White Sulphur Springs, Montana

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White Sulphur Springs
Highway 12 looking west toward the Big Belt Mountains
Highway 12 looking west toward the Big Belt Mountains
Nickname(s): 
Sulphurville
Location of White Sulphur Springs, Montana
Location of White Sulphur Springs, Montana
Coordinates: 46°32′47″N 110°54′9″W / 46.54639°N 110.90250°W / 46.54639; -110.90250Coordinates: 46°32′47″N 110°54′9″W / 46.54639°N 110.90250°W / 46.54639; -110.90250
CountryUnited States
StateMontana
CountyMeagher
Area
 • Total1.01 sq mi (2.62 km2)
 • Land1.01 sq mi (2.62 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation
5,043 ft (1,537 m)
Population
 • Total939
 • Estimate 
(2018)[3]
934
 • Density930/sq mi (360/km2)
Time zoneUTC-7 (Mountain (MST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-6 (MDT)
ZIP code
59645
Area code(s)406
FIPS code30-80050
GNIS feature ID0793216

White Sulphur Springs is a city in and the county seat of Meagher County, Montana, United States.[4] The population was 939 at the 2010 census.

The center of population of Montana is located in White Sulphur Springs.[5]

No one can put a finger on why the word Sulphur is spelled the way that it is. The traditional, scientific North American spelling is "sulfur" while the spelling "sulphur" is usually reserved for non-scientific and non-North American spellings.[6] With the town squarely in the middle of North American some wonder if it was a typo and that it should be White Sulfur Springs. There is a strong swell of support that is accepting both spellings on official documents.

Geography and climate[edit]

White Sulphur Springs is located at 46°32′47″N 110°54′9″W / 46.54639°N 110.90250°W / 46.54639; -110.90250 (46.546396, -110.902552).[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.01 square miles (2.62 km2), all land.[1]

Climate data for White Sulphur Springs, Montana (1981-2010; extremes since 1979)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 59
(15)
62
(17)
72
(22)
81
(27)
87
(31)
97
(36)
99
(37)
98
(37)
93
(34)
87
(31)
69
(21)
58
(14)
99
(37)
Average high °F (°C) 33.3
(0.7)
36.4
(2.4)
44.3
(6.8)
53.7
(12.1)
63.0
(17.2)
71.2
(21.8)
80.4
(26.9)
80.8
(27.1)
69.6
(20.9)
56.6
(13.7)
41.1
(5.1)
32.1
(0.1)
55.2
(12.9)
Average low °F (°C) 13.5
(−10.3)
14.5
(−9.7)
21.2
(−6.0)
27.6
(−2.4)
35.5
(1.9)
42.7
(5.9)
47.9
(8.8)
46.5
(8.1)
38.5
(3.6)
29.7
(−1.3)
20.8
(−6.2)
12.2
(−11.0)
29.2
(−1.6)
Record low °F (°C) −37
(−38)
−43
(−42)
−23
(−31)
−2
(−19)
14
(−10)
23
(−5)
33
(1)
23
(−5)
12
(−11)
−18
(−28)
−30
(−34)
−46
(−43)
−46
(−43)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 0.42
(11)
0.35
(8.9)
0.76
(19)
1.28
(33)
2.06
(52)
2.43
(62)
1.57
(40)
1.11
(28)
1.09
(28)
0.75
(19)
0.47
(12)
0.48
(12)
12.78
(325)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 5.4
(14)
6.2
(16)
6.9
(18)
3.9
(9.9)
0.9
(2.3)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.9
(2.3)
1.9
(4.8)
3.9
(9.9)
6.3
(16)
36.4
(92)
Source: NOAA[8]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910417
192062950.8%
1930553−12.1%
194081847.9%
195092913.6%
1960898−3.3%
19701,20033.6%
19801,3028.5%
1990963−26.0%
20009842.2%
2010939−4.6%
Est. 2018934[3]−0.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[9][10]

2010 census[edit]

At the 2010 census there were 939 people in 433 households, including 255 families, in the city. The population density was 929.7 inhabitants per square mile (359.0/km2). There were 563 housing units at an average density of 557.4 per square mile (215.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.2% White, 0.1% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 1.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.4%.[2]

Of the 433 households 22.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.4% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 1.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 41.1% were non-families. 37.4% of households were one person and 19.6% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.13 and the average family size was 2.75.

The median age was 51.2 years. 19% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 18% were from 25 to 44; 31.4% were from 45 to 64; and 26.3% were 65 or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.8% male and 50.2% female.

2000 census[edit]

At the 2000 census there were 984 people in 443 households, including 265 families, in the city. The population density was 1,069.1 people per square mile (413.0/km²). There were 567 housing units at an average density of 616.0 per square mile (238.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.24% White, 1.42% Native American, 0.20% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 0.51% from other races, and 1.52% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.93%.[11]

Of the 443 households 25.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.1% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.0% were non-families. 37.0% of households were one person and 17.8% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.16 and the average family size was 2.84.

The age distribution was 22.4% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 22.5% from 25 to 44, 26.9% from 45 to 64, and 21.3% 65 or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 94.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.9 males.

The median household income was $28,229 and the median family income was $34,342. Males had a median income of $23,403 versus $13,929 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,836. About 11.6% of families and 13.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.5% of those under age 18 and 11.0% of those age 65 or over.

Notable residents[edit]

A student rights advocate, radical thinker, and controversial critic of government policy who made pioneering contributions through his research, to the field of Political Science. He completed a BA at the University of Montana and continued his studies at the University of Oregon where he obtained a PhD. He taught at the University of Washington, Queens College in New York City, McMaster University in Burlington, Ontario and Memorial University of Newfoundland.

  • Richard T Ringling, Son of Ringling brothers founder, Alf T. Ringling.
  • Paul Ringling, legislator. Son of Richard and Aubrey Ringling. Grandson of Alf T. Ringling.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2011-02-20. Retrieved 2012-12-18.
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18.
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  5. ^ "Population and Population Centers by State: 2000". U. S. Census Bureau. 2000. Archived from the original on September 18, 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-07.
  6. ^ "word choice - What is the name of the chemical Sulfur or Sulphur?". English Language & Usage Stack Exchange. Retrieved 2020-05-08.
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  8. ^ "NOWData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved May 4, 2013.
  9. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  10. ^ "Census & Economic Information Center". Retrieved July 3, 2015.
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  12. ^ "Red Ants Pants a perfect fit for Montana". Great Falls Tribune. Retrieved 2018-03-20.

External links[edit]