Who? Weekly

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Who Weekly
Who Weekly logo.png
Who? Weekly logo
Presentation
Hosted byBobby Finger and Lindsey Weber
GenreComedy, Talk
LanguageEnglish
UpdatesBiweekly
LengthApprox. 45 minutes
Publication
Original release18 January 2016 – present
ProviderHeadGum
Websitewww.whoweekly.us

Who? Weekly is a bi-weekly[1] celebrity gossip podcast presented by Bobby Finger and Lindsey Weber, with the subject and tagline "everything you need to know about the celebrities you don't".

History and presenters[edit]

Bobby Finger is a writer at Jezebel. Lindsey Weber is a writer, formerly at Vulture.com and deputy editor at Mel Magazine. Who? Weekly began as an occasional newsletter written by the two of them before spinning off as a podcast.[2][3] The first episode came out on 18 January 2016.[4] The podcast has since been picked up by the HeadGum network.[5]

In February 2017, Finger and Weber were among the first to notice that then-White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer had an open account on mobile payment service Venmo and was being sent and asked for payments as a form of trolling, causing some press attention.[6][7][8]

In October and November 2017, there was a series of live Who? Weekly shows in the United States.[9]

Format[edit]

In each episode, the presenters discuss minor celebrities. Celebrities are categorized as either "Whos" or "Thems" – roughly D-list vs A-list celebrities – according to their name recognition and the nature of their fame. Whos and Thems are named for the likely response to hearing a person's name: "who?" vs "oh, them!".[10] This extends into, for example, describing behavior as "who-y", if it is seen as self-promotional or tacky, for example producing "spon-con" (sponsored content). Episodes alternate between the regular episodes and "Who's There" episodes, which consist of responses to callers' questions and stories. Callers traditionally sign-off with "good form, Bella Thorne", an in-joke from an early episode. Most episodes feature an update on the activities of singer Rita Ora.[2]

Reception[edit]

Slate's Brow Beat described Who? Weekly as "terrific" and said that the show "feels smart and fun because it’s sometimes messy, not in spite of its messiness".[2] The podcast was chosen as one of the best podcasts of 2016 by The New York Times, who said that "the podcast feels delightfully absurd and truly vital in the Trump era"[11] and by Vulture.com, who said it "has quickly become a cult hit".[3] It has also been recommended by Nylon, Esquire, Marie Claire and Vogue.[12][13][14][15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hoepfner, Fran (27 Sep 2017). "Who? Weekly's creators on why they'll never run out of wannabe celebrities to talk about". AV Club. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  2. ^ a b c Brogan, Jacob (15 Apr 2016). "Who? Weekly Is the Perfect Podcast About Celebrities Who Make You Say "Who?"". Slate.com. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  3. ^ a b Quah, Nicholas (12 Dec 2016). "The 10 Best Podcasts of 2016". Vulture. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  4. ^ "Who? Weekly". podbay.fm. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  5. ^ "Who? Weekly". HeadGum. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  6. ^ Kircher, Madison Malone (6 Feb 2017). "Somebody Found Sean Spicer's Venmo and Now People Are Asking Him for Money". NY Magazine | Select All. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  7. ^ Mei, Gina (8 Feb 2007). "Press Secretary Sean Spicer is Getting Trolled On Venmo". Cosmopolitan. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  8. ^ Calfas, Jennifer (7 Feb 2017). "Social media users are asking Sean Spicer for money on Venmo". The Hill. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  9. ^ "Who? Fall 2017 Tour". Who Weekly. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  10. ^ Finger, Bobby; Weber, Lindsey (20 July 2016). "How to Spot Whos, the Ubiquitous Noncelebrities Flooding Your Social Media". The Cut. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  11. ^ Hess, Amanda (6 Dec 2016). "The Best New Podcasts of 2016". The New York Times. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  12. ^ Bryant, Taylor (31 Oct 2016). "15 Podcasts We Can't Stop Listening To Right Now". Nylon. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  13. ^ Dibdin, Emma (14 Oct 2016). "The 25 Essential Podcasts of 2016". Esquire. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  14. ^ Keong, Lori (9 Dec 2016). "The 10 Best New Podcasts of 2016". Marie Claire. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  15. ^ Garcia, Patricia (20 Dec 2017). "11 Great Podcasts For Holiday Travel This Year". Vogue. Retrieved 8 January 2018.

External links[edit]