White Bird, Idaho

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White Bird, Idaho
Town
Old Highway 95 in White Bird, July 2016
Old Highway 95 in White Bird, July 2016
Motto(s): 
"The Best of Two Rivers"[1]
Location of White Bird in Idaho County, Idaho.
Location of White Bird in Idaho County, Idaho.
Coordinates: 45°45′40″N 116°18′6″W / 45.76111°N 116.30167°W / 45.76111; -116.30167Coordinates: 45°45′40″N 116°18′6″W / 45.76111°N 116.30167°W / 45.76111; -116.30167
CountryUnited States
StateIdaho
CountyIdaho
Area
 • Total0.07 sq mi (0.17 km2)
 • Land0.07 sq mi (0.17 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
1,581 ft (482 m)
Population
 • Total91
 • Estimate 
(2019)[4]
95
 • Density1,461.54/sq mi (566.62/km2)
Time zoneUTC-8 (Pacific (PST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-7 (PDT)
ZIP code
83554
Area code(s)208
FIPS code16-87310
GNIS feature ID0398345
Websitewww.visitwhitebird.com

White Bird is a city in Idaho County, Idaho, United States. The population was 91 at the 2010 census, down from 106 in 2000.

History

At the southwest corner of the Camas Prairie, White Bird is near the Salmon River crossing point for the Lewis and Clark expedition. It is also the location of the Battle of White Bird Canyon 1877, which was the first fight of the Nez Perce War and a significant defeat of the U.S. Army. Chief White Bird was a leader of the tribe. The summit of White Bird Hill is 2,700 feet (820 m) above the city, ascended via U.S. Highway 95.[5]

The steeper, straighter, and faster multi-lane grade of U.S. 95 was opened 46 years ago in 1975, after ten challenging years of construction.[6] The two-lane road of 1921 to the east was first paved in 1938; it left the Salmon River at White Bird Creek, followed it up through White Bird, and then gradually climbed the grade in twice the distance, with multiple switchback curves to a higher summit, without a cut.[7]

White Bird was established 130 years ago in 1891,[1] and was named for the Nez Perce chief.[8]

Geography

White Bird is located at 45°45′40″N 116°18′6″W / 45.76111°N 116.30167°W / 45.76111; -116.30167 (45.761023, -116.301768).[9]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.07 square miles (0.18 km2), all of it land.[10]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1960253
1970185−26.9%
1980154−16.8%
1990108−29.9%
2000106−1.9%
201091−14.2%
2019 (est.)95[4]4.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]

2010 census

At the 2010 census there were 91 people in 53 households, including 27 families, in the city. The population density was 1,300.0 inhabitants per square mile (501.9/km2). There were 64 housing units at an average density of 914.3 per square mile (353.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 100.0% White. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.1%.[3]

Of the 53 households 7.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.3% were married couples living together, 3.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 1.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 49.1% were non-families. 41.5% of households were one person and 13.2% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 1.72 and the average family size was 2.26.

The median age was 60.5 years. 5.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 3.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 5.5% were from 25 to 44; 52.8% were from 45 to 64; and 33% were 65 or older. The gender makeup of the city was 51.6% male and 48.4% female.

2000 census

At the 2000 census there were 106 people in 59 households, including 31 families, in the city. The population density was 1,623.7 people per square mile (584.7/km2). There were 73 housing units at an average density of 1,118.2 per square mile (402.6/km2). The racial makup of the city was 97.17% White, 0.94% Native American, and 1.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.89%.[12]

Of the 59 households 6.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.5% were married couples living together, 3.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 45.8% were non-families. 39.0% of households were one person and 11.9% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 1.80 and the average family size was 2.31.

The age distribution was 12.3% under the age of 18, 3.8% from 18 to 24, 11.3% from 25 to 44, 46.2% from 45 to 64, and 26.4% 65 or older. The median age was 53 years. For every 100 females, there were 116.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 116.3 males.

The median household income was $18,558 and the median family income was $21,042. Males had a median income of $21,667 versus $25,000 for females. The per capita income for the city was $10,819. There were 10.8% of families and 21.2% of the population living below the poverty line, including 40.0% of under eighteens and none of those over 64.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "White Bird Idaho". White Bird Idaho. Retrieved September 2, 2012.
  2. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  3. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18.
  4. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  5. ^ "Life goes on a tad slower in Whitebird". Spokane Chronicle. Associated Press. February 21, 1984. p. C10.
  6. ^ Roche, Kevin (June 17, 1975). "'Goat trail' symbol breaks as Whitebird route opens". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). p. 12A.
  7. ^ "New Idaho road will rival Lewiston hill". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). November 27, 1918. p. 8.
  8. ^ "Profile for White Bird, Idaho, ID". ePodunk. Retrieved September 2, 2012.
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18.
  11. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.

External links