Help:Family trees

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This page aims to assist Wikipedians working with biographical articles containing family trees.

The most common way is to display a family tree on Wikipedia is as an ahnentafel by Template: Ahnentafel. However, there are other options.

This page originated in examples taken from a discussion on the Village pump in March/April 2005 (see Talk page). It has since been updated to use later created templates.

Ahnentafel[edit]

The simplest way to include a list of ancestors is the Ahnentafel. This is a standard for genealogists, but it is hard to understand for people who have not seen it before.

  1. Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (born 21 June 1982)
  2. Charles, Prince of Wales (born 14 November 1948)
  3. Diana, Princess of Wales née Lady Diana Spencer (1 July 1961 – 31 August 1997)
  4. Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (born 10 June 1921)
  5. Elizabeth II (born 21 April 1926)
  6. John Spencer, 8th Earl Spencer (24 January 1924 – 29 March 1992)
  7. The Hon Mrs Shand Kydd née The Hon Frances Roche (20 January 1936 – 3 June 2004)
  8. ...

Ahnentafels can be displayed as horizontal trees using Template:Ahnentafel:

{{ahnentafel
|collapsed=yes |align=center
|title=Ancestry of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge
|boxstyle_1=background-color: #fcc;
|boxstyle_2=background-color: #fb9;
|boxstyle_3=background-color: #ffc;
|boxstyle_4=background-color: #bfc;
|1. '''[[Prince William, Duke of Cambridge]]'''
|2. [[Charles, Prince of Wales]]
|3. [[Diana, Princess of Wales|Lady Diana Spencer]]
|4. [[Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh|Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark]]
|5. [[Elizabeth II|Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom]]
|6. [[John Spencer, 8th Earl Spencer]]
|7. [[Frances Shand Kydd|The Honourable Frances Roche]]
|8. [[Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark]]
|9. [[Princess Alice of Battenberg]]
|10. [[George VI|George VI of the United Kingdom]]
|11. [[Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother|Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon]]
|12. [[Albert Spencer, 7th Earl Spencer]]
|13. [[Cynthia Spencer, Countess Spencer|Lady Cynthia Hamilton]]
|14. [[Maurice Roche, 4th Baron Fermoy]]
|15. [[Ruth Roche, Baroness Fermoy|Ruth Gill]]
}}

Ancestry trees are usually displayed collapsed; to display them expanded add the parameter: |collapsed=no to {{ahnentafel}}

Chart template[edit]

Template:Chart can be used to construct simple (or incredibly complex: see Japanese imperial family tree) using an ASCII art-like syntax:

{{chart top|My family tree}}
{{chart/start|align=center}}
{{chart| | | | GRM |~|y|~| GRP | | GRM=Grandma|GRP=Grandpa}}
{{chart| | | | | | | |)|-|-|-|.| }}
{{chart| | | MUM |y| DAD | |DAISY| MUM=Mum|DAD=Dad|DAISY=Aunt Daisy}}
{{chart| |,|-|-|-|+|-|-|-|.| | | }}
{{chart| JOE | | ME | | SIS | | | JOE=My brother Joe|ME='''Me!'''|SIS=My little sister}}
       |boxstyle_ ME=background-color: #bfc;}}
{{chart/end}}
{{chart bottom}}
My family tree
GrandmaGrandpa
MumDadAunt Daisy
My brother JoeMe!My little sister

{{Chart}} can also be used to create a Continental European style bottom to top layout for an Ahnentafel tree, or just as easily a top down (not shown)

{{chart top|width=100%|European style family tree bottom to top (Prince William, Duke of Cambridge)}}
{{chart/start|align=center}}
{{chart| |boxstyle=background-color: #bfc|Ah8|v|Ah9| |Ah10|v|Ah11| | |  |Ah12|v|Ah13| | |Ah14|v|Ah15|
  |Ah8=8. [[Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark]] |Ah9=9. [[Princess Alice of Battenberg]]
  |Ah10=10. [[George VI|George VI of the United Kingdom]] |Ah11=11. [[Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother|Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon]]
  |Ah12=12. [[Albert Spencer, 7th Earl Spencer]]  |Ah13=13. [[Cynthia Spencer, Countess Spencer|Lady Cynthia Hamilton]]
  |Ah14=14. [[Maurice Roche, 4th Baron Fermoy]]  |Ah15=15. [[Ruth Roche, Baroness Fermoy|Ruth Gill]]}}
{{chart| | | | |!| | | | | | | |!| | | | | | | | | |!| | | | | | | | |!}}
{{chart|boxstyle=background-color: #ffc;| | | |Ah4|-|-|v|-|-|Ah5| | | | | |  | |Ah6|-|-|-|v|-|-|Ah7 
  |Ah4=4. [[Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh|Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark]] |Ah5=5. [[Elizabeth II|Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom]] 
  |Ah6=6. [[John Spencer, 8th Earl Spencer]]  |Ah7=7. [[Frances Shand Kydd|The Honourable Frances Roche]]
  }}
{{chart| | | | | | | | |!| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |!}}
{{chart|boxstyle=background-color: #fb9;| | | | | | | |Ah2|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|v|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|Ah3
  |Ah2=2. [[Charles, Prince of Wales]]|Ah3=3. [[Diana, Princess of Wales|Lady Diana Spencer]]}}
{{chart| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |!}}
{{chart|boxstyle=background-color: #fcc;| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |Ah1  |Ah1=1.'''[[Prince William, Duke of Cambridge]]'''}}
{{chart/end}}
{{chart bottom}}

Note: any letter number combination that is not reserved as a tile descriptor in {{chart}} can be used. In this example Ah1...Ah15 is short for Ahnentafel1...Ahnentafel15


European style family tree bottom to top (Prince William, Duke of Cambridge)
8. Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark9. Princess Alice of Battenberg10. George VI of the United Kingdom11. Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon12. Albert Spencer, 7th Earl Spencer13. Lady Cynthia Hamilton14. Maurice Roche, 4th Baron Fermoy15. Ruth Gill
4. Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark5. Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom6. John Spencer, 8th Earl Spencer7. The Honourable Frances Roche
2. Charles, Prince of Wales3. Lady Diana Spencer
1.Prince William, Duke of Cambridge

Trees using {{chart}} are usually displayed collapsed to alter that so they display expanded add the parameter: |collapsed=no to {{chart top}}

Note: Template:Familytree has been deprecated in favor of Template:Chart, which has more features.

Ahnentafel-chart[edit]

A similar use of {{chart}} can be used to construct a top down tree, but there is a template ({{Ahnentafel-chart}}) that can be used to display bottom-up or top-down family trees using {{chart}} that is simpler to construct:

{{chart top|width=100%|European style family tree bottom to top (Prince William, Duke of Cambridge)}}
{{Ahnentafel-chart|top_down=1}}
 |1=1. [[Prince William, Duke of Cambridge]]
 |2=2. [[Charles, Prince of Wales]]
 |3=3. [[Diana, Princess of Wales|Lady Diana Spencer]]
 |4=4. [[Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh|Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark]]
 |5=5. [[Elizabeth II|Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom]]  
 |6=6. [[John Spencer, 8th Earl Spencer]]
 |7=7. [[Frances Shand Kydd|The Honourable Frances Roche]]
 |8=8. [[Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark]]
 |9=9. [[Princess Alice of Battenberg]]
 |10=10. [[George VI|George VI of the United Kingdom]]
 |11=11. [[Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother|Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon]]
 |12=12. [[Albert Spencer, 7th Earl Spencer]]
 |13=13. [[Cynthia Spencer, Countess Spencer|Lady Cynthia Hamilton]]
 |14=14. [[Maurice Roche, 4th Baron Fermoy]]  
 |15=15. [[Ruth Roche, Baroness Fermoy|Ruth Gill]]
}}
{{chart bottom}}
European style family tree bottom to top (Prince William, Duke of Cambridge)
1. Prince William, Duke of Cambridge
2. Charles, Prince of Wales3. Lady Diana Spencer
4. Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark5. Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom6. John Spencer, 8th Earl Spencer7. The Honourable Frances Roche
8. Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark9. Princess Alice of Battenberg10. George VI of the United Kingdom11. Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon12. Albert Spencer, 7th Earl Spencer13. Lady Cynthia Hamilton14. Maurice Roche, 4th Baron Fermoy15. Ruth Gill

For documentation and more examples see the documentation for {{Ahnentafel-chart}}.

Tree list[edit]

Each branch of the tree is built using nested lists. In order to display the final branches properly, it is necessary to use the template {{Tree list/final branch}} like so:

{{hidden begin|border=1px  #aaa solid|title=Demonstration tree|ta1=center}}
{{Tree list}}
* A first level branch
** A second level branch
*** A third level branch
*** Another third level branch
*** {{Tree list/final branch}} The final third level branch
** Another second level branch
** {{Tree list/final branch}} The final second level branch
{{Tree list/end}}
{{Hidden end}}

which produces

Demonstration tree
  • A first level branch
    • A second level branch
      • A third level branch
      • Another third level branch
      • The final third level branch
    • Another second level branch
    • The final second level branch

For an example see the following template link {{Houston family tree}}. For more details on this method see the following template link {{Tree list}}. The templates examples include "Descendants of Herny VII of England" and "Ancestry of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge".

Trees using {{Tree list}} are usually displayed collapsed to alter that so they display expanded add the parameter: |expanded=true to {{hidden begin}}

Ahnentafel-tree[edit]

The template {{ahnentafel-tree}} uses {{Tree list}} and will handle up to an ahnentafel of 511 places (9 generations), but will also display as little as one generation.

 {{Ahnentafel-tree
 |title=Parents of subject
 |1=''subject''
 |2=''father''
 |3=''mother''
 }}
Parents of subject

1. subject

    • 2. father
    • 3. mother

Tables[edit]

Main Help:Table

A family tree can also be displayed using tables, by showing borders on selected cells (note that this does not work properly on all browsers).

This is a family tree using tables for House Tully:

Hoster Tully
*242?
Minisa Whent
†273? in childbed
Brynden Tully
‘The Blackfish’
*247?
Eddard Stark
*262
282 Catelyn
*268
Lysa
*270
282 Jon Arryn
*222? †297
Edmure
*272
 
Robb
*283
Sansa
*286
Arya
*288
Brandon
*290
Rickon
*294
Robert
*291

To fully understand how it works, this is the same table with all table borders:

Hoster Tully
*242?
Minisa Whent
†273? in childbed
Brynden Tully
‘The Blackfish’
*247?
Eddard Stark
*262
282 Catelyn
*268
Lysa
*270
282 Jon Arryn
*222? †297
Edmure
*272
 
Robb
*283
Sansa
*286
Arya
*288
Brandon
*290
Rickon
*294
Robert
*291

S-anc and S-fam[edit]

{{S-anc}} is useful for noble houses and family names with a need to be brief in ancestral trees. Unlike many current forms, it does not include unnecessary descriptors such as grandfather and great grandmother, but it does allow for royal house names and mother and father titles. It is derived from CSS templates instead of many lines of unnecessary code. The template is available at {{s-anc}} although it requires {{s-fam}} and {{end}} or {{s-ref}} to function properly. In the end, it appears as this when completed:

{{s-fam}}
{{s-anc
|name=Page Name or Custom name
|F=Father
|Ftitle=King of Something
|FF=Grandfather
|FFH=Grandfather's House
|FM=Grandmother
|FMH=Grandmother's House
|M=Mother
|Mtitle=Queen of Something
|MF=Grandfather
|MFH=Grandfather's House
|MM=Grandmother
|MMH=Grandmother's House}}
{{s-ref|Cite your sources here}}

The first ahnentafel, published by Michaël Eytzinger in Thesaurus principum hac aetate in Europa viventium Cologne: 1590, pp. 146–147, in which Eytzinger first illustrates his new functional theory of numeration of ancestors; this schema showing Henry III of France as n° 1, de cujus, with his ancestors in five generations. The remainder of the volume shows 34 additional schemas for rulers and princes of Europe using his new method.

An ahnentafel (German for "ancestor table"; German: [ˈʔaːnənˌtaːfəl]) or ahnenreihe ("ancestor series"; German: [ˈʔaːnənˌʁaɪə]) is a genealogical numbering system for listing a person's direct ancestors in a fixed sequence of ascent. The subject (or proband) of the ahnentafel is listed as No. 1, the subject's father as No. 2 and the mother as No. 3, the paternal grandparents as No. 4 and No. 5 and the maternal grandparents as No. 6 and No. 7, and so on, back through the generations. Apart from No. 1, who can be male or female, all even-numbered persons are male, and all odd-numbered persons are female. In this schema, the number of any person's father is double the person's number, and a person's mother is double the person's number plus one. Using this definition of numeration, one can derive some basic information about individuals who are listed without additional research.

This construct displays a person's genealogy compactly, without the need for a diagram such as a family tree. It is particularly useful in situations where one may be restricted to presenting a genealogy in plain text, for example, in e-mails or newsgroup articles. In effect, an ahnentafel is a method for storing a binary tree in an array by listing the nodes (individuals) in level-order (in generation order).

The ahnentafel system of numeration is also known as: the Eytzinger Method, for Michaël Eytzinger, the Austrian-born historian who first published the principles of the system in 1590;[1] the Sosa Method, named for Jerónimo (Jerome) de Sosa, the Spanish genealogist who popularized the numbering system in his work Noticia de la gran casa de los marqueses de Villafranca in 1676;[2] and the Sosa–Stradonitz Method, for Stephan Kekulé von Stradonitz, the genealogist and son of Friedrich August Kekulé, who published his interpretation of Sosa's method in his Ahnentafel-atlas in 1898.[3]

"Ahnentafel" is a loan word from the German language, and its German equivalents are Ahnenreihe and Ahnenliste. An ahnentafel list is sometimes called a "Kekulé" after Stephan Kekulé von Stradonitz. A variant of is known in French as Seize Quartiers.

Inductive reckoning[edit]

To find out what someone's number would be without compiling a list, one must first trace how they relate back to the subject or person of interest, meaning one records that someone is the subject's father's mother's mother's father's father's ... Once one has done that, one can use two methods.

First method[edit]

Use the definition that a father's number will be twice that individual's number, or a mother's will be twice plus one, and just multiply and add 1 accordingly. For instance, someone can find out what number Sophia of Hanover would be on an ahnentafel of Peter Phillips. She is Phillips's mother's mother's father's father's father's mother's father's father's father's father's father's mother. So, we multiply and add:

1×2 + 1 = 3
3×2 + 1 = 7
7×2 = 14
14×2 = 28
28×2 = 56
56×2 + 1 = 113
113×2 = 226
226×2 = 452
452×2 = 904
904×2 = 1808
1808×2 = 3616
3616×2 + 1 = 7233

Thus, if we were to make an ahnentafel for Peter Phillips, Electress Sophia would be #7233.

Second method[edit]

This is an elegant and concise way to visualize the genealogical chain between the subject and the ancestor.

1. Write down the digit "1", which represents the subject, and, writing from left to right, write "0" for each "father" and "1" for each "mother" in the relation, ending with the ancestor of interest. The result will be the binary representation of the ancestor's ahnentafel number. Using the Sophia example, there is a translation of the chain of relations into a chain of digits.

Sophia = Peter's mother's mother's father's father's father's mother's father's father's father's father's father's mother
Sophia = 1110001000001

2. If needed, convert the ahnentafel number from its binary to its decimal form.

Sophia = 1110001000001
Sophia = 7233

Deductive reckoning[edit]

We can also work backwards and find what the relation is from the number.

Reverse first method[edit]

  1. One starts out by seeing if the number is odd or even.
  2. If it is odd, the last part of the relation is "mother," so subtract 1 and divide by 2.
  3. If it is even, the last part is "father," and one divides by 2.
  4. Repeat steps 2–3, and build back from the last word.
  5. Once one gets to 1, one is done.

On an ahnentafel of Prince William, John Wark is number 116. We follow the steps:

116/2 = 58 58/2 = 29 29 − 1 = 28 and 28/2 = 14 14/2 = 7 7 − 1 = 6 and 6/2 = 3 3 − 1 = 2 and 2/2 = 1
father father mother father mother mother

We reverse that, and we get that #116, John Wark, is Prince William's mother's mother's father's mother's father's father.

Reverse second method[edit]

1. Convert the ahnentafel number from decimal to binary.

John Wark = 116
John Wark = 1110100

2. Replace the leftmost "1" with the subject's name and replace each following "0" and "1" with "father" and "mother" respectively.

John Wark = 1110100
John Wark = Prince William's mother's mother's father's mother's father's father
Demonstration
decimal binary relation
1 1 proband
2 10 father
3 11 mother
4 100 paternal grandfather
5 101 paternal grandmother
6 110 maternal grandfather
7 111 maternal grandmother
8 1000 father's father's father
9 1001 father's father's mother
10 1010 father's mother's father
11 1011 father's mother's mother
12 1100 mother's father's father
13 1101 mother's father's mother
14 1110 mother's mother's father
15 1111 mother's mother's mother

Calculation of the generation number[edit]

The generation number can be calculated as the logarithm to base 2 of the ahnentafel number, and rounding down to a full integer by truncating decimal digits.

For example, the number 38 is between 25=32 and 26=64, so log2(38) is between 5 and 6. This means that ancestor no.38 belongs to generation five, and was a great-great-great-grandparent of the reference person who is no.1 (generation zero).

Example[edit]

The example, shown below, is an ahnentafel of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, listing all of his ancestors up to his fourth great-grandparents.

  1. Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (born 21 June 1982)
  2. Charles, Prince of Wales (born 14 November 1948)
  3. Diana, Princess of Wales (1 July 1961 – 31 August 1997)
  4. Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (born 10 June 1921)
  5. Elizabeth II, Queen of the United Kingdom et al. (born 21 April 1926)
  6. Edward Spencer, 8th Earl Spencer (24 January 1924 – 29 March 1992)
  7. Frances Roche (20 January 1936 – 3 June 2004)
  8. Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark (20 January 1882 – 3 December 1944)
  9. Princess Alice of Battenberg (25 February 1885 – 5 December 1969)
  10. George VI, King of the United Kingdom et al. (14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952)
  11. Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother (4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002)
  12. Albert Spencer, 7th Earl Spencer (23 May 1892 – 9 June 1975)
  13. Cynthia Hamilton (16 August 1897 – 4 December 1972)
  14. Maurice Roche, 4th Baron Fermoy (15 May 1885 – 8 July 1955)
  15. Ruth Gill (2 October 1908 – 6 July 1993)
  16. George I, King of the Hellenes (24 December 1845 – 18 March 1913)
  17. Grand Duchess Olga Konstantinovna of Russia (3 September 1851 – 18 June 1926)
  18. Prince Louis of Battenberg, later Louis Mountbatten, 1st Marquess of Milford Haven (24 May 1854 – 11 September 1921)
  19. Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine (5 April 1863 – 24 September 1950)
  20. George V, King of the United Kingdom (3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936)
  21. Mary of Teck (26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953)
  22. Claude Bowes-Lyon, 14th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne (14 March 1855 – 7 November 1944)
  23. Cecilia Cavendish-Bentinck (11 September 1862 – 23 June 1938)
  24. Charles Robert Spencer, 6th Earl Spencer (30 October 1857 – 26 September 1922)
  25. Margaret Baring (14 December 1868 – 4 July 1906)
  26. James Hamilton, 3rd Duke of Abercorn (30 November 1869 – 12 September 1953)
  27. Rosalind Bingham (26 February 1869 – 18 January 1958)
  28. James Roche, 3rd Baron Fermoy (28 July 1852 – 30 October 1920)
  29. Frances Work (27 October 1857 – 26 January 1947)
  30. Colonel William Smith Gill (16 February 1865 – 25 December 1957)
  31. Ruth Littlejohn (4 December 1879 – 24 August 1964)
  32. Christian IX, King of Denmark (8 April 1818 – 29 January 1906)
  33. Princess Louise of Hesse-Kassel (7 September 1817 – 29 September 1898)
  34. Grand Duke Konstantin Nikolayevich of Russia (9 September 1827 – 13 January 1892)
  35. Grand Duchess Aleksandra Iosifovna of Russia (8 July 1830 – 23 June 1911)
  36. Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine (15 July 1823 – 15 December 1888)
  37. Julia von Hauke (12 November 1825 – 19 September 1895)
  38. Ludwig IV, Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine (12 September 1837 – 13 March 1892)
  39. The Princess Alice (25 April 1843 – 14 December 1878)
  40. Edward VII, King of the United Kingdom (9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910)
  41. Princess Alexandra of Denmark (1 December 1844 – 20 November 1925)
  42. Prince Francis, Duke of Teck (27 August 1837 – 21 January 1900)
  43. Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge (27 November 1833 – 27 October 1897)
  44. Claude Bowes-Lyon, 13th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne (21 July 1824 – 16 February 1904)
  45. Frances Bowes-Lyon, Countess of Strathmore and Kinghorne (1830 – 5 February 1922)
  46. Revd Charles Cavendish-Bentinck (8 November 1817 – 17 August 1865)
  47. Carolina Burnaby (1833 – 6 July 1918)
  48. Frederick Spencer, 4th Earl Spencer (14 April 1798 – 27 December 1857)
  49. Adelaide Spencer, Countess Spencer (27 January 1825 – 29 October 1877)
  50. Edward Baring, 1st Baron Revelstoke (13 April 1828 – 17 July 1897)
  51. Louisa Baring, Baroness Revelstoke (1839 – 16 October 1892)
  52. James Hamilton, 2nd Duke of Abercorn (24 August 1838 – 3 January 1913)
  53. Mary Curzon-Howe (23 July 1848 – 10 May 1929)
  54. Charles Bingham, 4th Earl of Lucan (8 May 1830 – 5 June 1914)
  55. Cecilia Bingham, Countess of Lucan (13 April 1835 – 5 October 1910)
  56. Edmond Roche, 1st Baron Fermoy (August 1815 – 17 September 1874)
  57. Elizabeth Roche, Baroness Fermoy (9 August 1821 – 26 April 1897)
  58. Frank Work (10 February 1819 – 16 March 1911)
  59. Ellen Wood (18 July 1831 – 22 February 1877)
  60. Alexander Ogston Gill
  61. Barbara Smith Marr (died ca. 30 June 1898)
  62. David Littlejohn (3 April 1841 – 11 May 1924)
  63. Jane Crombie (died 19 September 1917)
  64. Friedrich Wilhelm, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (4 January 1785 – 17 February 1831)
  65. Princess Louise Caroline of Hesse-Kassel (28 September 1789 – 13 March 1867)
  66. Landgrave Wilhelm of Hesse-Kassel (24 December 1787 – 5 September 1867)
  67. Princess Louise Charlotte of Denmark (30 October 1789 – 28 March 1864)
  68. Nicholas I, Tsar of all the Russias (25 June 1796 – 18 February 1855)
  69. Aleksandra Feodorovna, Empress of Russia (13 July 1798 – 20 October 1860)
  70. Joseph, Duke of Saxe-Altenburg (27 August 1789 – 25 January 1868)
  71. Duchess Amelia of Württemberg (28 June 1799 – 28 November 1848)
  72. Ludwig II, Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine (26 December 1777 – 16 June 1848)
  73. Princess Wilhelmine of Baden (10 September 1788 – 27 January 1836)
  74. Count Moritz von Hauke (26 October 1775 – 29 November 1830)
  75. Countess Moritz von Hauke (1790 – 27 August 1831)
  76. Prince Karl of Hesse and by Rhine (23 April 1809 – 20 March 1877)
  77. Princess Elizabeth of Prussia (18 June 1815 – 21 March 1885)
  78. Albert, Prince Consort (26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861)
  79. Queen Victoria (24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901)
  80. = 78
  81. = 79
  82. = 32
  83. = 33
  84. Duke Alexander of Württemberg (9 September 1804 – 4 July 1885)
  85. Countess Claudine Rhédey von Kis-Rhéde (21 September 1812 – 1 October 1841)
  86. Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge (24 February 1774 – 8 July 1850)
  87. Princess Augusta of Hesse-Kassel (25 July 1797 – 6 April 1889)
  88. Thomas George Bowes-Lyon, Lord Glamis (6 February 1801 – 27 January 1834)
  89. Charlotte Grimstead (22 January 1797 – 19 January 1881)
  90. Oswald Smith (7 July 1794 – 18 June 1863)
  91. Henrietta Hodgson
  92. Lord Charles Bentinck (3 October 1780 – 28 April 1826)
  93. Anne Wellesley (1788 – 19 March 1875)
  94. Edwyn Burnaby (29 September 1798 – 18 July 1867)
  95. Anne Salisbury (1805 – 3 May 1881)
  96. George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer (1 September 1758 – 10 November 1834)
  97. Lavinia Bingham (27 July 1762 – 8 June 1831)
  98. Sir Horace Seymour (22 November 1791 – 23 November 1851)
  99. Elizabeth Palk (died 18 January 1827)
  100. Henry Baring (18 January 1776 – 13 April 1848)
  101. Cecilia Windham (16 February 1803 – 2 September 1874)
  102. John Bulteel (died 10 September 1843)
  103. Elizabeth Grey (10 July 1798 – 8 November 1880)
  104. James Hamilton, 1st Duke of Abercorn (21 January 1811 – 31 October 1885)
  105. Louisa Russell (8 July 1812 – 31 March 1905)
  106. Richard Curzon-Howe, 1st Earl Howe (11 December 1796 – 12 May 1870)
  107. Anne Gore (8 March 1817 – 23 July 1877)
  108. George Bingham, 3rd Earl of Lucan (16 April 1800 – 10 November 1888)
  109. Anne Bingham, Countess of Lucan née Lady Anne Brudenell (29 June 1809 – 2 April 1877)
  110. Charles Gordon-Lennox, 5th Duke of Richmond (3 August 1791 – 21 October 1860)
  111. Caroline Paget (6 June 1796 – 12 March 1874)
  112. Edward Roche (13 July 1771 – 21 March 1855)
  113. Margaret Curtain (1786 – 21 January 1862)
  114. James Boothby (10 February 1791 – 28 October 1850)
  115. Charlotte Cunningham (1799 – 22 January 1893)
  116. John Wark (1783 – 16 April 1823)
  117. Sarah Duncan Boude (15 December 1790 – 17 December 1860)
  118. John Wood (29 July 1785 – 29 January 1848)
  119. Eleanor Strong (ca. 1803 – 9 July 1863)
  120. David Gill
  121. Sarah Ogston
  122. William Smith Marr (27 November 1810 – 13 February 1898)
  123. Helen Bean (1814/5 – 20 July 1852)
  124. William Littlejohn (12 August 1803 – 8 July 1888)
  125. Janet Bentley (26 January 1811 – 1 October 1848)
  126. James Crombie (13 January 1810 – 31 January 1878)
  127. Katharine Forbes (1 December 1812 – 10 April 1893)

The same information in a tree:

Ancestry tree with ahnentafel numbering

1. Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (born 21 June 1982)

Multiple numbers for the same person[edit]

An ancestor may have two or more numbers due to pedigree collapse. For example in the above Ahnentafel for Prince William, Queen Victoria is both no.79 and no.81. She is no.79 because she was the great-great-grandmother of William's grandfather Prince Philip, and she is also no.81 because she was the great-great-grandmother of William's grandmother Queen Elizabeth II. The relationships are easier to follow using the ancestry tree with ahnentafel numbering.

Other German definitions[edit]

Ahnentafel published as an Ariernachweis

European nobility took pride in displaying their descent. In the German language, the term "Ahnentafel" may refer to a list of coats of arms and names of one's ancestors, even when it does not follow the numbered tabular representation given above. In this case the German "Tafel" is taken literally to be a physical "display board" instead of an abstract scheme.

In Nazi Germany, the Law for the Restoration of the Professional Civil Service required a person to prove non-Jewish ancestry with an Ariernachweis (Aryan certificate). The certificate could take the form of entries in the permanent Ahnenpass (that was sorted according to the ahnentafel numbering system) or as entries in a singular Arierschein (Aryan attestation) that was titled "Ahnentafel".

Software[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eytzinger, Michael, Thesaurus principum hac aetate in Europa viventium, quo progenitores eorum... simul ac fratres et sonores inde ab origine reconduntur... usque ad annum..., Cologne: G. Kempensem, 1590 (1591). Note: In commentaries, his surname may appear in variant forms, including: Aitsingeri, Aitsingero, Aitsingerum, Eyzingern.
  2. ^ Jouniaux, Léo, Généalogie : pratique, méthode, recherche, Quercy: Seuil, 2006, pp. 44–45.
  3. ^ Kekulé von Stradonitz, Stephan, Ahnentafel-atlas. Ahnentafeln zu 32 Ahnen der Regenten Europas und ihrer Gemahlinnen, Berlin: J. A. Stargardt, 1898–1904. This volume contains 79 charts of the sovereigns of Europe and their wives.
  4. ^ Schmidt, Tim; Zhou, Rong. Succinct Set-Encoding for State-Space Search (PDF). AAAI Conf. on Artificial Intelligence.

|- | colspan="3" style="border-top: 5px solid #bebebe;" | Notes and references |- | colspan="3" style="text-align:left;"| 1. Cite your sources here |}

ASCII art[edit]

Here is the family tree of House Baratheon:


                   Steffon==+==? Eastermont
                            |
                   +--------+------------------+
                   |        |                  |
     Cersei==+===Robert  Stannis==+==Selyse  Renly
   Lannister |     |              | Florent 
             |     |              |
   +----+----+     +------+       |
   |    |    |     |      |       |  
Joffrey | Tommen  Mya   Edric  Shireen
     Myrcella    Stone  Storm

Alternatively you can render it using box-drawing characters:

                   Steffon━━┯━━? Eastermont
                            │
                   ┌────────┼──────────────────┐
                   │        │                  │
     Cersei━━┯━━━Robert  Stannis━━┯━━Selyse  Renly
   Lannister │     │              │ Florent 
             │     │              │
   ┌────┬────┤     ├──────┐       │
   │    │    │     │      │       │  
Joffrey │ Tommen  Mya   Edric  Shireen
     Myrcella    Stone  Storm

Although this method was common on Wikipedia in the past, ASCII trees are deprecated for two reasons. Large fix-width ASCII templates can cause formating problems on small screens. Secondly because the tables rely on fixed width fonts, their alignment is easily broken by inexperienced editors removing some of the leading spaces, or by characters having different widths. For example in the second tree above although it uses characters in the same place as those in the first one in this section, and there are slight misalignments because the charter widths of "=" and "─" are slightly different.

When this section was originally written an example in article space provided: Family tree of the Greek gods. The last ASCII version of that table had problems with alignment (see Revision of 19 December 2006). It was replaced with one based on the familytree templates (the forerunner of {{chart}} templates) on 31 December 2006.

If you wish to add a family tree to an article but only feel that you could do so using an ASCII layout then add it using ASCII. However it you add one, or come across an ASCII table in an article that has not been converted, then please ask for help at the Help desk for an editor to help you convert it to one of the alternative formats presented on this page.

Image file[edit]

The houses of Lancaster and York during the Wars of the Roses

Complex families can be displayed in an image file. You can use an imagemap to create links to the individuals displayed in the family tree (see Counts of Hainaut family tree, for example).

A major disadvantage of this method is that if the initial image does not meet the requirements of the Verifiability Policy it can be extremely difficult to add the necessary in-line citations to meet those requirements. This means that the whole tree may be removed and under the Verifiability Policy can not be restored to an article unless it meets the requirements of the policy (see Responsibility for providing citations).

Other templates[edit]

Category:Genealogy templates

Family trees on Wikipedia[edit]

See:

See also[edit]