Weber City, Virginia

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Weber City, Virginia
Railroad tracks and businesses along US 23 in Weber City
Railroad tracks and businesses along US 23 in Weber City
Location of Weber City, Virginia
Location of Weber City, Virginia
Coordinates: 36°37′24″N 82°33′40″W / 36.62333°N 82.56111°W / 36.62333; -82.56111Coordinates: 36°37′24″N 82°33′40″W / 36.62333°N 82.56111°W / 36.62333; -82.56111
CountryUnited States
StateVirginia
CountyScott
Area
 • Total1.72 sq mi (4.47 km2)
 • Land1.71 sq mi (4.43 km2)
 • Water0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation
1,306 ft (398 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total1,327
 • Estimate 
(2017)[2]
1,235
 • Density721.80/sq mi (278.61/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP code
24290
Area code(s)276
FIPS code51-83808[3]
GNIS feature ID1476430[4]

Weber City is an incorporated town in Scott County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,327 at the 2010 census. It is part of the KingsportBristol (TN)Bristol (VA) Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is a component of the Johnson City–Kingsport–Bristol, TN-VA Combined Statistical Area – commonly known as the "Tri-Cities" region.

Name

Weber City is unique in how it received its name. The area was known as "Moccasin Gap" after the local gap that US 23 runs through. Local businessman Frank Parker, Sr., heard the future name on the Amos 'n' Andy radio show during a skit involving the upscale real estate development of "Weber City." As a joke, Parker erected a sign outside his service station on US 23 that read "Welcome to Weber City." However, by the time the town was incorporated in 1954, the area had become known locally as "Weber City." As such, the name was chosen for the new town.[5]

Geography

Weber City is located at 36°37′24″N 82°33′40″W / 36.62333°N 82.56111°W / 36.62333; -82.56111 (36.623284, −82.561039).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.1 square miles (2.8 km2), all land.

Weber City is located on the southern side of Moccasin Gap, a natural break in the mountains caused by Big Moccasin Creek, which was used by pioneers headed into Tennessee. To the south of Weber City, another gap leads into Tennessee. US 23 is the main road through Weber City and a primary north/south corridor for western Virginia.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
19601,274
19701,67631.6%
19801,543−7.9%
19901,377−10.8%
20001,333−3.2%
20101,327−0.5%
Est. 20171,235[2]−6.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 1,333 people, 605 households, and 382 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,170.5 people per square mile (451.5/km²). There were 689 housing units at an average density of 605.0 per square mile (233.4/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.35% White, 0.90% African American, 0.08% Native American, 0.30% from other races, and 0.38% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.30% of the population.

There were 605 households out of which 20.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.4% were married couples living together, 12.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.7% were non-families. 34.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.08 and the average family size was 2.64.

In the town, the population was spread out with 16.7% under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 22.4% from 25 to 44, 25.3% from 45 to 64, and 27.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47 years. For every 100 females, there were 78.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 76.5 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $25,744, and the median income for a family was $35,833. Males had a median income of $33,958 versus $21,726 for females. The per capita income for the town was $15,856. About 11.1% of families and 14.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.9% of those under age 18 and 10.4% of those age 65 or over.

References

  1. ^ "2017 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Mar 28, 2019.
  2. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ "Obituary of Frank Parker, Sr.," Kingsport Times, 27 April 1966, p. 5.
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  7. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.

External links