Whitmore railway station

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Whitmore
Location
PlaceWest of Whitmore
AreaNewcastle-under-Lyme
Coordinates52°57′39″N 2°18′21″W / 52.9609°N 2.3058°W / 52.9609; -2.3058Coordinates: 52°57′39″N 2°18′21″W / 52.9609°N 2.3058°W / 52.9609; -2.3058
Grid referenceSJ795404
Operations
Original companyGrand Junction Railway[1]
Pre-groupingLondon and North Western Railway[1]
Post-groupingLondon, Midland and Scottish Railway
Platforms4
History
4 July 1837Opened[1]
4 February 1952Closed[1]
Disused railway stations in the United Kingdom
Closed railway stations in Britain
A B C D–F G H–J K–L M–O P–R S T–V W–Z

Whitmore was a station serving the village of Whitmore, Staffordshire.

History[edit]

The station opened onto the Grand Junction Railway in 1837[2]:41 when the line itself was built. It opened in Baldwin's Gate village near the edge of Whitmore Parish. This station brought in huge numbers of people as it also served as the nearest station to Newcastle-under-Lyme and the Potteries until the Stoke line opened.

Coronation Scot record[edit]

On 29 June 1937 the Coronation Scot engine created a world record of 114 mph while travelling through Whitmore station giving it world-wide fame.

Buildings and location[edit]

Whitmore station was located off Whitmore road in Baldwins Gate Village. The site of the station can still be seen when the tracks part, showing a grassy area were platforms could have been. A more likely location of the platform is where a siding of road comes down near the track, this could have led to a platform. One station building can still be seen: a building, next to a bridge spanning the track, is in the definite style of ticket office. This means that passengers could buy tickets, then wait or read information before heading down a side road to the platform.

Impact of the station[edit]

The station itself was one of the key factors affecting how Baldwins Gate village was laid out. Only two shops are in the village, and they are both situated next to the line. The line led to land being sold on each side, so the village expanded, and its appearance today is because of the impact of the railway and Station.

Closure[edit]

However Whitmore station slowly began to get less and less business and in 1952 the station was closed.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. p. 249. ISBN 978-1-85260-508-7. OCLC 60251199.
  2. ^ Drake, James (1838). Drake’s Road Book of the Grand Junction Railway (1838). Moorland Reprints. ISBN 0903485257.

Further reading[edit]

Preceding station Historical railways Following station
Standon Bridge
Line open, station closed
  London and North Western Railway
Grand Junction Railway
  Madeley (Staffordshire)
Line open, station closed