Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics

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Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics
Logo of the Wellcome Center for Human Genetics.png
Parent institutionUniversity of Oxford
Wellcome Trust
Established1994; 24 years ago (1994)
DirectorPeter Donnelly
Staff470
Key peopleYvonne Jones (deputy director)
Formerly calledWellcome Trust Center for Human Genetics
LocationHenry Wellcome Building of Genomic Medicine, Oxford
Coordinates51°45′08″N 1°12′55″W / 51.752248°N 1.215255°W / 51.752248; -1.215255Coordinates: 51°45′08″N 1°12′55″W / 51.752248°N 1.215255°W / 51.752248; -1.215255
Websitewww.well.ox.ac.uk

The Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics is a human genetics research centre at the University of Oxford, funded by the Wellcome Trust among others.[1]

Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine

Facilities & rescources[edit]

The centre is located at the Henry Wellcome Building of Genomic Medicine, which cost £20 million and was officially opened in June 2000 with Anthony Monaco as the director.[2][3]

Within the WHG a numer of 'cores' provide services to the researchers:

Oxford Genomics Centre[edit]

The Oxford Genomics Center provides high throughput sequencing services, using Illumina HiSeq4000 2500 and NextSeq500 and MiSeq.[4] They also offer Oxford Nanopore MinION and PromethION sequencing.[4] There are also Array platforms for genotyping, gene expresison, and methylation including Illuminia Infinium, Affymetrix and Fluidigm.[5]

Research Computing Core[edit]

The Research Computing Core provides access to compute resources including 4120 cores and 4.2 PB of storage.[6]

Transgenics[edit]

The transgenic core provides access to genetically modified mice and cell lines.[7]

Cellular Imaging[edit]

Cellular Imaging Core provides microscopy facilities including fluorescence microscopy (including Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS), Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRF), Photoactivated Localisation Microscopy (PALM), Spectral Imaging (SI) and Single Particle Tracking (SPT).[8]

Research[edit]

Statistical and population genetics[edit]

The WHG has been involved in many international statistical genetics advances including the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortia (WTCCC, WTCCC2), the 1000 Genomes Project and the International HapMap Project.[9]

Key people[edit]

Besides the director and deputy director, other key people involved in the WTCHG include Chris Holmes, Gilean McVean, Anthony Monaco, Richard Mott, David Ian Stuart and Hugh Christian Watkins.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Home - Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics". www.well.ox.ac.uk.
  2. ^ Farrar, Steve (2000). "Vanguard digs deep into data at Oxford". Times Higher Education. Retrieved 19 December 2011.[dead link]
  3. ^ Ramagopalan, S. V. (2008). "Life on top—working@ the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics: Scotland Yard for DNA detectives". New Biotechnology. 25 (1): 39–45. doi:10.1016/j.nbt.2008.04.007. PMID 18504015.
  4. ^ a b "Sequencing - Oxford Genomics Centre". Oxford Genomics Centre. Retrieved 2017-12-01.
  5. ^ "Arrays - Oxford Genomics Centre". Oxford Genomics Centre. Retrieved 2017-12-01.
  6. ^ DDN Storage (2016-11-02), Making high-performance compute appropriate to population-scale biomedical data, retrieved 2017-12-01
  7. ^ "Transgenics Core". Retrieved 2017-12-01.
  8. ^ "Cellular Imaging - Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics". www.well.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 2017-12-01.
  9. ^ "Research areas - Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics". www.well.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 2017-12-01.