Scouting in Massachusetts

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Scouting in Massachusetts
Boy Scouts World Wars memorial
Boy Scouts World Wars memorial
Scouts at Fenway Park
Scouts at Fenway Park
Betty Ford with Girl Scouts
Betty Ford with Girl Scouts
Cambridge plaque
Cambridge plaque
 Scouting portal

Scouting in Massachusetts includes both Girl Scout and Boy Scout organizations. Both were founded in the 1910s in Massachusetts. With a vigorous history, both organizations actively serve thousands of youth in programs that suit the environment in which they live.

History[edit]

By 1910, a scout like group, Boston City Guard, was founded by Frank O. Carpenter of the English High School. In June 1910, the American Boy Scouts started organizing the Department of New England which was operational in August or September under chief department scout General William H. Oakes and based in Boston.[1]

Boy Scouting in Massachusetts today[edit]

Cape Cod and the Islands Council[edit]

Cape Cod and the Islands Council
Owner Boy Scouts of America
Headquarters Yarmouthport, Massachusetts
Country United States
Website
www.scoutscapecod.org

The Cape Cod and the Islands Council serves Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, and Nantucket with the headquarters in Yarmouthport, Massachusetts. The Council owns two camps: Greenough Scout Reservation as well as Camp Richard. The Order of the Arrow lodge is Abake Mi-Sa-Na-Ki Lodge #393.

Knox Trail Council[edit]

Knox Trail Council
Knox Trail Council CSP.png
Owner Boy Scouts of America
Headquarters Marlborough, Massachusetts
Country United States
Founded 1996
Website
ktc-bsa.org

Knox Trail Council is the result of the consolidation of the Norumbega and Algonquin Councils in 1996. It serves the greater MetroWest area of Eastern Massachusetts. It has two camping properties: The E. Paul Robsham Scout Reservation — in Bolton (Camp Resolute), and the Nobscot Scout Reservation — in Framingham/Sudbury. The Order of the Arrow Lodge is Chippanyonk Lodge.

Mohegan Council[edit]

Mohegan Council
Owner Boy Scouts of America
Headquarters Worcester, Massachusetts
Country United States
Website
www.mohegancouncilbsa.org

Mohegan Council serves Central Massachusetts in southern portion of Worcester County, Massachusetts. The Council operates Treasure Valley as its summer camp. The Order of the Arrow Lodge is Pachachaug Lodge.

Narragansett Council[edit]

Narragansett Council
Owner Boy Scouts of America
Headquarters East Providence, Rhode Island
Country United States
Website
www.narragansettbsa.org
Main article: Narragansett Council

Narragansett Council is based in East Providence, Rhode Island and serves part of Massachusetts as well as all of Rhode Island and part of Connecticut. The Council camps are Yawgoog Scout Reservation and Camp Cachalot. The Order of the Arrow Lodge is Tulpe Lodge #102.

Nashua Valley Council[edit]

Nashua Valley Council
Owner Boy Scouts of America
Headquarters Lancaster, Massachusetts
Country United States
Founded 1965
Website
www.nashuavalleybsa.org
Main article: Nashua Valley Council

Nashua Valley Council serves north-central Massachusetts and was formed in 1965 from the merger of the Wachusett Council and the Fitchburg Area Council. The Council owns Camp Wanocksett and Camp Split Rock. The Order of the Arrow Lodge is Grand Monadnock Lodge.

Old Colony Council[edit]

Old Colony Council
Old Colony Council CSP.png
Owner Boy Scouts of America
Headquarters Canton, Massachusetts
Country United States
President Robert Hillman Esq.
Council Commissioner Peter Glass
Scout Executive Rick Stritzinger
Website
oldcolonycouncil.org
 Scouting portal
Main article: Old Colony Council

Old Colony Council [1] based at Canton, Massachusetts serves southeastern Massachusetts.

Western Massachusetts Council[edit]

The Western Massachusetts Council was created on June 28, 2008 with the merger of Great Trails Council and Pioneer Valley Council. Geographically, it is the largest Boy Scout council in Massachusetts serving Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden, and Hampshire counties and the town of Stamford, Vermont. The council operates Scout office-service centers in Westfield and Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and year-round camping facilities at Horace A. Moses Scout Reservation in Russell and Chesterfield Scout Reservation in Chesterfield, Massachusetts.

The Western Massachusetts Council is divided into three districts:

  • Appalachian Trail District
  • Metacomet District
  • General Knox District

Order of the Arrow – The Pocumtuc Lodge of the Western Massachusetts Council was formed by the merger of Memsochet Lodge 507 (Great Trails Council) and Allogagan Lodge 83 (Pioneer Valley Council)[2] on September 28, 2008.

Spirit of Adventure Council[edit]

Spirit of Adventure Council
Owner Boy Scouts of America
Headquarters Milton, MA
Country United States
Founded 2015
President N/A
Scout Executive Chuck Eaton
Website
[2]
 Scouting portal

The Spirit of Adventure Council was formed from a merger of the Yankee Clipper Council and Boston Minuteman Council on July 1, 2015. As part of this merger, New Hampshire towns of the former Yankee Clipper Council were transferred to Daniel Webster Council headquartered in Manchester, NH.

George W. Magee Memorial Trust Fund[edit]

The George W. Magee Memorial Trust Fund is a Massachusetts-based trust whose proceeds are used to support the purchase and improvement of the camps operated by Boy Scout Councils in Massachusetts.

History[edit]

George W. P. Magee was a theatrical agent and manager who most notably managed Boston's Grand Opera House from the 1890s through 1916. Being very involved in the community, he saw Scouting as a program making significant positive impact on the lives of young men. He turned this belief into a permanent commitment to Scouting, by establishing a trust upon his death. His will reads, in part:

"They shall pay the amounts, during their respective lives, to the individuals mentioned above, and they shall distribute the balance of the net income of the said Trust Fund to such of the councils of the BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA as are located in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and as, in the opinion of said Trustees, are performing the most efficient service, the said net income to be used, so far as possible, for the purchase and maintenance of summer camps or training camps in New England for the use of Boy Scouts. These payments shall be made by said Trustees after consultation with the officials of the Boy Scouts of America.

It is my desire that the said Councils to whom this Fund is distributed, shall, during the week of August sixth, which date is my birthday have such competitive games, drills and/or exhibitions as may, in the opinion of said Councils, be for the greatest benefit of the said boys and will also tend to permanently impress upon them the nature of the Fund, and, for such purpose, they may award such cups, badges or other recognition of merit as to them may seem proper.

In disbursing the said income, the Trustees have the right to erect in any Boy Scout camp or training field conducted under the auspices of Councils of the Boy Scouts located in Massachusetts, a lodge or general meeting place with a proper inscription showing that the said structure is erected and dedicated by this Fund."

George Magee died in 1939, with France Cornell and Frederick W. Cook becoming the original Trustees of the fund. It took nearly 5 years, until 1944, for the fund to reach the minimum level for income to be distributed ($500,000). In 1944, the fund distributed $11,000. Upon the death of Mr. Cornell in 1961, the Old Colony Trust Company became the sole corporate trustee of the fund.

Today[edit]

As of 2004, the fund had a market value of approximately $7.3 million, with an annual distribution of $210,000. Over its lifetime, the fund has contributed over $6.2 million to hundreds of projects, impacting over a million youth, at various Boy Scout camps. Funds are held by the Private Bank at Bank of America, the current successor of the Old Colony Trust Company, and they are advised by a committee composed of local Scouting professionals and volunteers. Many Massachusetts camps conduct a "Magee Night" competition or other similar event to celebrate Mr. Magee's contribution, and it is quite easy to find buildings named after Mr. Magee or with plaques bearing his name.

Councils requesting money typically make proposals to the advisory committee, stating the purpose of the project, the amount being requested, and any moneys being provided through other sources. Only Councils located in Massachusetts are eligible, although as the will reads the camps that benefit may be located elsewhere in New England.

Girl Scout Councils in Massachusetts[edit]

Map of Girl Scout councils in Massachusetts

There are three Girl Scout councils serving Massachusetts, one of which is headquartered in Rhode Island.

Girl Scouts of Central and Western Massachusetts[edit]

Girl Scouts of Central and Western Massachusetts serves 15,000 girls in 186 communities. It was formed by a merger in early 2008 of three councils: Girl Scouts of Montachusett Council, Girl Scouts of Pioneer Valley, Girl Scouts of Western Massachusetts.

Headquarters: East Longmeadow, Massachusetts
website: http://www.gscwm.org/

Camps

Girl Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts[edit]

The historic Ephraim Hammond House in Waltham. The estate is now owned by the Girl Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts.

Girl Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts serves more than 45,000 girls and 17,000 adults in 177 Massachusetts communities and South Hampton, New Hampshire. It was formed February 1, 2008 by a merger of three councils: Girls Scouts, Patriots' Trail; Girl Scout Council of Southeastern Massachusetts; Girl Scouts of Spar and Spindle Council.

Headquarters: Boston, Massachusetts
website: http://www.gsema.org/

Service Centers[edit]

Camps[edit]

Girl Scouts of Rhode Island[edit]

This council supports Massachusetts girls in Bellingham, Blackstone, Attleboro, Fall River, North Attleboro, Plainville, Somerset, Swansea, Westport, Wrentham, Millville, Rehoboth and Seekonk.

Former Girl Scout Camps[edit]

Camp Muriel Flagg is a locale in Williamstown, Massachusetts named for Muriel Flagg, a Girl Scout leader and teacher. Originally a Girl Scout camp, it opened in June 1964 and probably ceased operations in the late 1970s or early 1980s. It is located at an elevation of 1,004 feet (306.0 m) and is 1.5 miles (2.4 km) north of Williamstown in Berkshire County Latitude 42°44′28″N 073°11′08″W / 42.74111°N 73.18556°W / 42.74111; -73.18556

Scouting museums[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Page 413-416. The Boy Scout Movement. New Boston: A Chronicle of Progress in Developing a Greater and Finer City, Volume 1. Boston 1915, Incorporated, 1910. Accessed on January 17, 2014.
  2. ^ http://www.pocumtuc.org/flaps.htm

External links[edit]