Weber Thompson

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Weber Thompson
Weber Thompson logo.svg
Practice information
Partners
  • Blaine Weber
  • Kristen Scott
  • Scott Thompson (retired)
  • Amanda Keating
  • Jeff Reibman
  • Elizabeth Holland
Founders
  • Scott Thompson
  • Blaine Weber
  • Jeffrey Hamlett
Founded 1987
No. of employees 70
Location Seattle, Washington, United States
Coordinates 47°37′14″N 122°20′15″W / 47.62055556°N 122.33750000°W / 47.62055556; -122.33750000Coordinates: 47°37′14″N 122°20′15″W / 47.62055556°N 122.33750000°W / 47.62055556; -122.33750000
Significant works and honors
Buildings Cirrus, Fifteen Twenty-One Second Avenue, Premiere on Pine
Website
weberthompson.com

Weber Thompson is an architecture firm based in Seattle, Washington. The firm, which comprises over 70 architects, and primarily works with high-rise buildings, interior design, and landscape architecture. Weber Thompson also specializes in commercial office, affordable housing and sustainable design, with 17 projects earning LEED certification.[1]

History[edit]

The firm was founded by Scott Thompson, Blaine Weber, and Jeffrey Hamlett in 1987 as Weber Thompson Hamlett Architects. Thompson and Weber had met in Hawaii, sharing an interest in surfing, and graduated from the architecture program together at the University of Hawaii.[2] Hamlett, who was also an attorney, later moved away from the company to establish a law practice for architectural contracts.[3] Kristen Scott became the firm's third principal in 1996, three years after joining the firm as an associate.[4]

In April 2008, Weber Thompson moved its headquarters to The Terry Thomas Building in Seattle's South Lake Union neighborhood;[5] the building, designed in-house by the firm, is LEED Platinum certified and was planned with sustainable design features.[6][7]

During the late-2000s recession, the number of employees at Weber Thompson dropped from 94 in early 2007 to 54 by late 2008,[8] following similar trends that affected other architecture firms in the region.[9]

Scott Thompson retired in 2015,[2] and was replaced by new promoted partners, Amanda Keating AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Jeff Reibman AIA, LEED AP BD+C, and Elizabeth Holland MBA, LEED AP.[10][11]

Notable projects[edit]

Fifteen Twenty-One Second Avenue, a residential skyscraper in Seattle designed by Weber Thompson
Completed high-rise buildings
Other competed projects
Under construction, planned or proposed projects

Awards and recognition[edit]

Weber Thompson was named one of the top 100 U.S. firms designing residential projects in 2015 by Interior Design magazine.[16]

Weber Thompson ranks 16th in the 2016 Building Design + Construction's Top 110 Multifamily Architects List.[17]

Weber Thompson has been listed in the 2016 PSMJ Circle of Excellence, earning the firm a Platinum Award.[18]

Weber Thompson listed among Architect Magazine's 2016 Top 50 firms in the nation.[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sustainabiliteam". Weber Thompson. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  2. ^ a b Stiles, Marc (June 16, 2015). "Weber Thompson bids 'aloha' to co-founder Scott Thompson". Puget Sound Business Journal. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  3. ^ "A Toast to Scott Thompson". Weber Thompson Blog. Weber Thompson. September 24, 2015. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  4. ^ Smith, Rob (September 16, 2001). "Accidentally following in father's footsteps not such a bad thing". Puget Sound Business Journal. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  5. ^ Gamache, Shawna (April 17, 2008). "Weber Thompson's new office: light, air and sometimes shorts". Seattle Daily Journal of Commerce. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  6. ^ "Terry Thomas encourages tenants to cut energy use". Seattle Daily Journal of Commerce. March 5, 2014. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  7. ^ "Weber Thompson's Office Receives Rare Honor: LEED Platinum Certification" (Press release). Weber Thompson. March 17, 2009. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  8. ^ Dietrich, Heidi (January 28, 2007). "Weber + Thompson adds 9 principals due to growth". Puget Sound Business Journal. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  9. ^ Pryne, Eric (November 29, 2008). "Stalled economy may idle Seattle-area architects". The Seattle Times. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  10. ^ "Weber Thompson bids 'aloha' to co-founder Scott Thompson - Puget Sound Business Journal". Puget Sound Business Journal. Retrieved 2016-04-01.
  11. ^ "Weber Thompson". Seattle Daily Journal of Commerce. February 3, 2016. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  12. ^ Cheek, Lawrence W. (September 10, 2015). "Very vertical Seattle: The city builds up to create more homes downtown". The Seattle Times. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  13. ^ Stiles, Marc (December 16, 2014). "Curtain rises on 40-story Premiere on Pine luxury apartment tower in Seattle". Puget Sound Business Journal. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  14. ^ Cheek, Lawrence (April 24, 2006). "On Architecture: The problem with most high-rises is how well they reach the street". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  15. ^ "SHA opens 83 more apartments and a hillclimb at Yesler Terrace". Seattle Daily Journal of Commerce. February 2, 2016. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  16. ^ "Weber Thompson in ID's top 100". Seattle Daily Journal of Commerce. January 27, 2016. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  17. ^ "Top 110 Multifamily Architecture Firms". Building Design + Construction. Retrieved 2016-12-12.
  18. ^ "Top Performing 2016 Circle of Excellence Firms - PSMJ". PSMJ. Retrieved 2016-12-12.
  19. ^ "The 2016 Architect 50". Architect. Retrieved 2016-12-12.

External links[edit]