Wickahoney Post Office and Stage Station

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Wickahoney Post Office and Stage Station
JW Dunning at Wickahoney.jpg
Historic photo of the building
Wickahoney Post Office and Stage Station is located in Idaho
Wickahoney Post Office and Stage Station
Wickahoney Post Office and Stage Station is located in the US
Wickahoney Post Office and Stage Station
Location Wickahoney Creek, Wickahoney, Idaho
Coordinates 42°27′22″N 115°59′02″W / 42.456086°N 115.983875°W / 42.456086; -115.983875Coordinates: 42°27′22″N 115°59′02″W / 42.456086°N 115.983875°W / 42.456086; -115.983875
Area less than one acre
NRHP reference # 82002514[1]
Added to NRHP May 27, 1982

The Wickahoney Post Office and Stage Station is an abandoned post office and stagecoach station which served the community of Wickahoney, Idaho. The building was built with lava rock and featured a wooden porch and a shingled roof with seven gables. It served as Wickahoney's post office from 1895 to 1911. In addition, the building was a stagecoach stop on the route between Mountain Home, Idaho and Mountain City, Nevada. The route brought supplies to mines in northern Nevada and was considered to be Wickahoney's best chance at economic success. However, a stagecoach route through Elko, Nevada supplanted the route through Wickahoney, and the community eventually faded away. The post office building is now located in a remote desert area; while its isolation helped preserve the building long after the stagecoach route ended, it has lost its roof and porch.[2][3]

The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places on May 27, 1982.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ Hibbard, Don (March 29, 1982). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory - Nomination Form: Wickahoney Post Office and Stage Station" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved December 28, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Historic Mountain Home". MHHS64.org. Retrieved December 28, 2013.