Whitehall, Ohio

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Whitehall, Ohio
City
Whitehall City Hall, located at 360 S. Yearling Road, Whitehall, OH 43213
Whitehall City Hall, located at 360 S. Yearling Road, Whitehall, OH 43213

Seal
Nickname(s): Ram Country
Motto: City of Pride
Location of Whitehall, Ohio
Location of Whitehall, Ohio
Location of Whitehall in Franklin County
Location of Whitehall in Franklin County
Coordinates: 39°57′49″N 82°52′57″W / 39.96361°N 82.88250°W / 39.96361; -82.88250Coordinates: 39°57′49″N 82°52′57″W / 39.96361°N 82.88250°W / 39.96361; -82.88250
Country United States
State Ohio
County Franklin
Government
 • Mayor Kim Maggard
Area[1]
 • Total 5.29 sq mi (13.70 km2)
 • Land 5.26 sq mi (13.62 km2)
 • Water 0.03 sq mi (0.08 km2)
Elevation[2] 794 ft (242 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 18,062
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 18,403
 • Density 3,433.8/sq mi (1,325.8/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 43213
Area code(s) 614
FIPS code 39-84742[5]
GNIS feature ID 1049324[2]

Whitehall is a city in Franklin County, Ohio, United States and an enclave (suburb) on the east side of Columbus. The population was 18,062 at the 2010 census. The current mayor of Whitehall is Kim Maggard.

Geography[edit]

Whitehall is located at 39°57′49″N 82°52′57″W / 39.96361°N 82.88250°W / 39.96361; -82.88250 (39.963664, -82.882374).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.29 square miles (13.70 km2), of which 5.26 square miles (13.62 km2) is land and 0.03 square miles (0.08 km2) is water.[1] Big Walnut Creek flows through Whitehall.

Like the nearby city of Bexley and villages of Minerva Park and Valleyview, Whitehall is an enclave of Columbus.

Whitehall is a suburban community of Columbus, Ohio in Franklin County. It is in close proximity to the Port Columbus International Airport. The 338th Army Band is stationed there at the Defense Supply Center, Columbus.

City of Whitehall

The city has three elementary schools (Etna Road, Kae Avenue, and Beechwood), one junior high school (Rosemore),and one high school (Whitehall-Yearling High School). Big Walnut Creek along with the Columbus Country Club (part of the City of Columbus) define the eastern border of Whitehall.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1950 4,377
1960 20,818 375.6%
1970 25,283 21.4%
1980 21,295 −15.8%
1990 20,572 −3.4%
2000 19,201 −6.7%
2010 18,062 −5.9%
Est. 2015 18,694 [7] 3.5%
Sources:[8][9][5][10]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 18,062 people, 7,522 households, and 4,406 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,433.8 inhabitants per square mile (1,325.8/km2). There were 8,785 housing units at an average density of 1,670.2 per square mile (644.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 58.8% White, 29.3% African American, 0.5% Native American, 1.5% Asian, 5.5% from other races, and 4.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.9% of the population.

There were 7,522 households of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 31.8% were married couples living together, 19.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 7.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 41.4% were non-families. 34.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 3.07.

The median age in the city was 35 years. 25.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.4% were from 25 to 44; 25.5% were from 45 to 64; and 11.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.6% male and 51.4% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 19,201 people, 8,343 households, and 4,930 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,681.9 people per square mile (1,420.2/km²). There were 8,997 housing units at an average density of 1,725.2 per square mile (665.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 74.40% White, 19.16% African American, 0.39% Native American, 2.04% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.21% from other races, and 2.78% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.95% of the population.

There were 8,343 households out of which 29.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.3% were married couples living together, 16.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.9% were non-families. 35.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the city the population was spread out with 25.3% under the age of 18, 9.4% from 18 to 24, 32.2% from 25 to 44, 21.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 93.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,794, and the median income for a family was $37,296. Males had a median income of $30,896 versus $25,007 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,867. About 11.1% of families and 14.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.3% of those under age 18 and 12.4% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

In the 1940s and 1950s, Whitehall still had working farms, and it was a mixed income area with mainly small houses.[11] It was still a village in the 1940s, and residents filed for incorporation in 1947. In 1952 the borders expanded east to the country club and Big Walnut Creek. Rapid growth meant that it became a city during the 1950s.[12] The first shopping center strip in the country was built and opened in Whitehall in 1948, called Casto's Town and Country.[13] The National Road passed through Whitehall.[14]

In August 1970, two department stores in Whitehall were bombed as part of a robbery scheme. William Harris was arrested after fleeing the scene. He was pursued and captured by motorcyclist Roger Penwell. Penwell pursued despite gunfire. He received the Carnegie Hero Fund's Bronze Medal and was amply rewarded for heroism.[15] Penwell's actions enabled police to locate more of Harris's bombs, saving property and many lives. Harris was a 1st lieutenant in the United States Air Force. [16][17]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  8. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  9. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  10. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  11. ^ Sies, Mary Corbin; Silver, Christopher (1996). Planning the twentieth-century American city. JHU Press. p. 234. ISBN 0-8018-5164-5. 
  12. ^ Burgess, Patricia (1994). Planning for the private interest: land use controls and residential patterns in Columbus, Ohio, 1900-1970. Ohio State University Press. p. 107. ISBN 0-8142-0632-8. 
  13. ^ Lentz, Ed (2003). Columbus: the story of a city. The making of America. Arcadia Publishing. p. 122. ISBN 0-7385-2429-8. 
  14. ^ Wilhelm, Hubert G. H.; Artimus, Keiffer (1996). "From Wheeling to Columbus". In Karl B. Raitz, George F. Thompson. A guide to the National Road. JHU Press. p. 164. ISBN 0-8018-5156-4. 
  15. ^ "Penwell Lauded Again for Bravery". American Motorcyclist. May 1971. Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  16. ^ "Cyclist becomes hero". American Motorcyclist. October 1970. Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  17. ^ "Harris Pleads Innocent to Assault Count". The Portsmouth Times. 18 August 1970. Retrieved 9 March 2011. 

External links[edit]