West Bromwich Albion F.C. Women

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West Bromwich Albion Women
Full nameWest Bromwich Albion Football Club Women
Short nameWBA
Founded1989 (as West Bromwich Albion Womens F.C.)
GroundRedditch United FC, Redditch
ManagerSiobhan Hodgetts-Still
LeagueFA Women's National League North
2022–23FA Women's National League North, 8th of 12
WebsiteClub website
Change colours

West Bromwich Albion Football Club Women is an English women's football club affiliated with West Bromwich Albion F.C. The first team currently plays in the FA Women's National League North. In 2010–11, the then named Sporting Club Albion won the Midland Combination Women's Football League promoting them to the FA Women's Premier League.[1]

The club is also closely affiliated with West Bromwich Albion Girls Regional Talent Centre, with the objective of bringing through Youth Players into the first team, as well as the Disability Sports Club and Basketball clubs.

The club appointed Siobian Hodgetts-Still in July 2023.

History[edit]

Early years (1989–2008)[edit]

The club was founded as West Bromwich Albion Women's F.C. in 1989 playing local and recreational football.[2] In 1995 they joined the Midland Combination Women's Football League, but was not part of West Bromwich Albion F.C.[2] In the 2004–05 season they were incorporated in the WBA Community Programme and committed to developing youth players. They continued in this way for four more seasons.[2]

The Albion Foundation (2009–2011)[edit]

In 2009 the club was part of The Albion Foundation and was incorporated into Sporting Club Albion, alongside the Basketball and Disabled Sports teams. Their second season in this format saw them win the Midlands Combination Women's Football League title and gain promotion the FA Women's Premier League in the process. In the summer of 2011 the announcement of the Girls Centre of Excellence brought new promise of improvement in the development of young players.[2]

Recent years (2012–present)[edit]

Over the next seasons they have stabilised themselves in the Premier League Northern Division and are looking to become one of the strongest teams over the next few years.[2]

In the 2015/16 season under the leadership of manager Graham Abercrombie, the club achieved a league and cup double winning both the FA Women's Premier League Northern Division and the Birmingham Ladies County Cup. They narrowly missed out on promotion to the FA Women's Super League Division 2, losing 4–2 in a playoff with FA Women's Premier League Southern Division champions Brighton & Hove Albion W.F.C. They also made it to the quarter finals of the FA Women's Cup, losing 2–0 to Super League side Manchester City W.F.C.

For the 2016–17 season, the club reverted to the West Bromwich Albion name where they had another successful campaign winning the Birmingham Ladies County Cup for a second year running under new manager Craig Nicholls.

In the 2017–2018 season, the club appointed Louis Sowe as new manager, but despite reaching the Birmingham Ladies County Cup Semi-Final, they suffered relegation to the newly named FA Women's National League Midlands Division One.[3]

In the 2021-2022 season, the club appointed Jenny Sugarman as the new head coach.The former Aston Villa Women Assistant Manager arrives at The Hawthorns with 20 years of experience across both men’s and women’s football. She has previously managed Loughborough Foxes, now known as Loughborough Lightening, in the FA Women’s National League Northern Premier Division – the level the Baggies currently play. On the appointment, Director of Football for Albion Women Dave Lawrence said: “We’re delighted to have Jenny on board. “She is somebody who is really forward thinking and has got tremendous experience in the women’s game. “Jenny's got a great track record of developing players, many of whom speak very highly of her. “I’m really looking forward to working with her and I hope she can play a part in our ambition to move up from the third tier into the Championship in the seasons to come.” Jenny guided West Brom to the Birmingham County Cup final where they played Wolverhampton wonderes at Walsall FC and finished 8th in the league


Colours and badge[edit]

Their kits are identical to those of West Bromwich Albion F.C.

Stadium[edit]

West Bromwich Albion Women play the majority of home games at the Valley Stadium, home of Redditch United.

They occasionally play home matches at The Hawthorns.

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

As of 29 October 2023.

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
1 GK England ENG Lucy Jones
26 GK United States USA Anna Miller
2 DF England ENG Ashlee Brown
3 DF England ENG Hannah George (Captain)
4 MF England ENG Francesca Orthodoxou
5 DF England ENG Lucy Newell
6 DF England ENG Isabel Green
8 MF England ENG Abi Loydon
10 MF England ENG Olivia Rabjohn
No. Pos. Nation Player
9 FW England ENG Mariam Mahmood
11 MF England ENG Lizzie Bennett-Steele
14 FW England ENG Steph Weston
15 DF England ENG Hayley Crackle
20 MF England ENG Phoebe Warner
21 FW England ENG Jannelle Straker
22 MF England ENG Kate Evans
23 DF Wales WAL Taylor Reynolds
27 FW England ENG Simran Jhamat

Coaching staff[edit]

Name Role
Siobhan Hodgetts-Still Head coach
Liam Wall Assistant Head coach
Abbie Hinton Assistant Head coach
Rob Elliot Goalkeeping Coach
Callum Blades Sports Scientist (S&C)

Honours[edit]

Midland Combination Women's Football League

  • Champions: 2010-11[1]

FA Women's Premier League Northern Division

  • Champions 2015-16 (As Sporting Club Albion Ladies)

Birmingham Women's County Cup

  • Runners up 2021-22
  • Winners 2016-17
  • Winners 2015-16 (As Sporting Club Albion Ladies)
  • Runners up 2014-15

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Midland Womens Combination League". full-time.thefa.com. Retrieved 7 November 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Ladies". thealbionfoundation.co.uk. Retrieved 7 November 2015.
  3. ^ "Albion confirm re-signings". Official website of West Bromwich Albion FC Women. 16 July 2018. Retrieved 9 January 2020.

External links[edit]