We Are Young Money

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We Are Young Money
Young Money - We Are Young Money.png
Compilation album by Young Money
Released December 21, 2009
Recorded 2008–09
Genre
Length 65:12
Label
Producer
Young Money chronology
Young Money: The Mixtape Vol. 1'
(2005)
We Are Young Money
(2009)
Rich Gang
(2013)
Singles from We Are Young Money
  1. "Every Girl"
    Released: June 11, 2009
  2. "BedRock"
    Released: November 14, 2009
  3. "Roger That"
    Released: March 23, 2010

We Are Young Money is the first compilation album by American hip hop record label Young Money Entertainment, and released on December 21, 2009[1] by Young Money Entertainment and Cash Money Records. The album garnered a positive reception but critics were divided on the quality of the label's choice of artists. We Are Young Money debuted at number 9 on the Billboard 200 and spawned three singles: "Every Girl", "BedRock" and "Roger That". The album was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America for sales of over 500,000 copies in the United States.

Background[edit]

The album features contributions from Young Money artists Lil Wayne, Jae Millz, Gudda Gudda, Mack Maine, Drake, Tyga, T-Streets, Short Dawg, Shanell, Nicki Minaj, Lil Twist and Lil Chuckee. The album also features guest appearances from Birdman, Lloyd and Gucci Mane. The album's production was handled by Kane Beatz, Chase N. Cashe, Cool & Dre, David Banner, Infamous, Willy Will and DJ Mecca of The Audibles, among other high-profile record producers. Lil Wayne, the founder of the label, performs on all tracks, except "Girl I Got You". Lil Wayne has stated publicly that "Steady Mobbin" is his favorite song he's ever made.

Singles[edit]

"Every Girl" was released as the album's lead single on June 11, 2009; the song features Lil Wayne, Drake, Jae Millz, Gudda Gudda and Mack Maine. The song peaked at number 10 on the US Billboard Hot 100. "BedRock" was released as the album's second single on November 14, 2009; the song features Lil Wayne, Drake, Jae Millz, Gudda Gudda, Nicki Minaj, Tyga and Lloyd. The song has peaked at number 2 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart, and number 9 on the UK Singles Chart, making it the most commercially successful single. The two first singles proved to be hits on the charts and in the urban community. "Roger That" was released as the album's third single; the song features Lil Wayne, Nicki Minaj and Tyga. It was officially released to urban radio on March 23, 2010.[2]

Other songs[edit]

"Steady Mobbin'" peaked at number 48 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States. It has been stated on MTV News that Gucci Mane and Lil Wayne shot their scenes for the video separately. Wayne shot his parts two-hours before turning himself in to his one-year jail sentence, while Gucci shot his after his sentence was completed. The music video premiered on Sunday July 4, 2010 on MTV Jams.[3]

Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Aggregate scores
Source Rating
Metacritic 63/100[4]
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 3.5/5 stars[5]
The A.V. Club C[6]
HipHopDX 2.5/5 stars[7]
NOW 3/5 Ns[8]
Pitchfork Media 7.4/10[9]
RapReviews 7/10[10]
Rolling Stone 2.5/5 stars[11]
Toronto Star 2/4 stars[12]
XXL 3/5 stars[13]

We Are Young Money received generally favorable reviews from music critics but found the quality of the rappers' talents below average. At Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, the album received an average score of 63, based on 8 reviews.[4]

Steve 'Flash' Juon of RapReviews praised the production by Kane Beatz and Tha Bizness for providing the necessary energy but found the album filled with more Lil Wayne and less of his newly signed roster than needed, saying that "For the most part the charisma of Lil Wayne and Drake carries We Are Young Money even when the actual content does not. Occasionally Jae Millz or Mack Maine upstage everyone with a line or two but odds are if you buy We Are Young Money you're a Lil Wayne fan."[10] Ryan Dombal of Pitchfork Media said that Drake and Nicki Minaj elevate the material that contains high quality production, saying that "Along with its top tier talents, what keeps WAYM from slogging along is a stylistic diversity and a selection of beats that sometimes borders on phenomenal."[9] Chris Yuscavage of XXL praised the album for allowing new rappers to deliver workmanlike lyrics that rarely happen in similar projects, saying that "We Are Young Money—the first group project from Lil Wayne’s Young Money Entertainment—actually manages to help the YM roster make a solid first impression."[13] Joshua Errett of NOW found Minaj the only standout rapper on the album because of her idiosyncratic delivery, saying that "Her nonsensical punchlines and train-wreck flow have been accurately described as Lynchian - kooky and captivating."[8]

Nathan Rabin of The A.V. Club found the album's lyrical content and roster of rappers tiring and lacking in staying power, concluding that "Money is pure bubblegum, the kind of instantly disposable pop ephemera listeners forget about while it’s still playing."[6] Kathy Iandoli of HipHopDX found the album too Wayne-heavy and doesn't give enough time for the new rappers to leave an impression, saying that "The problem here is that unlike past posse introductory albums (see Wu-Tang Clan’s Enter The 36 Chambers), there isn’t a level playing field where everyone has an equal opportunity to become a star. The individual successes of Wayne, Drake, and Nicki alone make a compilation like this too late for them and too early for the rest."[7] Christian Hoard of Rolling Stone felt the album lacked balance in showcasing new artists, saying that "It's inconsistent, veering from Drake (always solid, but distracted here) to very average MCs like Gudda Gudda."[11] Ashante Infantry of the Toronto Star said that despite appearances from Drake and Nicki Minaj, the rest of the label roster proved mediocre in delivering verses, saying that "[I]t's difficult to establish identity in an ensemble cast and even tougher with the limited, profane agenda – money, groupies, cars – outlined in songs like 'Fuck Da Bullshit' and 'New Shit'."[12]

Commercial performance[edit]

We Are Young Money debuted at number 9 on the US Billboard 200 chart, selling 142,000 copies in its first-week sales.[14] The album was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for selling over a shipments of 500,000 copies in the United States.[15]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Producer(s) Length
1. "Gooder" (Jae Millz, Gudda Gudda, Mack Maine and Lil Wayne) Cool & Dre 4:26
2. "Every Girl" (Lil Wayne, Drake, Jae Millz, Gudda Gudda and Mack Maine) Tha Bizness 5:13
3. "Ms. Parker" (Lil Wayne, Mack Maine and Gudda Gudda) Tha Bizness 5:19
4. "Wife Beater" (Jae Millz, Tyga, T-Streets, Mack Maine and Lil Wayne) Kane Beatz 4:43
5. "New Shit" (Gudda Gudda, Jae Millz, Mack Maine and Lil Wayne)
3:31
6. "Pass the Dutch" (Lil Wayne, Gudda Gudda and Drake featuring Short Dawg)
  • Chase N. Cashe
  • B. Carr
5:06
7. "Play in My Band" (Shanell and Lil Wayne) Willy Will 4:08
8. "Fuck da Bullshit" (Nicki Minaj, Gudda Gudda, Lil Wayne and Drake featuring Birdman)
  • Chase N. Cashe
  • Andrew "Pop" Wansel
3:07
9. "BedRock" (Lil Wayne, Gudda Gudda, Nicki Minaj, Drake, Tyga and Jae Millz featuring Lloyd) Kane Beatz 4:48
10. "Girl, I Got You" (Lil Twist and Lil Chuckee)
3:19
11. "Steady Mobbin'" (Lil Wayne featuring Gucci Mane) Kane Beatz 5:11
12. "Roger That" (Lil Wayne, Tyga and Nicki Minaj) Phenom 3:30
13. "She Is Gone" (T-Streets, Jae Millz, Lil Wayne and Gudda Gudda) Kane Beatz 3:50
14. "Streets Is Watchin'" (Lil Wayne, Gudda Gudda, Jae Millz, Nicki Minaj and T-Streets) David Banner 3:41
15. "Finale" (T-Streets, Gudda Gudda, Jae Millz, Tyga, Lil Chuckee, Lil Twist, Nicki Minaj, Shanell, Mack Maine, Drake and Lil Wayne)
5:22
Total length:
65:12
Sample credits

Chart positions[edit]

Chart (2009) Peak
position
US Billboard 200 9
US Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums (Billboard) 3
US Top Rap Albums (Billboard) 1

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (2010) Position
US Billboard 200 86[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lil Wayne & Young Money Albums Pushed Back. Rap-Up. Accessed November 20, 2009.
  2. ^ FMWB.com
  3. ^ Worldstarhiphop.com
  4. ^ a b "Reviews for We Are Young Money by Young Money". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved April 13, 2016. 
  5. ^ Jeffries, David. "We Are Young Money - Young Money". AllMusic. All Media Network. Retrieved December 7, 2010. 
  6. ^ a b Rabin, Nathan (January 12, 2010). "Young Money: We Are Young Money". The A.V. Club. The Onion. Retrieved April 13, 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Iandoli, Kathy (December 20, 2009). "Young Money - We Are Young Money". HipHopDX. Cheri Media Group. Retrieved December 7, 2010. 
  8. ^ a b Errett, Joshua (January 13, 2010). "Young Money - We Are Young Money (Cash Money/Young Money/Universal Motown)". NOW. NOW Communications. Retrieved April 13, 2016. 
  9. ^ a b Dombal, Ryan (January 8, 2010). "Young Money: We Are Young Money". Pitchfork Media. Retrieved December 7, 2010. 
  10. ^ a b Juon, Steve 'Flash' (December 22, 2009). "Young Money :: We Are Young Money :: Cash Money/Universal Motown". RapReviews. Retrieved December 7, 2010. 
  11. ^ a b Hoard, Christian (January 19, 2010). "We Are Young Money Review". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media. Archived from the original on January 25, 2010. Retrieved December 7, 2010. 
  12. ^ a b Infantry, Ashante (December 22, 2009). "CD reviews". Toronto Star. Torstar. Retrieved December 7, 2010. 
  13. ^ a b Yuscavage, Chris (December 22, 2009). "Young Money, We Are Young Money [Review]". XXL. Townsquare Media. Retrieved April 13, 2016. 
  14. ^ http://www.xxlmag.com/news/latest-headlines/2009/12/young-money-racks-up-142k-in-first-week-sales-127k-eminem-fans-order-refill/
  15. ^ "American album certifications – Young Money – We Are Young Money". Recording Industry Association of America. May 24, 2010. Retrieved October 10, 2011.  If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH
  16. ^ "Best of 2010 - Billboard Top 200". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. Retrieved December 31, 2010.