Where Have All Our Heroes Gone

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Where Have All Our Heroes Gone
Bill Anderson--Where Have All Our Heroes Gone.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedDecember 1970 (1970-12)
RecordedAugust 1970
StudioBradley's Barn
Genre
LabelDecca
ProducerOwen Bradley
Bill Anderson chronology
Love Is a Sometimes Thing
(1970)
Where Have All Our Heroes Gone
(1970)
Always Remember
(1971)
Singles from Where Have All Our Heroes Gone
  1. "Where Have All Our Heroes Gone"
    Released: September 1970

Where Have All Our Heroes Gone is a studio album by American country singer-songwriter Bill Anderson. It was released in December 1970 on Decca Records and was produced by Owen Bradley. It was Anderson's fifteenth studio album as a recording artist and his third studio album released in 1970. The album's title track became a major hit on the Billboard country chart. The album itself would also reach peak positions on the Billboard country albums chart.

Background and content[edit]

Where Have All Our Heroes Gone was recorded in August 1970 at Bradley's Barn, a studio located in Mount Juliet, Tennessee. The recording sessions were produced by Owen Bradley. It was Anderson's fifteenth studio album and fifth to be produced by Bradley[2] The album consisted of 11 tracks.[3] The project was designed to be a collection of recitation songs. Anderson presented the title track as which impressed Bradley and other engineers on the project. From the title track, an album was built around it. Three additional songs on the album were composed by Anderson. Other songs were cover versions of songs recorded by others. Among these tracks was Ray Price's "For the Good Times" and Kris Kristofferson's "Me and Bobby McGee".[2]

Release and reception[edit]

Where Have All the Heroes Gone was released in December 1970 and was his third studio album released that year.[2] It was issued as a vinyl LP, with five songs on side one and six songs on side two of the record.[3] The album spent a total of 11 weeks on the Billboard Top Country Albums chart before peaking at number 27 in April 1971.[4] The title track was the only single released from the album. Issued in September 1970, the song reached number six on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart by December.[5] It also reached a peak of number 93 on the Billboard Hot 100, one of his few singles to chart on that list.[6] It also reached number 9 on the RPM Country Singles chart in Canada.[7] In later years the album would be reviewed by Allmusic, which gave it a rating of 3.5 out of 5 possible stars.[1]

Track listing[edit]

Side one[3]
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Where Have All Our Heroes Gone"
4:59
2."For the Good Times"Kris Kristofferson3:23
3."Loving a Memory"Anderson2:45
4."Me and Bobby McGee"
2:35
5."And Then Came the Bad Years"Steve Karliski2:35
Side two[3]
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."All I Have to Offer You Is Me"
2:49
2."Poison Red Berries"Mickey Newbury3:38
3."I Can't Go Anywhere But Wrong"Anderson2:10
4."I'll Bring More Flowers"
  • Anderson
  • Bobby Runnell
2:18
5."Melinda"
2:43
6."Friends"
3:02

Personnel[edit]

All credits are adapted from the liner notes of Where Have All Our Heroes Gone.[2]

Musical personnel

Technical personnel

  • Owen Bradley – record producer

Chart performance[edit]

Chart (1970–1971) Peak
position
US Top Country Albums (Billboard)[8] 27

Release history[edit]

Region Date Format Label Ref.
United States June 1970 Vinyl Decca [2]
United Kingdom MCA [9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Where Have All Our Heroes Gone – Bill Anderson – Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d e Anderson, Bill (December 1970). "Where Have All Our Heroes Gone (Liner Notes & Album Information)". Decca Records.
  3. ^ a b c d "Bill Anderson – Where Have All Our Heroes Gone (1970, Vinyl)". discogs. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  4. ^ "Where Have All Our Heroes Gone chart history". Billboard. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  5. ^ ""Where Have All Our Heroes Gone" [single] chart history". Billboard. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  6. ^ ""Where Have All the Heroes Gone" Hot 100 chart history". Billboard. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  7. ^ "Search results for 'Bill Anderson' – Country Singles". RPM. Retrieved April 9, 2020.
  8. ^ "Bill Anderson Chart History (Top Country Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  9. ^ "Bill Anderson – Where Have All Our Heroes Gone (UK release)". discogs. Retrieved April 19, 2020.