White House Internship Program

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Official logo of the White House Internship Program

The White House Internship Program is a government internship program for students and graduates to work at the White House.


Program overview[edit]

President Barack Obama talking with White House interns in spring 2012

The White House Internship Program is unpaid.[1][2][3] Interns must be U.S. citizens and at least 18 years of age, and must be either a current student, recent graduate, or veteran of the United States Armed Forces.[4] Those selected for the program are able to work in one of sixteen available presidential departments.[5]

The White House Internship Program is split into three semester seasons: Summer, Fall, and Spring.[6]

In addition to the opportunity to work in the Executive Office of the President, the White House Internship Program also includes a speaker series, tours to sites around Washington, D.C., opportunities to volunteer in the community, and attendance at special events.[7]

Former White House interns[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fox, Emily (August 22, 2013). "White House under pressure to pay its interns". CNNMoney. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  2. ^ Lurie, Stephen (April 23, 2014). "Stephen Lurie: Why won't President Obama pay his interns?". Washington Post. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  3. ^ Fisher, Julia (September 24, 2013). "Revealed: The Insiders Whose Kids Got White House Internships". The New Republic. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  4. ^ "Selection Process". White House. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  5. ^ "Presidential Department Descriptions". White House. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  6. ^ "Internship Timeline and FAQs". White House. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  7. ^ "The White House Internship Program: Internship Program Description". National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  8. ^ "JFK intern Mimi Alford shares story of her affair with Kennedy in new book. Relevant? Historian Robert Dallek says yes". The Washington Post. February 7, 2012. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g "White House Internship Program announces fall 2016 participants" (Press release). Dec 15, 2016. 
  10. ^ http://www.linkedin.com/in/elisearonson
  11. ^ "Biography". U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  12. ^ "Neil Cavuto". Fox Business Network. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  13. ^ Misha talks about his experience interning at the White House. August 9, 2011. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  14. ^ "Biography". Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  15. ^ "White House Author". White House. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  16. ^ Martin, Jonathan (April 30, 2009). "Anita Dunn heads to the White House". Politico. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  17. ^ "Strategizing for the President, and Corporate Clients, Too". New York Times. October 19, 2012. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  18. ^ Thompson, Krissah (May 7, 2015). "Deesha Dyer: How a hip-hop lover from Philly became social secretary". Washington Post. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  19. ^ "Jim Ferrell". Seattle Times. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  20. ^ "Zack Friedman". Bloomberg News. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  21. ^ Wong, Kristina (November 17, 2015). "A Capital success, from the ground up". The Hill. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  22. ^ Havard, Kate (March 22, 2013). "Unspun: Del. Keiffer Mitchell, Jr". Washington Post. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  23. ^ "White House Interns Kept on Sidelines". Los Angeles Times. January 25, 1998. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  24. ^ "Rep. Parker Biography". Texas House of Representatives. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  25. ^ "Mr. Prince Goes to Washington: Blackwater Founder Testifies Before Congress". Democracy Now!. October 3, 2007. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  26. ^ "Biography of Richard Norton Smith". White House. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 
  27. ^ "A Brief History of Interns". Time. July 30, 2009. Retrieved May 29, 2016. 

External links[edit]

Official website