Werner Hildenbrand

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Werner Hildenbrand
Hildenbrand 1973 MFO1735.jpg
1973 in Erlangen
Born (1936-05-25) 25 May 1936 (age 81)
Göttingen, Germany
Nationality German
Citizenship German
Alma mater University of Heidelberg
Known for Contributions to the general equilibrium theory
Scientific career
Fields Mathematician
Economist
Institutions University of Bonn
Thesis Über straffe Funktionale (1964)
Doctoral advisor Klaus Krickeberg (de), Gottfried Köthe
Doctoral students Thorsten Hens, Walter Trockel (de)
Notes
Contributed to the Facts and Ideas in Microeconomic Theory

Werner Hildenbrand (born 25 May 1936 in Göttingen, Germany) is a German economist and mathematician. He was educated at the University of Heidelberg, where he received his Diplom in mathematics, applied mathematics and physics in 1961. He continued his education at the University of Heidelberg and received his Ph.D. in mathematics in 1964 and his habilitation in economics and mathematics in 1968.

From 1969 to 2001 he was a professor of economics at the University of Bonn. He has held various visiting positions at, among others, the University of California, Berkeley and the University of Louvain. His research has focused on general equilibrium theory, and in particular on the existence and properties of the core of an economy.

Books[edit]

  • Core and Equilibria of a Large Economy, Princeton University Press, 1974.[1]
  • Introduction to Equilibrium Analysis, with Alan Kirman, North-Holland, 1976.
  • Equilibrium Analysis, with Alan Kirman, North-Holland, 1988.[2]
  • Market Demand: Theory and Empirical Evidence, Princeton University Press, 1994.[3]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Werner Hildenbrand (8 March 2015). Core and Equilibria of a Large Economy. (PSME-5). Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-1-4008-6947-3. 
  2. ^ Werner Hildenbrand; A. P. Kirman (1988). Equilibrium analysis: variations on themes by Edgeworth and Walras. North-Holland. ISBN 978-0-444-70511-2. 
  3. ^ Werner Hildenbrand (14 July 2014). Market Demand: Theory and Empirical Evidence. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-1-4008-6371-6.