What the Tudors Did for Us

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What the Tudors Did for Us
WhatTheTudorsDidForUs.jpg
Genre Documentary
Presented by Adam Hart-Davis
Composer(s) David Mitcham
Country of origin United Kingdom
Original language(s) English
No. of series 1
No. of episodes 4
Production
Producer(s)
Running time 23 minutes
Distributor BBC
Release
Original network BBC Two
Picture format 16:9 576i
Audio format Stereo
Original release 23 September (2002-09-23) – 14 October 2002 (2002-10-14)
Chronology
Preceded by What the Victorians Did for Us
Followed by What the Stuarts Did for Us
External links
Website www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/tudors/

What the Tudors Did for Us is a 2002 BBC documentary series that examines the impact of the Tudor period on modern society.

Episodes[edit]

Episode one: Seeing the World[edit]

Before Tudor times the image people had of their world was, well, rather dark and mysterious, but that was about to change thanks to some incredible adventures and remarkable discoveries.

— Adam Hart-Davis

Hart-Davis travels around Britain to introduce the idea and inventions of the Tudor Age in art, optics and exploration.

Episode two: The Thinkynge Revolution[edit]

One night in 1572 the Elizabethan astronomer Thomas Diggs saw a bright new star in the sky. It was a real shock; it shouldn't have been there. The Tudors believed that heaven, where God lived, was perfect and unchanging, and the appearance of this bright new star completely undermined their whole system of belief. But there was worse, that observation wasn't just quietly recorded it rapidly became common knowledge thanks to a really dangerous piece of high technology, the printing press. News of that star was just one of a load of ideas that were going to turn the Tudor world upside-down.

— Adam Hart-Davis

Hart-Davis travels around Britain to introduce the idea and inventions of the Tudor Age in science, literature and education.

Episode three: The Goode Lyfe[edit]

In a climate of domestic peace England prospered; wealthy Tudor homeowners could worry less about defence and more about comfort.

— Adam Hart-Davis

Hart-Davis travels around Britain showing how domestic life developed during Tudor times.

  • Interior design, using the example of Hardwick Hall: the layout of separate rooms with dedicated functions - instead of one great hall, upholstered furniture, wallpaper, carpets, and windows.
  • The invention of the flush toilet by John Harington.
  • Interior design, using the example of Hardwick Hall: the layout of separate rooms with dedicated functions - instead of one great hall, upholstered furniture, wallpaper, carpets, and windows.
  • The foundation of the Royal Exchange, London by Sir Thomas Gresham, and in particular the associated two floors of shops, characterised as the world's first mall.
  • The popularising of sports including real tennis and horse racing.
  • Adding hops to small beer thereby increasing the alcohol content.
  • The invention of the knitting machine by William Lee.

Episode four: War Machyne[edit]

External links[edit]