White House press corps

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The White House press corps is the group of journalists, correspondents, and members of the media usually assigned to the White House in Washington, D.C., to cover the president of the United States, White House events, and news briefings. Its offices are located in the West Wing.

Overview[edit]

Photographers and videographers in the Oval Office in 2019
Semi-permanent setup of press corps on the west end of the north White House lawn, from where live media broadcasts with the White House are typically delivered

The White House press secretary, or a deputy, generally holds a weekday news briefing in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room, which currently seats 49 reporters. Each seat is assigned to a news gathering organization, with the most prominent organizations occupying the first two rows. Reporters who do not have an assigned seat may stand. Often a smaller group of reporters known as the "press pool" is assembled to report back to their colleagues on events where the venue would make open coverage logistically difficult.[1] There can be different pools assembled on any given day to include a pool covering the president, vice president, first lady, and other prominent members of the staff.

When a new U.S. president is elected, some news organizations change their correspondents, most often to the reporter who had been assigned to cover the new president during the preceding campaign. For example, after the 2008 presidential campaign, ABC News moved Jake Tapper, who had covered Barack Obama during his presidential campaign,[citation needed] to the White House correspondent's position.[2]

History[edit]

The White House press corps had their first duties in the White House in the early 1900s. An urban legend exists of President Theodore Roosevelt noticing a group of correspondents in the rain looking for sources for their stories and inviting them into the White House. Subsequent historical research outlines how reporters were able to start with small stories in the White House and then grew their presence and influence over a span of many years.[3]

The White House press "pool" gets its name from the briefing room which used to be a pool until President Richard Nixon converted the pool to a briefing room. The pool which was covered still remains under the briefing room.[4]

Notable correspondents[edit]

The following outlets have had reporters covering the White House full time and a permanent assigned seat in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room:[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tau, Byron (November 16, 2016). "Q&A: What Is the Press Pool and What Does It Do?". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  2. ^ a b "2018 Award Winners". White House Correspondents' Association. 2018. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  3. ^ Condon, George (2014). "History". White House Correspondents' Association. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  4. ^ "FDR's Swimming Pool Is Hidden Under the White House Press Briefing Room". Atlas Obscura. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  5. ^ "White House Press Room Seating Chart". White House Correspondents Insider. July 5, 2017.
  6. ^ Wemple, Erik (May 26, 2017). "Opinion: White House correspondent bolts Sputnik over the obvious". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on May 26, 2017. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  7. ^ "Annie Karni - The New York Times". www.nytimes.com. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  8. ^ Karni, Annie. "Annie Karni". Politico PRO. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  9. ^ "(Untitled)". Twitter. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  10. ^ "Ayesha Rascoe". NPR.org.
  11. ^ Justin, Neal (October 27, 2020). "Ex-WCCO reporter shares his often 'crazy' life as White House correspondent". Star Tribune. Archived from the original on October 30, 2020. Retrieved December 16, 2020.
  12. ^ "Bob Woodward | Biography, Books, Carl Bernstein, & Facts". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  13. ^ "Watergate Scandal". History. October 29, 2009. Archived from the original on January 23, 2021. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  14. ^ Hafner, Josh (October 1, 2018). "Trump insults female reporter: 'You're not thinking. You never do'". USA Today. Archived from the original on October 2, 2018. Retrieved May 18, 2021.
  15. ^ Sarnoff, Marisa (January 19, 2021). "ABC News, Washington Post Announce Incoming White House Teams". Mediaite. Archived from the original on January 19, 2021. Retrieved May 18, 2021.
  16. ^ Concha, Joe (March 19, 2020). "OAN reporter roasted for asking Trump if saying 'Chinese food' is racist: 'Dumbest question' ever". The Hill. Archived from the original on March 20, 2020. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  17. ^ "(Untitled)". Twitter. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  18. ^ "David Nakamura". Washington Post. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  19. ^ "(Untitled)". Twitter. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  20. ^ "Hallie Jackson". Washington Week. March 1, 2018. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  21. ^ "Helen Thomas". Encyclopaedia Britannica. July 31, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  22. ^ Mastrangelo, Dominick (August 5, 2021). "Fox News names Jacqui Heinrich as White House correspondent". The Hill. Archived from the original on August 5, 2021. Retrieved March 12, 2022.
  23. ^ "(Untitled)". Twitter. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  24. ^ "Jeremy Diamond". CNN. Retrieved November 21, 2020.[dead link]
  25. ^ Schwartz, Ian (June 17, 2020). "Acosta vs. McEnany: Will Trump Take Responsibility If People Get Virus At Rally? Many Have Preexisting Conditions". RealClearPolitics. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  26. ^ Mastrangelo, Dominick (January 11, 2021). "CNN's Acosta moving away from White House". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 11, 2021. Retrieved May 18, 2021.
  27. ^ Wilstein, Matt (December 21, 2018). "Fox News Calls Out Trump for 'Flipping a 180' on Shutdown Blame". Daily Beast. Archived from the original on June 5, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  28. ^ "Jonathan Karl". ABC News. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  29. ^ a b Froomkin, Dan (April 14, 2020). "Paula Reid and Kaitlan Collins pop the toddler king's balloon — and he melts down". Salon. Archived from the original on November 19, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  30. ^ Moore, Thomas (March 12, 2021). "CNBC changes up Washington, White House team". The Hill. Archived from the original on March 12, 2021. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  31. ^ Foster, Brooke Lea (March 10, 2017). "For NBC's Kristen Welker, Love Took Its Time". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 15, 2017. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  32. ^ Sassoon, Mara. "KRISTIN FISHER: ON THE TRUMP BEAT". Com Talk. Boston University College of Communication. Archived from the original on May 18, 2020. Retrieved July 2, 2020.
  33. ^ a b Flood, Brian. "Fox News names Peter Doocy White House correspondent". Fox News. Archived from the original on March 10, 2022. Retrieved March 12, 2022.
  34. ^ "Journalist Maggie Haberman Tells Her Own Story". Stony Brook University News. April 13, 2021. Archived from the original on May 23, 2021. Retrieved March 12, 2022.
  35. ^ "CBS News Team". CBS News. Archived from the original on January 1, 2021. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  36. ^ "Franco Ordoñez". NPR.org.
  37. ^ Buchanan, Larry; Yourish, Karen (February 11, 2017). "All Joking Aside, Here's How Sean Spicer is Shaking Up the White House Press Briefing". The New York Times. Retrieved August 26, 2020.
  38. ^ Williamson, Elizabeth (March 31, 2010). "Trivial Pursuit: One Man's Quest to Catalog Presidential Minutiae". The Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Archived from the original on March 10, 2015. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  39. ^ "(Untitled)". Twitter. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  40. ^ "CNN Names Michelle Kosinski White House Correspondent". Deadline Hollywood. February 7, 2014. Archived from the original on March 7, 2014. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  41. ^ "Olivier Knox joins The Washington Post to anchor The Daily 202". The Washington Post. January 5, 2021. ISSN 0190-8286. Archived from the original on May 19, 2021. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  42. ^ Katz, A.J. (October 10, 2017). "Geoff Bennett Joins NBC News as White House Correspondent". Adweek. Archived from the original on September 15, 2018. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  43. ^ "Peter Baker". Washington Week. June 30, 2014. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  44. ^ "(Untitled)". Twitter. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  45. ^ "(Untitled)". Twitter. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  46. ^ "(Untitled)". Twitter. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  47. ^ "Seung Min Kim". Washington Week. June 28, 2018. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  48. ^ "Tamara Keith". Institute of Governmental Studies - UC Berkeley. October 13, 2016. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  49. ^ Riechmann, Deb; Tang, Terry (March 18, 2020). "Trump dubs COVID-19 'Chinese virus' despite hate crime risks". Associated Press. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved August 26, 2020.
  50. ^ Mindock, Clark; Barnes, Tom (November 7, 2018). "Trump accuses black reporter of 'racist question' after she asks if his rhetoric has emboldened white nationalists". The Independent. Archived from the original on December 1, 2018. Retrieved August 26, 2020.
  51. ^ "National Politics Team - Media Center". Associated Press. Archived from the original on May 6, 2021. Retrieved September 4, 2020.

External links[edit]