Weavers Needle

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Weavers Needle
Weavers Needle-Peralta view.jpg
Highest point
Elevation 4,555 ft (1,388 m)  NAVD 88[1]
Prominence 993 ft (303 m) [1]
Coordinates 33°25′59″N 111°22′13″W / 33.4331056°N 111.3704066°W / 33.4331056; -111.3704066Coordinates: 33°25′59″N 111°22′13″W / 33.4331056°N 111.3704066°W / 33.4331056; -111.3704066[2]
Geography
Weavers Needle is located in Arizona
Weavers Needle
Weavers Needle
Location Pinal County, Arizona, U.S.
Parent range Superstition Mountains
Topo map USGS Weavers Needle
Weavers Needle from Peralta Canyon

Weavers Needle is a 1,000-foot-high (300 m) column of rock that forms a distinctive peak visible for many miles around. Located in the Superstition Mountains east of Phoenix, Arizona, Weavers Needle was created when a thick layer of tuff (fused volcanic ash) was heavily eroded, creating the spire as an erosional remnant with a summit elevation of 4,555 feet (1,388 m). It is set in a desert landscape of cactus and mesquite bush, with large Saguaro cacti particularly prominent. The peak was named after mountain man Pauline Weaver.

Weavers Needle has played a significant role in the stories of the Lost Dutchman's Gold Mine. The Needle's shadow reportedly indicates the location of a rich vein of gold, and many treasure hunters have searched for it. The hunt for gold around Weavers Needle has been pursued by hundreds (possibly thousands) of people. Weavers Needle has a large split in the side that makes it look like it has two tops, not one. This can only be viewed from the side.

Weaver's Needle can be climbed as a four-pitch route. Each of the pitches is rated a 5.0 or less, with the second pitch being more of a class 4 scramble. The route is trad, and opportunities for protection with traditional gear are ample. No permit is required to hike to Weaver's Needle, or to climb, or to camp at the top. Highly experienced climbers will often free-solo, and rappel from the fixed anchors at the top. Despite the relatively low rating of the climb, this is not recommended for beginner or intermediate climbers. [3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Weavers Needle, Arizona". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2014-02-09. 
  2. ^ "Weavers Needle". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2014-02-09. 
  3. ^ "Weavers Needle West Chimney". MountainProject. Retrieved 2016-07-19. 

External links[edit]