speak Now.[18] Jody Rosen of Rolling Stone noted that the song's "hooks, plural, have a zing that's more Stockholm than Nashville. But it's unmistakably Taylor: a witty relationship postmortem, delivered in inimitable girlie-girl patois. And this bit – "I'm just, I mean, this is exhausting. Like, we are never getting back together. Like, ever" – might be the most sublime spoken-word interlude in pop since Barry White died."[27]

Marah Eakin of The A.V. Club commented on "what a good song it is": "With its thumping kick drum, clipped syncopation, and mildly snarky lyrics, it's a teen dream in the vein of Swift's other sing-along jams like "Love Story" or "You Belong with Me."[28] Kevin Coyne of Country Universe gave the song a failing D grade, calling it a "huge step backward".[29] James Montgomery of MTV felt the "fantastic" song may "represent a turning point in her career ... Swift no longer has any interest in being the victim ... [She] displays a defiant, liberated streak". He noted that the song seemed "custom-crafted to dominate radio ... all shiny, silvery guitars and walloping, whomping choruses".[30] Amy Sciarretto of Popcrush praised Swift for capturing a "universal feeling in an upbeat, empowering song" and described it as "one of the catchiest tunes she's ever penned".[31] Jonathan Keefe of Slant Magazine described "the melodic hook" as the song's best attribute but criticized Swift's "stilted phrasing". He described her vocal performance as a "complete misfire", pointing out that her voice was at its "most unpleasant and nasal". However, Keefe warned that it was "premature" to say the "full-on pop" song "signals anything more than a temporary breakup".[20] David Malitz of The Washington Post found the song immature and remarked, "the chorus is catchy but if this is representative of what awaits on Red, it's hard to be too excited".[32] Glenn Gamboa of Newsday described it as "anthemic in a slick pop way, rather than her usual modern country way ... Part of T. Swizzle's charm is the way she makes her songs sound genuine and conversational and 'Never Ever' is no exception".[33] Billy Dukes of Taste of Country stated that "[Swift] captures the anger of young love gone wrong better than anyone since, well…[Taylor] Swift" and that the song's melody is "difficult to embrace quickly."[34] However, Camille Mann of CBS News considered the song to be "catchy".[35]

"We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" featured on 2012 year-end lists by Rolling Stone (second),[36] Time (fourth),[37] The Guardian (fifth),[38] The Village Voice's Pazz & Jop critics' poll (sixth),[39] PopMatters (11th),[40] NME (24th),[41] and Consequence (40th).[42] The single was named the 169th best song of 2010–2014 on Pitchfork's "The 200 Best Tracks of the Decade So Far (2010-2014)" list.[43] It also received a Grammy nomination for Record of the Year for the 2013 Grammy Awards.[44] In 2019, Stereogum ranked the song as the 71st best song of the 2010s.[45] Rolling Stone ranked the song as the thirteenth-best female country song of the 2000s and 2010s.[46] The Tampa Bay Times ranked it 4th on their list of the best 2010s pop songs.[47]

Accolades[edit]

Year Organization Award/work Result Ref
2012 Guinness World Records Fastest Selling Single in Digital History Won [48]
2013 Academy of Country Music Awards Best Music Video Nominated [49]
Billboard Music Awards Top Streaming Song (Video) Nominated [50]
Top Country Song Won
BMI Awards Award-Winning Songs Won [51]
CMT Music Awards Video of the Year Nominated [52]
Grammy Awards Record of the Year Nominated [53]
MTV Video Music Awards Japan Best Female Video Nominated [54]
Best Pop Video Nominated
Best Karaoke Video Nominated
Much Music Video Awards International Video of the Year Nominated [55]
Myx Music Award Favourite International Video Nominated [56]
Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Awards Favourite Song Nominated [57]
Argentina Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Awards Favorite International Song Nominated [58]
People's Choice Awards Favourite Song Nominated [59]
Radio Disney Music Awards Best Break Up Song Won [60]
[61]
Sirius XM Holdings Awards International Video of the Year Nominated [62]
International Single of the Year Nominated
Teen Choice Awards Choice Break-Up Song Nominated [63]
Choice Country Song Won
MTV Millennial Awards Hit Chicle del Año (Catchiest Hit of the Year) Won [64]
Hito Music Awards Best Western Song Won [65]
2014 World Music Awards World's Best Song Won [66]
World's Best Video Nominated
ASCAP Awards Most Performed Song Won [67]
BMI Pop Awards Award-Winning Song Won [68]

Commercial performance[edit]

In the U.S., "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" debuted at number 72 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart week ending August 25, 2012, based on two days of airplay.[69] It rose to number one the following week, registering one of the biggest single-week jumps in chart history.[70] Giving Swift her first Hot 100 number one, it made Swift the country artist with the most top-ten chart entries (11, tying with Kenny Rogers).[71] It spent two consecutive weeks at number one[72] and was the first country song to spend three or more weeks at number one after Kenny Rogers's "Lady" (1980).[73] The single stayed in the top ten for thirteen non-consecutive weeks.[74] On the Radio Songs chart, "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" entered at number 25, the highest debut for a song by a female country artist.[75] It peaked at number three for three non-consecutive weeks, giving Swift her fourth top-ten entry.[76] On the Hot Digital Songs chart, "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" debuted at number one with first-week sales of 623,000 digital copies in the week ending September 1, 2012, setting a record for the fastest-selling digital single by a female artist in Billboard chart history.[note 1]

A black-and-white portrait of Connie Smith in 1960s hairstyle looking upwards
The single's nine consecutive weeks atop the Hot Country Songs chart broke the record of "Once a Day" (1965) by Connie Smith (pictured).

The single debuted at number 13 on the Hot Country Songs chart week ending September 1, 2012, based on airplay alone.[79] After Billboard changed the methodology for the chart, incorporating digital sales and streaming into chart rankings in addition to airplay, "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" ascended to number one for the chart dated October 20, 2012, giving Swift her seventh Hot Country Songs number one.[80] This prompted industry debate over the status of Swift as a country artist, given that "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" received lukewarm reception at country radio and never reached the top ten of the Country Airplay chart, and was more favorably received at pop radio.[81] It remained on the top spot of the Hot Country Songs for nine consecutive weeks, breaking the eight consecutive weeks record of Connie Smith's "Once a Day" (1965) for the longest unbroken run at number one for a female artist.[82] The song spent a total of ten weeks at number one,[83] a career best for Swift and a record for the longest-run at number one for a female artist.[note 2]

"We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" peaked within the top ten of Billboard airplay charts including Adult Contemporary, where it reached number ten for seven non-consecutive weeks,[86] Adult Top 40, where it reached number seven,[87] and Mainstream Top 40, where it peaked at number two for four non-consecutive weeks.[88] Roughly two months after its release, the single surpassed two million U.S. digital sales by September 2012, making Swift the first country artist two have six digital singles each sell over two million copies.[89] By July 2019, "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" had sold 4.1 million copies in the U.S.[90] The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) certified the single six times platinum, denoting six million units based on sales and streaming.[91] In neighboring Canada, the single peaked atop the Canadian Hot 100, Swift's second number one following "Today Was a Fairytale" (2010).[92] It was certified gold by Music Canada (MC).[93]

Outside North America, "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" peaked atop the record chart in New Zealand, where it was certified double platinum by Recorded Music NZ (RMNZ).[94] The single peaked within the top ten on charts in Israel (number two),[95] Australia (number three),[96] Ireland (number four),[97] the U.K. (number four),[98] Norway (number six),[99] Hungary (number nine),[100] and Spain (number nine).[101] It peaked at number eight on Euro Digital Song Sales, a Billboard chart monitoring digital singles across Europe.[102] The track was certified platinum in Sweden and the U.K.,[103][104] and five times platinum in Australia.[105] By October 2014, the single had sold over 616,000 digital copies in the U.K.[106] In Japan, "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" was a chart success, peaking at number two on the Japan Hot 100 and remained on the chart until 2015, three years after its release.[107] The Recording Industry Association of Japan (RIAJ) awarded the single a "Million" certification for selling over one million digital copies.[108]

Music video[edit]

Background and release[edit]

A music video for the song premiered on CMT, MTV and TeenNick on August 30, 2012, at 7:49 pm Eastern time, and later on MTV.com, CMT.com, and VH1.com the same day at 8:00 pm Eastern time. The video is directed by Declan Whitebloom, with whom Swift has worked on the music videos for both "Mean" and "Ours".[12] The video was shot like a pop-up book using a Sony F65 CineAlta camera with Leica 25 mm Summilux-C lens in one continuous shot with no editing, and features five sets and Swift in as many outfits.[109] It is also the first music video to be featured in 4K resolution.[110] According to Swift, she wanted the video to be as "quirky as the song sounds" and stated that "There's just knitting everywhere; there's just random woodland creatures popping up."[35] Prior to the video's release, a fourteen-second preview was released by CMT on their official YouTube on August 30, 2012.[111] As of September 2021, it has over 674 million views on YouTube.[112]

Synopsis[edit]

The video, which is done as one continuous shot,[113] begins with Swift in colorful pajamas recounting the events of her off and on again relationship with her ex-boyfriend (played by Noah Mills). The video then segues into Swift going into her living room where her band is dressed up in animal costumes and Swift belts out the chorus of the song. The video then goes to a TV where Swift says "Like, ever." and then to the dining room where we see she returns to recounting the events of her relationship and receives a phone call from her ex who is calling her from a nightclub. Swift hangs up on him and he walks off screen into the nightclub. It then goes to the two in a truck having an argument then to them having a stroll in the park. Swift then runs off and we see her on the phone telling the person on the other line how she and her ex are not getting back together and her frustration of their entire relationship. The video then segues back to Swift's living room where a party is going on and her ex shows up unannounced trying to woo her back and she slams the door in his face. The video ends with Swift on her window ledge where she was at the beginning of the video, singing the last line of the song.[114]

Reception[edit]

James Montgomery of MTV praised the video stating that the video is "truly a treat to watch".[115] Jim Farber of the New York Daily News comment on the video was that "[Swift's] tone and demeanor in the clip is conversational and sarcastic, ideally suited to simulating intimacy with her massive teen girl fan-base."[116] Carl Williott of Idolator commented on the video's content and stated "what more could you ask for in a visual for a #1 pop smash?"[117] Rolling Stone called it "flinging strong-willed sass".[118] David Greenwald of Billboard stated that the video "is a quirky celebration that finds Swift singing and dancing with band members in animal costumes in between relationship flashbacks -- all filmed in an elaborate long shot. Swift wears large glasses and a pair of printed pajamas as she shrugs off her not-so-nice ex-boyfriend, a scruffy, seemingly older musician-type with a penchant for drama."[119]

Live performances[edit]

Swift performing "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" on the Red Tour in 2013

Swift performed the song live for the first time at the 2012 MTV Video Music Awards on September 6, 2012, which was held at the Staples Center in Los Angeles.[12][120] Swift was the last performance of the night and, wearing a red and white striped shirt and black shorts, began her performance in an area resembling a recording studio before taking the stage along with her back-up singers, dancers and band (in animal costumes) took the stage.[121] Swift also performed the song live at the iHeartRadio Music Festival in 2012 and 2014. During her visit to Brazil, she performed the song on TV Xuxa and during a concert in Rio de Janeiro on September 13, 2012.[122][123]

Swift performed the song on the British version of The X Factor on October 14, 2012.[124] She performed the song on the German TV show Schlag Den Raab.[125] On January 25, 2013, Swift performed "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" at the Los Premios 40 Principales in Spain.[126] The next day, she performed it in Cannes, France, during the NRJ Music Awards.[127] On February 10, 2013, Swift performed the song at the 2013 Grammy Awards, opening the ceremony. She performs the song on her Red Tour nightly as the finale. A rock version of the song was performed on The 1989 World Tour. More recently, the song was performed as a mashup with "This Is Why We Can't Have Nice Things" as the finale on Swift's Reputation Stadium Tour. Swift performed the song on the iHeartRadio Wango Tango on June 1, 2019. On December 8, she performed an acoustic version of the song at Capital FM's Jingle Bell Ball 2019 in London.[128]

Parodies[edit]

The song and video were parodied by teddiefilms in the style of Breaking Bad. The parody, called "We Are Never Ever Gonna Cook Together," was uploaded to YouTube on October 18, 2012.[129] The 22nd episode of Grey's Anatomy's tenth season is titled "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together".[130] On September 8, 2012, YouTube star Shane Dawson, parodied the song, releasing a studio version[131] and a music video on his YouTube channel.[132] Sky News remixed portions of speeches by David Cameron to make it appear as though he was reciting the chorus as promotion for their coverage of the 2014 Scotland Independence Referendum.[133]

Credits and personnel[edit]

Credits are adapted from the liner notes of the CD single.[134]

Charts[edit]

Certifications and sales[edit]

Certifications for "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together", with pure sales figures where available
Region Certification Certified units/sales
Australia (ARIA)[105] 5× Platinum 350,000^
Canada (Music Canada)[93] Gold 40,000*
Germany (BVMI)[184] Gold 150,000double-dagger
Italy (FIMI)[185] Gold 15,000*
Japan (RIAJ)[108] Million 1,000,000*
Mexico (AMPROFON)[186] Gold 30,000*
New Zealand (RMNZ)[94] 2× Platinum 30,000*
South Korea 950,000[187]
Sweden (GLF)[103] Platinum 40,000double-dagger
United Kingdom (BPI)[104] Platinum 600,000double-dagger
United States (RIAA)[91] 6× Platinum 6,000,000double-dagger
Streaming
Denmark (IFPI Danmark)[188] Platinum 1,800,000dagger
Japan (RIAJ)[189] Gold 50,000,000dagger

* Sales figures based on certification alone.
^ Shipments figures based on certification alone.
double-dagger Sales+streaming figures based on certification alone.
dagger Streaming-only figures based on certification alone.

Release history[edit]

Release dates and formats for "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together"
Country Date Format Label
United States[9] August 13, 2012 Hot adult contemporary radio
Various[190][191][192][193] August 14, 2012 Digital download Big Machine
United States[10] Contemporary hit radio
  • Big Machine
  • Republic
United Kingdom[194] August 19, 2012
United States[11] August 21, 2012 Country radio Big Machine
United States[13] September 4, 2012 Limited edition CD single
Italy[195] September 7, 2012 Contemporary hit radio Universal
Germany[196] September 28, 2012

We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together (Taylor's Version)[edit]

"We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together (Taylor's Version)"
Song by Taylor Swift
from the album Red (Taylor's Version)
ReleasedNovember 12, 2021 (2021-11-12)
Genre
Length3:13
LabelRepublic
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)
Lyric video
"We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together (Taylor's Version)" on YouTube

Swift re-recorded "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together", subtitled "(Taylor's Version)", for her second re-recorded album, Red (Taylor's Version), released on November 12, 2021, through Republic Records.[197]

Charts[edit]

Chart performance for "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together (Taylor's Version)"
Chart (2021) Peak
position
Australia (ARIA)[198] 34
Canada (Canadian Hot 100)[199] 40
Global 200 (Billboard)[200] 41
Singapore (RIAS)[201] 22
UK Streaming (OCC)[202] 61
US Billboard Hot 100[203] 55
US Hot Country Songs (Billboard)[204] 16

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ The record was broken by Adele's 2015 single "Hello" (2015), which sold over 1.1 million digital copies in its first week.[77][78]
  2. ^ The record was broken by Bebe Rexha's "Meant to Be" (2017) featuring Florida Georgia Line, which spent 35 consecutive weeks at number one.[84][85]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Grammy Awards Winners & Nominees for Record Of The Year". The Recording Academy. Archived from the original on November 17, 2017. Retrieved June 2, 2021.
  2. ^ Effron, Lauren (August 13, 2012). "Taylor Swift Reveals New Album, 'Red,' Drops New Single, 'We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together': ABC Exclusive". ABC News. Archived from the original on October 15, 2017. Retrieved August 14, 2012.
  3. ^ Wolff, Kurt (January 16, 2013). "Behind The Song: Taylor Swift 'We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together'". CBS Local. Baltimore. Archived from the original on February 1, 2013. Retrieved January 16, 2013.
  4. ^ Taylor Swift (August 13, 2012). "Taylor Swift Web Chat and G+ Hangout". YouTube. Google Inc. Archived from the original on November 23, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2012.
  5. ^ a b "Taylor Swift: We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together". Google Play. Google Inc. August 13, 2012. Archived from the original on October 23, 2012. Retrieved August 17, 2012.
  6. ^ "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together – Single". Apple Music. Archived from the original on August 19, 2012. Retrieved August 14, 2012.
  7. ^ "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together: Taylor Swift: MP3 Download". Amazon. August 14, 2012. Archived from the original on August 24, 2012. Retrieved August 17, 2012.
  8. ^ TaylorSwiftVevo (August 14, 2012). "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together (Lyric Video)". YouTube. Vevo and Google Inc. Archived from the original on August 15, 2012. Retrieved August 15, 2012.
  9. ^ a b "AC Available for Airplay". FMQB. Archived from the original on August 19, 2012. Retrieved August 18, 2012.
  10. ^ a b "Available for Airplay Archive". FMQB. Archived from the original on November 17, 2012. Retrieved August 18, 2012.
  11. ^ a b "Going for Adds: Country". Radio & Records. Archived from the original on July 21, 2013. Retrieved August 18, 2012.
  12. ^ a b c "Taylor Swift's New Video Debuts Thursday". CMT. August 28, 2012. Archived from the original on October 29, 2014. Retrieved August 28, 2012.
  13. ^ a b Sources:
  14. ^ Sources:
  15. ^ "We Are Never Ever (Walmart Exclusive), Taylor Swift: Country: Walmart.com". Walmart.com. Walmart (US) Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. September 4, 2012. Archived from the original on June 5, 2016. Retrieved September 7, 2012.
  16. ^ D. Chandler (August 15, 2012). "Taylor Swift's New Single "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together," Triumphs". The Guardian Express. Archived from the original on February 8, 2016. Retrieved August 15, 2012.
  17. ^ "Digital sheet music – Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together". Musicnotes.com. Alfred Publishing. August 13, 2012. Archived from the original on December 3, 2013. Retrieved August 24, 2012.
  18. ^ a b c d Smith, Grady (August 14, 2012). "Taylor Swift releases single 'We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together', announces new album 'Red'". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on November 2, 2014. Retrieved August 14, 2012.
  19. ^ "Taylor Swift's Fourth CD, Red, Set for Worldwide Release on October 22nd". PR Newswire. Big Machine Records. August 13, 2012. Archived from the original on February 8, 2016. Retrieved August 14, 2012.
  20. ^ a b Jonathan Keefe (August 15, 2012). "Single Review: Taylor Swift, "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together"". Slant Magazine. Archived from the original on August 26, 2017. Retrieved August 15, 2012.
  21. ^ "August 23 – "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" Arrives". Spin. Archived from the original on October 9, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  22. ^ "Red: Review". AllMusic. Archived from the original on June 3, 2016. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  23. ^ Lachno, James (October 19, 2012). "Taylor Swift, Red, album review". Telegraph. Archived from the original on October 12, 2016. Retrieved March 8, 2016.
  24. ^ Hogan, Marc (August 29, 2012). "Taylor Swift's New Album 'Red' Will Drop the Bass". Spin. Archived from the original on September 22, 2020. Retrieved July 21, 2020.
  25. ^ Hyden, Steven (March 10, 2021). "Taylor Swift's Indie Act". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on April 13, 2021. Retrieved May 1, 2021.
  26. ^ Myers, Robert (August 7, 2012). "Hot 100 Roundup: Taylor Swift's Kiss-Off To Country, Mumford & Sons' Folkie Rave, And More - New York - Music - Sound of the City". The Village Voice. Archived from the original on June 6, 2015. Retrieved August 16, 2012.
  27. ^ Jody Rosen (August 23, 2012). "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together | Rolling Stone". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on January 28, 2018. Retrieved August 26, 2012.
  28. ^ Marah Eakin (August 17, 2012). "Mourn summer's inevitable end with new Taylor Swift, Ty Segall, and Pinback | Playlisted". The A.V. Club. Onion Inc. Archived from the original on October 3, 2013. Retrieved August 18, 2012.
  29. ^ Kevin Coyne (August 14, 2012). "Single Review: Taylor Swift, "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together"". Country Universe. Archived from the original on December 5, 2014. Retrieved August 14, 2012.
  30. ^ James Montgomery (February 13, 2012). "Taylor Swift's 'Never Ever Getting Back Together:' No More Tears - Music, Celebrity, Artist News". MTV. Archived from the original on October 3, 2013. Retrieved August 16, 2012.
  31. ^ Amy Sciarretto (August 14, 2012). "Taylor Swift, 'We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together' – Song Review". Popcrush.com. Archived from the original on April 23, 2017. Retrieved August 16, 2012.
  32. ^ Malitz, David (February 22, 2011). "Taylor Swift, 'We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together': It's trending, but is it good? - The Style Blog". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on October 14, 2017. Retrieved August 16, 2012.
  33. ^ Glenn Gamboa (August 14, 2012). "Hear Taylor Swift's new single". Newsday. Archived from the original on July 14, 2014. Retrieved August 16, 2012.
  34. ^ Billy Dukes (August 14, 2012). "Taylor Swift, 'We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together' – Song Review". Taste of Country. Archived from the original on October 21, 2012. Retrieved August 26, 2012.
  35. ^ a b Camille Mann (August 31, 2012). "Taylor Swift releases music video for 'We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together'". CBS News. CBS Interactive Inc. Archived from the original on November 5, 2012. Retrieved August 31, 2012.
  36. ^ "50 Best Songs of 2012: Taylor Swift, 'We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together'". Rolling Stone. December 5, 2012. Archived from the original on November 5, 2017. Retrieved December 13, 2012.
  37. ^ "Top 10 Songs of 2012 Playlist". Time. December 4, 2012. Archived from the original on March 29, 2017. Retrieved December 13, 2012.
  38. ^ Smith, Caspar Llewellyn (December 13, 2012). "Best tracks of 2012: read the full list". The Guardian. Retrieved November 14, 2021.
  39. ^ "Singles — All Votes". The Village Voice. Archived from the original on May 13, 2017. Retrieved January 18, 2013.
  40. ^ "The 75 Best Songs of 2012". PopMatters. December 3, 2012. Archived from the original on December 6, 2012. Retrieved December 6, 2012.
  41. ^ "50 Best Tracks of 2012". NME. November 20, 2012. Retrieved November 14, 2021.
  42. ^ "Top 50 Songs of 2012". Consequence. December 7, 2012. Retrieved December 7, 2012.
  43. ^ Pitchfork Staff (August 18, 2014). "The 200 Best Tracks of the Decade So Far (2010-2014)". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on October 18, 2017. Retrieved October 18, 2017.
  44. ^ Taylor Swift (December 5, 2012). "Taylor Nominated For Three 2013 Grammy Awards". TaylorSwift.com. Archived from the original on December 9, 2012. Retrieved December 13, 2012.
  45. ^ "The 200 Best Songs of the 2010s". Stereogum. November 5, 2019. Archived from the original on November 5, 2019. Retrieved November 24, 2019.
  46. ^ Shaffer, Claire; Hudak, Joseph (December 17, 2019). "A Real Fine Place to Start: 20 Years of Country Hits by Women". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on December 18, 2019. Retrieved December 18, 2019.
  47. ^ Cridlin, Jay (December 31, 2019). "The best pop songs of the 2010s: Taylor Swift, Bruno Mars, Lorde, more". Tampa Bay Times. Retrieved October 1, 2021.
  48. ^ Lynch, Kevin (September 4, 2013). "Calvin Harris trumps Michael Jackson feat to join Taylor Swift, Rihanna and One Direction in Guinness World Records™ 2014 book". Guinness World Records. Archived from the original on June 22, 2015. Retrieved June 16, 2015.
  49. ^ "2013 ACM Awards: Nominees & Winners". Nash Country Weekly. April 7, 2013. Archived from the original on June 6, 2015. Retrieved June 14, 2015.
  50. ^ "2013 Billboard Music Awards winners and nominees — complete list". HitFix. May 19, 2013. Archived from the original on July 1, 2015. Retrieved June 15, 2015.
  51. ^ "Adam Levine and Top Songwriters Honored at 61st Annual BMI Pop Awards". Broadcast Music, Inc. May 15, 2013. Archived from the original on June 29, 2015. Retrieved January 25, 2015.
  52. ^ "CMT Music Awards: Archives: 2013 CMT Music Awards". CMT. Archived from the original on March 29, 2015. Retrieved January 25, 2015.
  53. ^ Greenburg, Zack O'Malley (February 11, 2013). "Grammy Winners 2013: The Full List". Forbes. Archived from the original on October 29, 2014. Retrieved January 25, 2015.
  54. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards Japan 2013" (in Japanese). MTV Japan. Archived from the original on February 18, 2015. Retrieved June 19, 2015.
  55. ^ Bevilacqua, Valerie (June 17, 2013). "MMVA 2013: Full List of Winners & Losers". Heavy.com. Archived from the original on June 26, 2015. Retrieved June 26, 2015.
  56. ^ "MYX Music Awards 2013 NOMINEES HERE!". MYX. Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved April 16, 2015.
  57. ^ "ORTC: Kids' Choice Awards 2013: Full List of Nominations". KABC-TV. Archived from the original on June 30, 2015. Retrieved June 23, 2015.
  58. ^ Alviti, Cintia (October 19, 2013). "* Premios Kids' Choice Awards Argentina 2013: Ganadores, lista completa: 18.10.13". El Bazar del Espect谩culo. Archived from the original on January 4, 2015. Retrieved January 25, 2015.
  59. ^ "People's Choice Awards: Fan Favorites in Movies, Music & TV". People's Choice Awards. Archived from the original on November 6, 2014. Retrieved January 25, 2015.
  60. ^ Ng, Philiana (February 27, 2013). "Selena Gomez to Headline Radio Disney Music Awards". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on June 26, 2015. Retrieved June 22, 2015.
  61. ^ "Radio Disney Music Awards winners list: One Direction, Taylor Swift, Selena Gomez, Justin Bieber and more". Sugar. April 28, 2013. Archived from the original on June 22, 2015. Retrieved June 22, 2015.
  62. ^ "Nominees/Winners". SiriusXM. Archived from the original on June 27, 2015. Retrieved June 21, 2015.
  63. ^ "2013 Teen Choice Awards: The Winners List". MTV. August 11, 2013. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved June 21, 2015.
  64. ^ Tinoco, Armando (July 17, 2013). "MTV Millennial Awards 2013: Lista completa de ganadores". Latin Times. Archived from the original on August 19, 2014. Retrieved January 25, 2015.
  65. ^ "Prêmios | Taylor Swift Brasil" (in Portuguese). Archived from the original on July 12, 2020. Retrieved July 13, 2020.
  66. ^ Nicholson, Jessica (December 14, 2012). "World Music Award Nominees Announced". MusicRow. Archived from the original on August 10, 2015. Retrieved June 20, 2015.
  67. ^ "Most Performed Songs". ASCAP. Archived from the original on January 27, 2016. Retrieved April 15, 2015.
  68. ^ "Stevie Nicks and Top Songwriters Honored at 62nd Annual BMI Pop Awards". Broadcast Music, Inc. May 14, 2014. Archived from the original on April 3, 2016. Retrieved May 11, 2016.
  69. ^ Caulfield, Keith (August 15, 2012). "Taylor Swift's New Single Debuts on Hot 100 – Sales Forecast Grows to Over 500,000". Billboard. Archived from the original on December 31, 2012. Retrieved August 15, 2012.
  70. ^ Trust, Gary (August 22, 2012). "Taylor Swift Scores First Hot 100 No. 1". Billboard. Archived from the original on February 13, 2013. Retrieved August 22, 2012.
  71. ^ Grein, Paul (August 20, 2012). "Week Ending Aug. 19, 2012. Songs: Swift Makes Digital History". Yahoo! Music. Archived from the original on March 12, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2012.
  72. ^ "Kelly Clarkson Talks About Topping the Hot 100 – Twice". Billboard. Archived from the original on July 9, 2013. Retrieved August 31, 2012.
  73. ^ Trust, Gary (September 12, 2012). "Taylor Swift's 'Never': Country Song With Most Weeks at No. 1 Since 1980". Billboard. Archived from the original on January 22, 2013. Retrieved September 12, 2012.
  74. ^ Grein, Paul (November 28, 2012). "Week Ending Nov. 25, 2012. Songs: Phillip Phillips Is 'Home'". Yahoo! Music. Archived from the original on January 20, 2013. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  75. ^ Trust, Gary (August 15, 2012). "Flo Rida's 'Whistle' Ends Carly Rae Jepsen's 'Call Me Maybe' Hot 100 Reign". Billboard. Archived from the original on October 22, 2012. Retrieved August 15, 2012.
  76. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Radio Songs)". Billboard. Archived from the original on February 27, 2021. Retrieved August 11, 2021.
  77. ^ Caulfield, Keith (August 21, 2012). "Official: Taylor Swift's 'Never' Song Sells 623,000; Sets Female Digital Record". Billboard. Archived from the original on May 28, 2013. Retrieved August 22, 2012.
  78. ^ Trust, Gary (November 2, 2015). "Adele Says 'Hello' to No. 1 Debut, First Song To Sell 1 Million Downloads in a Week". Billboard. Archived from the original on November 2, 2015. Retrieved November 2, 2015.
  79. ^ Jessen, Wade (August 20, 2012). "New Swift Single Poised to Make Digital Chart Debut" (PDF). Billboard. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 22, 2012. Retrieved August 20, 2012.
  80. ^ Pietroluongo, Silvio (October 11, 2012). "Taylor Swift, Rihanna & PSY Buoyed by Billboard Chart Changes". Billboard. Archived from the original on January 29, 2013. Retrieved October 11, 2012.
  81. ^ Aswad, Jem (August 22, 2014). "Are Taylor Swift and Country Splitting Up for Good?". Billboard. Archived from the original on August 24, 2014. Retrieved September 10, 2014.
  82. ^ Thanki, Juli (March 27, 2017). "Connie Smith's 'Once a Day' recording launched a legendary career". The Tennessean. Retrieved August 11, 2021.
  83. ^ Asker, Jim (April 6, 2021). "Taylor Swift Scores 25th Hot Country Songs Top 10 With 'You All Over Me'". Billboard. Archived from the original on April 16, 2021. Retrieved July 26, 2021.
  84. ^ Freeman, Jon (March 6, 2018). "How Bebe Rexha and Florida Georgia Line Broke a Country Chart Record". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on October 11, 2018. Retrieved December 31, 2018.
  85. ^ Rowlands, Geoffrey (December 10, 2018). "Exception to the country music rule". Gulf Times. Archived from the original on January 1, 2019. Retrieved December 31, 2018.
  86. ^ a b "Taylor Swift Chart History (Adult Contemporary)". Billboard. Retrieved August 20, 2012.
  87. ^ a b "Taylor Swift Chart History (Adult Pop Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  88. ^ a b "Taylor Swift Chart History (Pop Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  89. ^ Grein, Paul (October 3, 2012). "Week Ending Sept. 30, 2012. Songs: A Real Horserace For #1". Yahoo! Music. Archived from the original on November 12, 2014. Retrieved October 3, 2012.
  90. ^ Trust, Gary (July 14, 2019). "Ask Billboard: Taylor Swift's Career Sales & Streaming Totals, From 'Tim McGraw' to 'You Need to Calm Down'". Billboard. Archived from the original on July 15, 2019. Retrieved July 14, 2019.
  91. ^ a b "American single certifications – Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved May 17, 2018.
  92. ^ a b "Taylor Swift Chart History (Canadian Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved August 23, 2012.
  93. ^ a b "Canadian single certifications – Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together". Music Canada. Retrieved May 17, 2018.
  94. ^ a b "New Zealand single certifications – Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together". Recorded Music NZ. Retrieved May 17, 2018.
  95. ^ a b "Media Forest Week 49, 2012". Israeli Airplay Chart. Media Forest. Retrieved October 23, 2012.
  96. ^ a b "Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together". ARIA Top 50 Singles. Retrieved August 21, 2012.
  97. ^ a b "The Irish Charts – Search Results – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together". Irish Singles Chart. Retrieved January 29, 2020.
  98. ^ a b "Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved August 27, 2012.
  99. ^ a b "Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together". VG-lista. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  100. ^ a b "Archívum – Slágerlisták – MAHASZ" (in Hungarian). Rádiós Top 40 játszási lista. Magyar Hanglemezkiadók Szövetsége. Retrieved January 3, 2013.
  101. ^ a b "Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" Canciones Top 50. Retrieved October 23, 2012.
  102. ^ a b "Taylor Swift Chart History (Euro Digital Song Sales)". Billboard. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  103. ^ a b "Sverigetopplistan – Taylor Swift" (in Swedish). Sverigetopplistan.
  104. ^ a b "British single certifications – Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved May 17, 2018.
  105. ^ a b "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 2013 Singles" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved May 17, 2018.
  106. ^ Jones, Alan (October 27, 2014). "Official Charts Analysis: Trainor matches Clean Bandit for longest-running No.1 single of 2014". Music Week. Retrieved October 23, 2015.
  107. ^ Perone, James E. (2017). The Words and Music of Taylor Swift. ABC-Clio. p. 47. ISBN 978-1440852947.
  108. ^ a b "Japanese single digital certifications – Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" (in Japanese). Recording Industry Association of Japan. Retrieved June 26, 2020. Select 2015年1月 on the drop-down menu
  109. ^ Fauer, Jon (September 5, 2012). "Making of Taylor Swift's "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together"". Film and Digital Times. Archived from the original on June 2, 2021. Retrieved May 30, 2021.
  110. ^ Taylor Swift (August 28, 2012). "MTV Networks to Exclusively Premiere 'We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together' Music Video!". Taylorswift.com. Archived from the original on August 31, 2012. Retrieved August 28, 2012.
  111. ^ CMT (August 30, 2012). "Taylor Swift : We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together : Preview". YouTube. Google Inc. Archived from the original on January 12, 2021. Retrieved August 31, 2012.
  112. ^ Taylor Swift - We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together. YouTube. August 31, 2012. Retrieved March 6, 2016 – via YouTube.
  113. ^ MONTGOMERY, JAMES (September 1, 2012). "TAYLOR SWIFT WANTED 'NEVER EVER' VIDEO 'TO LOOK AS QUIRKY AS THE SONG SOUNDS'". Archived from the original on March 11, 2021. Retrieved June 22, 2018.
  114. ^ Randy Lewis (August 31, 2012). "Video: Taylor Swift's 'We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together'". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on September 30, 2012. Retrieved August 31, 2012.
  115. ^ James Montgomery (August 31, 2012). "Taylor Swift's 'Never Ever' Video And The History Of One-Take Clips". MTV. Archived from the original on March 14, 2014. Retrieved August 31, 2012.
  116. ^ Jim Farber (August 31, 2012). "Taylor Swift's 'We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together' video debuts, but sheds no light on identity of mysterious cad". Daily News. New York. Archived from the original on June 10, 2016. Retrieved August 31, 2012.
  117. ^ Carl Williott (August 30, 2012). "Taylor Swift's "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" Video: Watch The Steadicam Soiree". Idolator. Retrieved September 1, 2012.
  118. ^ "Taylor Swift's Adorkable 'We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together'". Rolling Stone. August 31, 2012. Archived from the original on September 1, 2012. Retrieved September 1, 2012.
  119. ^ David Greenwald (August 31, 2012). "Taylor Swift Debuts 'We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together' Video: Watch". Billboard. Archived from the original on October 29, 2020. Retrieved September 1, 2012.
  120. ^ Kara Warner and Katie Byrne (August 21, 2012). "Taylor Swift To Perform New Song For The First Time At VMAs!". MTV. Archived from the original on February 4, 2014. Retrieved August 21, 2012.
  121. ^ "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together (Live) | MTV". MTV. September 6, 2012. Archived from the original on September 9, 2012. Retrieved September 7, 2012.
  122. ^ "Taylor Swift ganha cavaquinho e leva hits ao palco do programa - TV Xuxa - Catálogo de Vídeos". Gshow.globo.com. Archived from the original on January 7, 2018. Retrieved January 6, 2018.
  123. ^ "Em seu primeiro show no Brasil, Taylor Swift canta sete sucessos e recebe Paula Fernandes". Miusica.uol.com.br. Archived from the original on January 7, 2018. Retrieved January 6, 2018.
  124. ^ Josh Darvill (October 5, 2012). "X Factor 2012: Taylor Swift to perform on October 14 live show". TellyMix. Glam Entertainment. Archived from the original on March 23, 2016. Retrieved December 13, 2012.
  125. ^ Taylor Swift (December 15, 2012). "Taylor Performs on Germany's Schlag Den Raab". taylorswift.com. Archived from the original on February 1, 2013. Retrieved December 20, 2012.
  126. ^ Lansky, Sam (January 25, 2013). "Taylor Swift Performs 'Love Story' & "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" At 40 Principales: Watch". Idolator. Archived from the original on January 13, 2016. Retrieved January 26, 2013.
  127. ^ "NRJ Music Awards 2013 : M. Pokora, Psy et Sexion d'Assaut, grands gagnants de la soirée". TF1 News (in French). January 26, 2013. Archived from the original on January 26, 2013. Retrieved January 26, 2013.
  128. ^ Iasimone, Ashley (December 8, 2019). "Taylor Swift Performs 'Christmas Tree Farm' Live for the First Time at Capital FM's Jingle Bell Ball: Watch". Billboard. Archived from the original on December 9, 2019. Retrieved December 9, 2019.
  129. ^ teddiefilms (October 18, 2012). "Taylor Swift + Breaking Bad Parody - 'We Are Never Ever Gonna Cook Together'". YouTube. Google Inc. Archived from the original on April 8, 2013. Retrieved April 8, 2013.
  130. ^ "'Grey's Anatomy' season 10 spoilers: More Amelia, and a Taylor Swift title?". CarterMatt.com. April 13, 2014. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  131. ^ "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together (Spoof) [feat. Wendy McColm] - Single". iTunes Store. September 8, 2012. Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved March 7, 2015.
  132. ^ "TAYLOR SWIFT *SPOOF* WE ARE NEVER EVER GETTING BACK TOGETHER!". YouTube. Archived from the original on May 14, 2015. Retrieved March 7, 2015.
  133. ^ Sky News Scotland Megamix - David Cameron Solo. YouTube. September 4, 2014. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  134. ^ We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together (CD single liner notes). Taylor Swift. Big Machine Records. 2012. 4393000703.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  135. ^ "Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" (in German). Ö3 Austria Top 40. Retrieved August 21, 2012.
  136. ^ "Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50. Retrieved August 21, 2012.
  137. ^ "Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" (in French). Ultratop 50. Retrieved August 21, 2012.
  138. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Canada AC)". Billboard. Retrieved November 24, 2013.
  139. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Canada Country)". Billboard. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  140. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Canada CHR/Top 40)". Billboard. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  141. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Canada Hot AC)". Billboard. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  142. ^ "ČNS IFPI" (in Czech). Hitparáda – Radio Top 100 Oficiální. IFPI Czech Republic. Note: Change the chart to CZ – RADIO – TOP 100 and insert 201238 into search. Retrieved October 23, 2012.
  143. ^ "Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together". Tracklisten. Retrieved August 26, 2012.
  144. ^ "Taylor Swift: We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" (in Finnish). Musiikkituottajat – IFPI Finland. Retrieved August 21, 2012.
  145. ^ "Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" (in French). Les classement single. Retrieved August 21, 2012.
  146. ^ "Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" (in German). GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved September 27, 2012.
  147. ^ "Top 50" (in Spanish). El Tiempo. October 4, 2012. Archived from the original on October 7, 2012. Retrieved October 24, 2012.
  148. ^ "Taylor Swift on the FIMI charts" (in Italian). Federazione Industria Musicale Italiana. Archived from the original on January 27, 2019. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  149. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Japan Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  150. ^ "Mexico Ingles Airplay". Billboard.
  151. ^ "Nederlandse Top 40 – Taylor Swift" (in Dutch). Dutch Top 40. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  152. ^ "Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" (in Dutch). Single Top 100. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  153. ^ "Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together". Top 40 Singles. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  154. ^ "ČNS IFPI" (in Slovak). Hitparáda – Radio Top 100 Oficiálna. IFPI Czech Republic. Note: insert 201243 into search. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  155. ^ 2012년 35주차 Digital Chart (in Korean). Gaon Music Chart. Archived from the original on May 15, 2021. Retrieved May 15, 2021.
  156. ^ Gaon Digital Chart 2012년 9월 1주차 (in Korean). Gaon Music Chart. Archived from the original on December 12, 2013. Retrieved December 12, 2013.
  157. ^ "Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together". Singles Top 100. Retrieved September 8, 2012.
  158. ^ "Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together". Swiss Singles Chart. Retrieved September 27, 2012.
  159. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved August 22, 2012.
  160. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Country Airplay)". Billboard. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  161. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Dance Mix/Show Airplay)". Billboard. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  162. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Hot Country Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved August 20, 2012.
  163. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Rhythmic)". Billboard. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  164. ^ "Top 100 Singles of 2012". ARIA Charts. Archived from the original on July 20, 2017. Retrieved May 4, 2013.
  165. ^ "Canadian Hot 100: 2012 Year-end Charts". Billboard. January 2, 2013. Archived from the original on August 14, 2020. Retrieved April 15, 2014.
  166. ^ "Japan Hot 100 Year End 2014". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 18, 2015. Retrieved April 28, 2015.
  167. ^ "Top 100-Jaaroverzicht van 2012". Dutch Top 40. Archived from the original on December 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2020.
  168. ^ "Top Selling Singles of 2012". Recorded Music NZ. Archived from the original on August 12, 2021. Retrieved August 11, 2021.
  169. ^ "Årslista Singlar – År 2012" (in Swedish). Sverigetopplistan. Archived from the original on February 24, 2020. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  170. ^ Lane, Dan (January 2, 2013). "The Official Top 40 Biggest Selling Singles Of 2012 Revealed!". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on October 7, 2014. Retrieved January 2, 2013.
  171. ^ "Best of 2012 – Hot 100 Songs". Billboard. Archived from the original on September 29, 2013. Retrieved December 14, 2012.
  172. ^ "Adult Contemporary Songs – Year-End 2012". Billboard. January 2, 2013. Archived from the original on November 6, 2019. Retrieved September 27, 2019.
  173. ^ "Adult Pop Songs – Year-End 2012". Billboard. January 2, 2013. Archived from the original on September 15, 2020. Retrieved September 27, 2019.
  174. ^ "Best of 2012: Hot Country Songs". Billboard. 2012. Archived from the original on May 25, 2013. Retrieved December 14, 2012.
  175. ^ "Pop Songs – Year-End 2012". Billboard. January 2, 2013. Archived from the original on September 20, 2020. Retrieved September 27, 2019.
  176. ^ "Best of 2013: Canadian Hot 100". Billboard. 2013. Archived from the original on December 18, 2013. Retrieved December 13, 2013.
  177. ^ "Top de l'année Top Singles 2013" (in French). Syndicat national de l'édition phonographique. Archived from the original on September 22, 2020. Retrieved July 6, 2020.
  178. ^ "Japan Hot 100 – Year-End 2013". Billboard. Archived from the original on December 22, 2013. Retrieved July 11, 2014.
  179. ^ "End of Year 2013" (PDF). UKChartsPlus. Archived (PDF) from the original on July 14, 2014. Retrieved June 7, 2014.
  180. ^ "Best of 2013: Hot Country Songs". Billboard. 2013. Archived from the original on December 15, 2015. Retrieved December 13, 2013.
  181. ^ "Japan Hot 100 Year End 2014". Billboard. Archived from the original on April 28, 2015. Retrieved April 28, 2015.
  182. ^ "Japan Hot 100 Year End 2015". Billboard. Archived from the original on December 14, 2015. Retrieved December 9, 2015.
  183. ^ "Decade-End Charts: Hot Country Songs". Billboard. Archived from the original on December 16, 2019. Retrieved February 3, 2020.
  184. ^ "Gold-/Platin-Datenbank (Taylor Swift; 'We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together')" (in German). Bundesverband Musikindustrie. Retrieved May 17, 2018.
  185. ^ "Italian single certifications – Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" (in Italian). Federazione Industria Musicale Italiana. Retrieved May 17, 2018. Select "2014" in the "Anno" drop-down menu. Select "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" in the "Filtra" field. Select "Singoli" under "Sezione".
  186. ^ "Certificaciones" (in Spanish). Asociación Mexicana de Productores de Fonogramas y Videogramas. Retrieved May 17, 2018. Type Taylor Swift in the box under the ARTISTA column heading and We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together in the box under TÍTULO
  187. ^ Combined sales figures for "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" in South Korea:
  188. ^ "Danish single certifications – Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back together". IFPI Danmark. Retrieved May 17, 2018.
  189. ^ "Japanese single streaming certifications – Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back together" (in Japanese). Recording Industry Association of Japan. Retrieved September 28, 2020. Select 2021年8月 on the drop-down menu
  190. ^ "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together". taylorswiftshop.com.au. Archived from the original on February 19, 2013. Retrieved January 8, 2013.
  191. ^ "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together – Single". United Kingdom: Apple Music. Archived from the original on August 19, 2012. Retrieved August 26, 2012.
  192. ^ "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together – Single" (in French). France: Apple Music. Archived from the original on August 22, 2012. Retrieved August 26, 2012.
  193. ^ "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together – Single" (in Japanese). Japan: Apple Music. Archived from the original on October 1, 2012. Retrieved August 26, 2012.
  194. ^ "Singles Release Diary". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on August 30, 2012. Retrieved August 30, 2012.
  195. ^ "Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together (Radio Date: 07/09/2012)" (in Italian). earone.it. Archived from the original on March 23, 2013. Retrieved September 7, 2012.
  196. ^ "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" (in German). Universal Music Germany. Archived from the original on March 5, 2021. Retrieved September 11, 2021.
  197. ^ Al-Heeti, Abrar (November 11, 2021). "Red (Taylor's Version): Release date, tracklist, why Taylor Swift is rerecording her albums". CNET. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  198. ^ "ARIA Top 50 Singles Chart". Australian Recording Industry Association. November 22, 2021. Retrieved November 19, 2021.
  199. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Canadian Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved November 23, 2021.
  200. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Global 200)". Billboard. Retrieved November 23, 2021.
  201. ^ "RIAS Top Charts Week 46 (12 - 18 Nov 2021)". November 23, 2021. Archived from the original on November 23, 2021. Retrieved November 23, 2021.
  202. ^ "Official Audio Streaming Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved November 19, 2021.
  203. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved November 23, 2021.
  204. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Hot Country Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved November 23, 2021.