What Technology Wants

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What Technology Wants
What Technology Wants, Book Cover Art.jpg
Author Kevin Kelly
Language English
Subject Culture, Human, Life, Technology
Genre Non-fiction
Publisher Viking Press
Publication date
2010
Media type Print (Hardback)
Pages 416
ISBN 978-0-670-02215-1

What Technology Wants is a 2010 nonfiction book by Kevin Kelly focused on technology as an extension of life.

Summary[edit]

The opening chapter of What Technology Wants, entitled "My Question," chronicles an early period in the author's life and conveys a sense of how he went from being a nomadic traveler with few possessions to a co-founder of Wired.[1][2]

What Technology Wants focuses on human-technology relations and argues for technology as the emerging seventh kingdom of life on earth.[3] The book invokes a giant force – the technium – which is "the greater, global, massively interconnected system of technology vibrating around us".[4]

Kevin Kelly gave a SALT talk (Seminars About Long-term Thinking) for the Long Now Foundation in November 2014 titled "Technium Unbound",[5] where he explained and expanded upon the ideas from his books What Technology Wants and Out of Control.

Criticism[edit]

Kelly's book has been criticized for espousing a teleological view of biological evolution that is rejected by some scientists, and for promoting a "bizarre neo-mystical progressivism."[4]

Editions[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kelly, K. (2010). What Technology Wants pp. 1-17. New York: Penguin Group.
  2. ^ Jennifer Pollock. Wired Co-Founder Kevin Kelly on 'What Technology Wants' , 7x7.com, October 24, 2010. Retrieved February 21, 2011.
  3. ^ The seventh kingdom of life, Edge Foundation, Inc., July 19, 2007. Retrieved February 21, 2011.
  4. ^ a b Jerry A. Coyne. Better All the Time, The New York Times Book Review, November 5, 2010. Retrieved February 21, 2011.
  5. ^ Technium Unbound

External links[edit]