Whitaker–McClendon House

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Whitaker–McClendon House
WhitakerMcClendonHouse1.JPG
Whitaker–McClendon House is located in Texas
Whitaker–McClendon House
Whitaker–McClendon House
Location within Texas
Location 806 W. Houston Street
Tyler, Texas
Coordinates 32°20′37″N 95°18′32″W / 32.343555°N 95.308915°W / 32.343555; -95.308915Coordinates: 32°20′37″N 95°18′32″W / 32.343555°N 95.308915°W / 32.343555; -95.308915
Type History
Website

McClendon House Official Site

Whitaker–McClendon House
NRHP Reference # 82004522[1]
RTHL # 7767
Significant dates
Added to NRHP June 2, 1982
Designated RTHL 1988

The Whitaker–McClendon House is a living history museum located at 806 W. Houston Street, in the city of Tyler, county of Smith in the U.S. state of Texas. The house is also known as the McClendon House, and the Bonner–Whitaker–McClendon House. White House correspondent Sarah McClendon was born and raised in this house. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places listings in Smith County, is a Recorded Texas Historic Landmark and a Tyler Historical Landmark.

History[edit]

This Victorian house, with touches of Italianate and Eastlake architecture, was built 1878–1880 by Harrison Moores Whitaker, a local attorney. The two-story cypress and pine house was constructed on a brick foundation. The first floor consists of the main foyer and living room, one bedroom and bath, plus the kitchen and dining room. Four more bedrooms and two baths are on the second floor. In 1910, ionic columns were added to support the portico. Also added in 1910 was a second-story bedroom with its own separate bathroom, and fronted by a porch. The two-acre parcel of land it sits on once belonged to James Pinckney Henderson, the first governor of Texas. When Whitaker married Mattie, the daughter of Texas Supreme Court justice Micajah H. Bonner, the justice purchased the land as a wedding gift for the newlyweds. Mattie died in 1892.[2] When Mattie's husband remarried in 1903, he relocated to Jefferson County and died there in 1922.[3] Whitaker rented out the house after his relocation to Jefferson County.[4] The house was purchased in 1907 by Anne and Sidney Smith McClendon, the sister and brother-in-law of Mattie Whitaker.[5] White House correspondent Sarah McClendon was born in this house in 1910, the youngest of nine children born to Sidney and Annie McClendon.[6][7] It was added to the National Register of Historic Places listings in Smith County in 1982, and has been a Recorded Texas Historic Landmark since 1988. The City of Tyler has also listed it as a Tyler Historical Landmark.[4][5]

Museum[edit]

Featured exhibits include artifacts and documents from the Antebellum period of Texas history through both World Wars.[8]

Hours, admission[edit]

Drop-in visitors are welcome Friday and Saturday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.. Discounts are given for group tours over 10 people, but need to be booked in advance. Additional hours for tours are added during select periods of the year. Actors in historical costumes provide narration.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Park Service (2007-01-23). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ Mattie Whitaker at Find a Grave
  3. ^ Harrison Moores Whitaker Sr. at Find a Grave
  4. ^ a b "THC NRHP". Texas Historical Commission. Retrieved 2 January 2012. 
  5. ^ a b "THC RTHL". Texas Historical Commission. Retrieved 2 January 2012. 
  6. ^ Reed Jr., Robert E (2008). Tyler. Arcadia Publishing. p. 20. ISBN 978-0-7385-4841-8. 
  7. ^ McDonald, Archie P (2007). Historic Smith County. Historical Publishing Network. p. 43. ISBN 978-1-893619-66-1. 
  8. ^ "McClendon Exhibits". McClendon House. Retrieved 2 January 2012. 
  9. ^ "House tours". McClendon House. Retrieved 2 January 2012. 

External links[edit]