What's So Good About Goodbye

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"What's So Good About Goodbye"
Single by The Miracles
from the album I'll Try Something New
B-side"I've Been Good To You"
ReleasedDecember 14, 1961
Format7" single
RecordedRCA Victor Studios, Chicago, Illinois October 14, 1961
GenreSoul/pop
Length2:23
LabelTamla
T 54053
Songwriter(s)Smokey Robinson
Producer(s)Berry Gordy, Jr.
The Miracles singles chronology
"Everybody's Gotta Pay Some Dues"
(1961)
"What's So Good About Goodbye"
(1961)
"I'll Try Something New"
(1962)

"What's So Good About Goodbye" was a 1961 hit single recorded by R&B group The Miracles for Motown Records' Tamla label, later included on their 1962 album I'll Try Something New. The single was the Miracles’ second Top 40 Pop hit, peaking at number 35 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States during the winter of 1962, and a Top 20 R&B hit as well, peaking at number 16 on Billboard's R&B singles chart.

Written by Miracles lead singer Smokey Robinson, "What's So Good About Goodbye" explores a relationship on the verge of breakup. This song, particularly Miracles member Marv Tarplin's guitar licks,[1] proved a major influence on The Beatles, and inspired their song "Ask Me Why". Its B-side, "I've Been Good To You", was also a hit, charting at number 103 in the U.S. It too was an influence on The Beatles, most notably shown on their 1968 recording “Sexy Sadie”. Both songs were performed on the group's first live album, The Miracles Recorded Live on Stage. "What's So Good About Goodbye" was later covered by The Temptations (and included on their 1965 album The Temptations Sing Smokey), rock band Quix*o*tic,[2] and Canadian group Giant Sunflower.[3]

Personnel[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "144. The Miracles: "What's So Good About Good Bye"". Motown Junkies. Retrieved 2016-09-26.
  2. ^ "Quix*O*Tic - Whats So Good About Goodbye". YouTube. 2010-10-07. Retrieved 2016-09-26.
  3. ^ "The Giant Sunflower - What's So Good About Goodbye [1967". YouTube. 2014-10-20. Retrieved 2016-09-26.

External links[edit]