Forcepoint: Difference between revisions

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(ThreatSeeker technology)
(clarified and corrected some verbs that show bias in the article, also added web security gateway that they announced this year)
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| company_name = Websense Inc.
 
| company_name = Websense Inc.
 
| company_logo = [[Image:Websense logo.jpg]]
 
| company_logo = [[Image:Websense logo.jpg]]
| company_type = [[Web filtering]] and [[Information Leak Prevention]]
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| company_type = Web Security Gateway, [[Web filtering]] and [[Information Leak Prevention]]
 
| foundation = 1994
 
| foundation = 1994
 
| location = [[San Diego]], [[California]]
 
| location = [[San Diego]], [[California]]
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| operating_income =
 
| operating_income =
 
| net_income =
 
| net_income =
| num_employees =
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| num_employees = 1,200
 
| parent =
 
| parent =
 
| subsid =
 
| subsid =
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[[Image:Websense blocking amnesty.org.png|thumb|251px|Websense classifies websites and allows customers to block access to certain categories of websites. Here it is restricting http://amnesty.org/ because it was setup to filter the category "Advocacy Groups".]]
 
[[Image:Websense blocking amnesty.org.png|thumb|251px|Websense classifies websites and allows customers to block access to certain categories of websites. Here it is restricting http://amnesty.org/ because it was setup to filter the category "Advocacy Groups".]]
   
'''Websense''' is a [[San Diego, California]]-based company which produces web filtering software, also known as Internet [[content-control software]] of the same name. The blockage created by this software has led to the creation of the word "websensed". The company also provides customers with [[Information Leak Prevention]] software, technology the company acquired in January 2007 from PortAuthority Technologies. While it is aimed at businesses and other large entities (such as governments, for their employees), it also sees use in [[libraries]] and [[schools]]. It has come under criticism from civil liberties groups on grounds that it restricts the free flow of speech.<ref>[http://peacefire.org/censorware/WebSENSE/ Peacefire WebSENSE Examined]</ref> The company was founded by Phil Trubey in 1994 <ref name="founder">{{cite web | url = http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-28681445_ITM | work = San Diego Business Journal | title = He's All Business On the Internet, Phil Trubey Unveils His Latest Venture Even Though He Could Retire Today | date = 2000-12-11 | accessdate = 2008-08-04}}</ref> and went public in 2000. <ref name="founder"> Its tagline is "Securing Productivity," reflecting one of the three main concerns prompting installation of its filtering software: (1) legal liability, (2) bandwidth, and (3) productivity.<ref>[http://www.websense.com/global/en/ResourceCenter/ProductSolutions/WebFiltering.php Websense: web filtering]</ref>
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'''Websense''' is a [[San Diego, California]]-based company which produces Web security gateway software, including Web filtering, also known as Internet [[content-control software]] of the same name, email security, and data loss prevention technology. What Websense is best known for is blocking access to Web sites. The blockage created by this software has led to the creation of the word "websensed." The company's [[Information Leak Prevention]] software, technology the company acquired in January 2007 from PortAuthority Technologies, is market-leading according to analyst firms. While Websense is aimed at businesses and other large entities (such as governments, for their employees), it also sees use in [[libraries]] and [[schools]]. It has come under criticism from civil liberties groups on grounds that it restricts the free flow of speech.<ref>[http://peacefire.org/censorware/WebSENSE/ Peacefire WebSENSE Examined]</ref> The company was founded by Phil Trubey in 1994 <ref name="founder">{{cite web | url = http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-28681445_ITM | work = San Diego Business Journal | title = He's All Business On the Internet, Phil Trubey Unveils His Latest Venture Even Though He Could Retire Today | date = 2000-12-11 | accessdate = 2008-08-04}}</ref> and went public in 2000. <ref name="founder"> Its tagline is "Securing Productivity," reflecting one of the three main concerns prompting installation of its filtering software: (1) legal liability, (2) bandwidth, and (3) productivity.<ref>[http://www.websense.com/global/en/ResourceCenter/ProductSolutions/WebFiltering.php Websense: web filtering]</ref>
   
 
==Technologies inside Websense==
 
==Technologies inside Websense==
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==Criticism==
 
==Criticism==
Some anti-censorship groups and human rights organizations claim that Websense is censoring free speech in countries with limited civil liberties<ref>[http://www.peacefire.org/amnesty-intercepted/ Amnesty Intercepted]:
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Some anti-censorship groups and human rights organizations claim (but have not proven) that Websense is censoring free speech in countries with limited civil liberties<ref>[http://www.peacefire.org/amnesty-intercepted/ Amnesty Intercepted]:
 
Global human rights groups blocked by Web censoring software</ref>. Websense can also be seen as discriminatory for blocking categories such as education, religion, health and non-pornographic homosexual content.
 
Global human rights groups blocked by Web censoring software</ref>. Websense can also be seen as discriminatory for blocking categories such as education, religion, health and non-pornographic homosexual content.
   
According to the [[OpenNet Initiative]], Websense is used by [[ISP|internet service providers]] in [[Yemen]]<ref>[http://www.opennetinitiative.net/studies/yemen/ Internet Filtering in Yemen in 2004-2005: A Country Study]</ref> as part of the government enforced censorship program. It is also used in [[China]] according to [[Amnesty international]] <ref>[http://web.amnesty.org/library/Index/ENGASA170012004 China: Controls tighten as Internet activism grows]</ref>.
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The [[OpenNet Initiative]] claims Websense is used by [[ISP|internet service providers]] in [[Yemen]]<ref>[http://www.opennetinitiative.net/studies/yemen/ Internet Filtering in Yemen in 2004-2005: A Country Study]</ref> as part of the government enforced censorship program. It is also used in [[China]] according to [[Amnesty international]] <ref>[http://web.amnesty.org/library/Index/ENGASA170012004 China: Controls tighten as Internet activism grows]</ref>.
   
 
On a 2005 report, Rhode Island affiliate of [[ACLU]] calls Websense a deeply flawed technology. <ref name="riaclu" /> It also mentions the 2001 Peacefire's report on the inaccuracy of the software, and notes that the [[Children's Internet Protection Act]] (CIPA) was struck down on 2002 by a federal court in a decision that was partly based on similar reports. <ref name="riaclu" /> It further notes that, although the blocking technology has improved over the years since 2002 it still remains a "blunt instrument" and that, on public libraries using Websense, people of all ages "are still denied access to a wide range of legitimate material". <ref name="riaclu">{{cite web | url = http://www.riaclu.org/20050418.html | title = R.I. ACLU releases report on "troubling" internet censorship in public libraries | author = The Rhode Island affiliate, American Civil Liberties Union | date = April 2005 | accessdate = 2009-06-26 }}<br>* [http://www.riaclu.org/friendly/documents/2005libraryinternetreport.pdf full report]</ref>
 
On a 2005 report, Rhode Island affiliate of [[ACLU]] calls Websense a deeply flawed technology. <ref name="riaclu" /> It also mentions the 2001 Peacefire's report on the inaccuracy of the software, and notes that the [[Children's Internet Protection Act]] (CIPA) was struck down on 2002 by a federal court in a decision that was partly based on similar reports. <ref name="riaclu" /> It further notes that, although the blocking technology has improved over the years since 2002 it still remains a "blunt instrument" and that, on public libraries using Websense, people of all ages "are still denied access to a wide range of legitimate material". <ref name="riaclu">{{cite web | url = http://www.riaclu.org/20050418.html | title = R.I. ACLU releases report on "troubling" internet censorship in public libraries | author = The Rhode Island affiliate, American Civil Liberties Union | date = April 2005 | accessdate = 2009-06-26 }}<br>* [http://www.riaclu.org/friendly/documents/2005libraryinternetreport.pdf full report]</ref>

Revision as of 01:58, 27 August 2008

Websense Inc.
Web Security Gateway, Web filtering and Information Leak Prevention
Founded1994
HeadquartersSan Diego, California
Key people
Phil Trubey, founder
Number of employees
1,200
Websitehttp://www.websense.com/
File:Websense blocking amnesty.org.png
Websense classifies websites and allows customers to block access to certain categories of websites. Here it is restricting http://amnesty.org/ because it was setup to filter the category "Advocacy Groups".

Websense is a San Diego, California-based company which produces Web security gateway software, including Web filtering, also known as Internet content-control software of the same name, email security, and data loss prevention technology. What Websense is best known for is blocking access to Web sites. The blockage created by this software has led to the creation of the word "websensed." The company's Information Leak Prevention software, technology the company acquired in January 2007 from PortAuthority Technologies, is market-leading according to analyst firms. While Websense is aimed at businesses and other large entities (such as governments, for their employees), it also sees use in libraries and schools. It has come under criticism from civil liberties groups on grounds that it restricts the free flow of speech.[1] The company was founded by Phil Trubey in 1994 [2] and went public in 2000. Cite error: A <ref> tag is missing the closing </ref> (see the help page).

Technologies inside Websense

Reporting tools

Websense does not merely filter users' Internet use – it also tracks it. According to the company website, "Included at no extra charge with all Websense products" are tools for "comprehensive reporting on the endpoint" with drill-down features to "access data by risk class, category, URL, application, user, workstation, dates, and more."[3] Thus, it is quite easy for administrators to see exactly what users are doing on the Internet.

Categories

Websense is designed to allow system administrators to block access to web sites (and other protocols) based on categories. These categories contain lists of sites that can be blocked. Separate categories can be blocked at all times or only during certain times of the day. The software also allows organizations to offer a "continue button," which allows users to go to a blocked category if it is work related.[4]

ThreatSeeker technology

In October 2006, Websense publicly unveiled its ThreatSeeker technology, which scans websites to find security threats on the Internet. The technology powers its Websense Security Suite software.

PreciseID

PreciseID uses technology initially developed for the Israeli military to track the whereabouts and distribution of data[5].

Deep Content Control

Websense's proprietary Deep Content Control aims to monitor and control "Who and What goes Where and How" in an effort to protect confidential information. Websense's website only notes that it is a combination of the ThreatSeeker and PreciseID technologies.[6]

Criticism

Some anti-censorship groups and human rights organizations claim (but have not proven) that Websense is censoring free speech in countries with limited civil liberties[7]. Websense can also be seen as discriminatory for blocking categories such as education, religion, health and non-pornographic homosexual content.

The OpenNet Initiative claims Websense is used by internet service providers in Yemen[8] as part of the government enforced censorship program. It is also used in China according to Amnesty international [9].

On a 2005 report, Rhode Island affiliate of ACLU calls Websense a deeply flawed technology. [10] It also mentions the 2001 Peacefire's report on the inaccuracy of the software, and notes that the Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA) was struck down on 2002 by a federal court in a decision that was partly based on similar reports. [10] It further notes that, although the blocking technology has improved over the years since 2002 it still remains a "blunt instrument" and that, on public libraries using Websense, people of all ages "are still denied access to a wide range of legitimate material". [10]

In December 2006 the company acquired the Israeli data security company PortAuthority for $90 million. [11][12] Announcing the take-over, WebSENSE said that it was "committed to maintaining the company's research and development presence in Israel." [11] In November 2007 web-users began reporting that WebSENSE was blocking within the US and the UK their access to the blog site of Noam Chomsky and to the website of Norman Finkelstein, prominent academics known for their criticism of the state of Israel.[13]

References

  1. ^ Peacefire WebSENSE Examined
  2. ^ "He's All Business On the Internet, Phil Trubey Unveils His Latest Venture Even Though He Could Retire Today". San Diego Business Journal. 2000-12-11. Retrieved 2008-08-04.
  3. ^ Websense: reporting tools
  4. ^ Websense: list of the categories used to classify the URLs
  5. ^ Websense: PreciseID
  6. ^ Websense: Deep Content Control
  7. ^ Amnesty Intercepted: Global human rights groups blocked by Web censoring software
  8. ^ Internet Filtering in Yemen in 2004-2005: A Country Study
  9. ^ China: Controls tighten as Internet activism grows
  10. ^ a b c The Rhode Island affiliate, American Civil Liberties Union (April 2005). "R.I. ACLU releases report on "troubling" internet censorship in public libraries". Retrieved 2009-06-26.
    * full report
  11. ^ a b Israel-Times.com Websense to acquire portauthority for 90 million in cash (broken link 26/Feb/2008)
  12. ^ Robert McMillan, IDG News Service (2006-12-20). "Websense to buy PortAuthority". InfoWorld. Retrieved 2008-08-04.
  13. ^ Reader letters: reply from Websense stating that www.normanfinkelstein.com has been reviewed and now categorised as 'News and Media'

External links