WiGig

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WiGig, alternatively known as 60GHz Wi-Fi,[1] refers to a set of 60 GHz wireless network protocols.[2] It include the current IEEE 802.11ad standard and also the upcoming IEEE 802.11ay standard.[3]

The WiGig specification allows devices to communicate without wires at multi-gigabit speeds. It enables high performance wireless data, display and audio applications that supplement the capabilities of previous wireless LAN devices. WiGig tri-band enabled devices, which operate in the 2.4, 5 and 60 GHz bands, deliver data transfer rates up to 7 Gbit/s (for 11ad), about as fast as an 8-band 802.11ac transmission, and more than 11 times faster than the highest 802.11n rate, while maintaining compatibility with existing Wi-Fi devices. The 60 GHz millimeter wave signal cannot typically penetrate walls but can propagate off reflections from walls, ceilings, floors and objects using beamforming built into the WiGig system. When roaming away from the main room, the protocol can switch to make use of the other lower bands at a much lower rate, both of which can propagate through walls.[4][5]

The name WiGig come from Wireless Gigabit Alliance, the original association being formed to promote the adaption of IEEE 802.11ad, however it is now certified by Wi-Fi Alliance.[6]

History[edit]

  • In May 2009, formation of Wireless Gigabit Alliance was announced to promote the IEEE 802.11ad protocol.[7][8][9][10][11][12]
  • In December 2009, The completed version 1.0 WiGig specification was announced.[13][14][15][16][17]
  • In May 2010, WiGig Alliance announced the publication of its specification, the opening of its Adopter Program, and the liaison agreement with the Wi-Fi Alliance to cooperate on the expansion of Wi-Fi technologies.[18][19]
  • In June 2011, WiGig announced the release of its certification-ready version 1.1 specification.[18]
  • In December 2012, the IEEE Standards Association published IEEE 802.11ad-2012 as an amendment to the overall IEEE 802.11 standard family.[20]
  • In 2016, Wi-Fi Alliance launched certification program for WiGig products.[21]
  • The second generation WiGig standard, IEEE 802.11ay, is expected to be published in year 2019.

Specification[edit]

The WiGig MAC and PHY Specification, version 1.1 includes the following capabilities:[18][22]

  • Supports data transmission rates up to 7 Gbit/s – a bit over eleven times as fast as the highest 802.11n rate
  • Supplements and extends the 802.11 Media Access Control (MAC) layer and is backward compatible with the IEEE 802.11 standard
  • Physical layer enables low power and high performance WiGig devices, guaranteeing interoperability and communication at gigabit per second rates
  • Protocol adaptation layers are being developed to support specific system interfaces including data buses for PC peripherals and display interfaces for HDTVs, monitors and projectors
  • Support for beamforming, enabling robust communication at up to 10 meters. The beams can move within the coverage area through modification of the transmission phase of individual antenna elements, which is called phase array antenna beamforming.
  • Widely used advanced security and power management for WiGig devices

Applications[edit]

On November 3, 2010, WiGig Alliance announced the WiGig version 1.0 A/V and I/O protocol adaptation layer (PAL) specifications.[18] The application specifications have been developed to support specific system interfaces including extensions for PC peripherals and display interfaces for HDTVs, monitors and projectors.

WiGig Display Extension

WiGig Bus Extension and WiGig Serial Extension. The WiGig Bus Extension (WBE) was available to members in 2011.[23]

  • Define high-performance wireless implementations of widely used computer interfaces over 60 GHz
  • Enable multi-gigabit wireless connectivity between any two devices, such as connection to storage and other high-speed peripherals

Competition[edit]

WiGig competes with other 60 GHz frequency band transmission standards like WirelessHD in some applications.

Channels[edit]

Channel Center (GHz) Min. (GHz) Max. (GHz) BW (GHz)
1 58.32 57.24 59.40 2.16
2 60.48 59.40 61.56
3 62.64 61.56 63.72
4 64.80 63.72 65.88
5 66.96 65.88 68.04
6 69.12 68.04 70.20

Regional spectrum allocations vary by region limiting the available number of channels in some regions. So far, the US is the only region supporting all six channels while other regions are considering to follow suit. [24]

Single-carrier and Control-PHY data rates[edit]

MCS
index
Modulation
type
Coding
rate
Phy rate (Mbit/s) Sensitivity power
(dBm)
Tx EVM
(dB)
0 (Control-PHY) DSSS with 32 ​π2-BPSK chips per bit 1/2 27.5 −78 −6
1 π2-BPSK (with each bit repeated twice) 1/2 385 −68 −6
2 1/2 770 −66 −7
3 5/8 962.5 −65 −9
4 3/4 1155 −64 −10
5 13/16 1251.25 −62 −12
6 π2-QPSK 1/2 1540 −63 −11
7 5/8 1925 −62 −12
8 3/4 2310 −61 −13
9 13/16 2502.5 −59 −15
10 π2-16-QAM 1/2 3080 −55 −19
11 5/8 3850 −54 −20
12 3/4 4620 −53 −21

OFDM data rates[edit]

MCS
index
Modulation
type
Coding
rate
Phy rate
(Mbit/s)
Sensitivity
(dBm)
EVM
(dB)
13 SQPSK 1/2 693 −66 −7
14 5/8 866.25 −64 −9
15 QPSK 1/2 1386 −63 −10
16 5/8 1732.5 −62 −11
17 3/4 2079 −60 −13
18 16-QAM 1/2 2772 −58 −15
19 5/8 3465 −56 −17
20 3/4 4158 −54 −19
21 13/16 4504.5 −53 −20
22 64-QAM 5/8 5197.5 −51 −22
23 3/4 6237 −49 −24
24 13/16 6756.75 −47 −26

Low-power single-carrier data rates[edit]

MCS
index
Modulation
type
Coding
rate
Phy rate
(Mbit/s)
Sensitivity
(dBm)
EVM
(dB)
25 π2-BPSK 13/28 626 −64 −7
26 13/21 834 −60 −9
27 52/63 1112 −57 −10
28 π2-QPSK 13/28 1251 −12
29 13/21 1668 −12
30 52/63 2224 −13
31 13/14 2503 −15

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "IEEE 802.11ad 60GHz Microwave Wi-Fi".
  2. ^ "Understanding 60 GHz Wireless Network Protocols".
  3. ^ "Wi-Fi Alliance rebrands 802.11ac as Wi-Fi 5, picks 802.11ax as Wi-Fi 6". 3 October 2018.
  4. ^ "Is 802.11ad the Ultimate Cable Replacement?". Broadband Technology Report (BTR).
  5. ^ "Millimeter Wave Propagation: Spectrum Management Implications" (PDF). FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION OFFICE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, Bulletin Number 70 July, 1997).
  6. ^ "What is WiGig". 5g.co.uk.
  7. ^ "IEEE 802.11ad: directional 60 GHz communication for multi-Gigabit-per-second Wi-Fi [Invited Paper]". December 11, 2014. Retrieved June 19, 2018.
  8. ^ Higginbotham, Stacey (May 6, 2009). "WiGig Alliance to Push 6 Gbps Wireless in the Home". GigaOm. Retrieved November 14, 2013.
  9. ^ Takahash, Dean (2009-05-06). "WiGig Alliance seeks to bring super-fast wireless video transfer to homes". VentureBeat.
  10. ^ "WiGig Unites 60 GHz Wireless Development". Wi-Fi Net News.
  11. ^ Higgins, Tim (2009-05-08). "Why WiGig?". Small Net Builder.
  12. ^ Reardon, Marguerite (2009-05-07). "Tech giants back superfast WiGig standard". CNET.
  13. ^ Murph, Darren (2009-12-10). "WiGig Alliance completes multi-gigabit 60 GHz wireless specification: let the streaming begin". Engadget.
  14. ^ Merritt, Rick (2009-12-10). "WiGig group gives first peak at 60 Ghz spec". EE Times.
  15. ^ Hachman, Mark (2009-12-10). "WiGig Alliance Finalizes Spec, Tri-Band Wi-Fi in 2010?". PC Mag.
  16. ^ Takahashi, Dean (2009-12-10). "WiGig Alliance creates next-generation wireless networking standard". Venture Beat.
  17. ^ Lawson, Stephen (2009-12-10). "WiGig Fast Wireless Group Finishes Standard". PC Mag.
  18. ^ a b c d "WiGig Alliance Announces Completion of its Multi-Gigabit Wireless Specification". Businesswire.
  19. ^ "Wi-Fi Alliance and WiGig Alliance to Cooperate on Expansion of Wi-Fi Technologies". PR Newswire.
  20. ^ IEEE Standard for Information technology--Telecommunications and information exchange between systems—Local and metropolitan area networks—Specific requirements-Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) Specifications Amendment 3: Enhancements for Very High Throughput in the 60 GHz Band. IEEE SA. December 24, 2012. doi:10.1109/IEEESTD.2012.6392842.
  21. ^ "Wi-Fi Alliance makes WiGig official for 60 GHz multi-gigabit networking". www.cablinginstall.com.
  22. ^ "WiGig Alliance Specifications Page". WiGig Alliance.
  23. ^ Robinson, Daniel (2011-06-28). "WiGig Alliance issues 1.1 update for next-generation wireless". V3.co.
  24. ^ Wi-Fi CERTIFIED WiGig™: Wi-Fi® expands to 60 GHz , Wi-Fi Alliance, October 2016 wp_Wi-Fi_CERTIFIED_WiGig_20161024.pdf