Wikipedia:Notability (sports)

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This guideline is used to help evaluate whether or not a sports person or sports league/organization (amateur or professional) is likely to meet the general notability guideline, and thus merit an article in Wikipedia. The article should provide reliable sources showing that the subject meets the general notability guideline or the sport specific criteria set forth below.[discuss]

If the article meets the criteria set forth below, then it is likely that sufficient sources exist to satisfy the inclusion criteria for a stand-alone article. Failing to meet the criteria in this guideline means that notability will need to be established in other ways (for example, the general notability guideline, or other, topic-specific, notability guidelines).

Please note that the failure to meet these criteria does not mean an article must be deleted; conversely, meeting any of these criteria does not mean that an article must be kept. These are merely rules of thumb which some editors choose to keep in mind when deciding whether or not to keep an article that is on articles for deletion, along with relevant policies and guidelines such as Wikipedia:Verifiability and Wikipedia:Reliable sources.

Applicable policies and guidelines[edit]

All information included in Wikipedia, including articles about sports, must be verifiable. In addition, the subjects of standalone articles should meet the general notability guideline. The guideline on this page provides bright-line guidance to enable editors to determine quickly if a subject is likely to meet the general notability guideline. Information about living persons must meet the more stringent requirements for those types of articles.

Subjects that do not meet the sport-specific criteria outlined in this guideline may still be notable if they meet the general notability guideline or another subject specific notability guideline.

Any athletic entertainment event at which the results are at least partially predetermined or scripted is not covered by this page. For participants in such events (for example, professional wrestling), see WP:ENTERTAINER. At this time there is no consensus that electronic sports participants are covered by the criteria of this guideline.[1]

Sports which are not listed on this page[2] should defer to the § Basic criteria for guidance.

Basic criteria[edit]

A person is presumed to be notable if they have been the subject of significant coverage, that is, multiple published[3] non-trivial[4] secondary sources which are reliable, intellectually independent,[5] and independent of the subject.[6] The guidelines on this page are intended to reflect the fact that sports figures are likely to meet Wikipedia's basic standards of inclusion if they have achieved success in a major international competition at the highest level.

  • Trivial coverage of a subject by secondary sources may be used to support content in an article, but it is not sufficient to establish notability. This includes listings in database sources with low, wide-sweeping generic standards of inclusion, such as Sports Reference's college football and basketball databases.
  • Fan sites and blogs are generally not regarded as reliable sources, and team sites are generally not regarded as independent of the subject. Although statistics sites may be reliable sources, they are not sufficient by themselves to establish notability.[7]
  • Primary sources may be used to support content in an article, but they do not contribute toward proving the notability of a subject.
  • Some sources must be used with particular care when establishing notability, and should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Local sources must be independent of the subject, and must provide reports beyond routine game coverage. Listings of statistics must clearly satisfy the requirement for significant coverage.
  • Sports biographies must include at least one reference to a source providing significant coverage of the subject, excluding database sources. Meeting this requirement alone does not indicate notability, but it does indicate that there are likely sufficient sources to merit a stand-alone article.

Professional sports people[edit]

Athletics/track & field and long-distance running[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for athletes who compete in the field of athletics if they meet any of the criteria below
  1. Finished top 8 in a competition at the highest level outside of the Olympic Games and world championships. Individual events in these championships must contain either several heats or extended fields (e.g., European Athletics Championships, Commonwealth Games, or any of the 6 World Major Marathons).
  2. Finished top 3 in any other major senior-level international competition (this includes prestigious small field meets, e.g., IAAF Diamond League/IAAF Golden League meets, less-prestigious large-scale meets, e.g., Asian Games, and any IAAF Gold Label Road Race that is not explicitly mentioned above)
  3. Have won an individual gold medal at the IAAF World Junior Championships, or Youth World Championships.
  4. Have won their country's senior national championship, with the exception of those that have never been ranked in the top 60 on the IAAF world leading list at the end of a given calendar year
  5. Have won the elite division of multiple notable* road races (including the same race multiple times), or have established a history of highly competitive, non-winning performances in many notable races (at least 10 top-threes)
  6. Have at any time held a world or continental record (including world junior records, world youth bests, and masters age-group world records) ratified or noted by the relevant official body
  7. Owns a mark that placed the athlete in the top 12 in the world for that calendar year in a non-relay event contested or admitted to the senior IAAF World Championships or Olympics, or an equivalent performance over a closely matching imperial distance
  8. Have a non-relay mark listed on the IAAF senior all-time list or equivalent list
  9. Have been inducted into the National Track and Field Hall of Fame or the Road Runners Club of America Hall of Fame.

To non-athletes associated with the sport (or athletes whose main claim to notability is non-athletic activity), significant coverage is likely to exist if they meet the following criteria:

  1. Coaches who have coached many notable athletes, including at least one non-relay Olympic medalist, World champion, or senior World Record holder during the time of the athletes' notable accomplishments.
  2. Coaches who have been the official head coach of an Olympic track and field team for a country with multiple medalists.
  3. Coaches who introduced a notable technique or training method, and are widely credited as the originator.
  4. Clubs that have received major international coverage for their successes and have a résumé composed of many successful Olympians over a long period of time (for example, Irish American Athletic Club). If a club's success is mainly due to one coach, then only the coach is notable.
*Significant coverage is likely to exist for a road race is determined if it meets any one of the following criteria
  1. It has an international elite (as defined by the IAAF standards for that year) field of at least 5 different nationalities.
  2. It receives broadcast or cable television coverage beyond the local market (if coverage is through the internet, the site must be independent of the sport, for example Universal Sports).
  3. It is a directly competitive meeting between several notable performers (at least 5).

The following criteria may also be used to satisfy road race notability, but does not count towards the notability of athletes who compete in these races

  1. It has been the site of exceptional performances or records (bests).
  2. It regularly has more than 5,000 competitors.
  3. It has been held over a unique course or distance consistently over a period of 25 years.

Badminton[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for athletes in badminton if they meet any of the criteria below
  1. Medalist at the highest international teams or singles/doubles championships of a country (e.g., Canadian Open, German Open, Slovak International).
  2. Medalist at tournaments of the BWF Grand Prix Gold and Grand Prix.
  3. Gold medalist at a national teams or singles/doubles championship, for countries that regularly send athletes to the Olympics.

Baseball[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for baseball figures if they:

  1. Are a member of a major Hall of Fame, such as the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum or the Japanese Baseball Hall of Fame.

Some minor league players receive some coverage from reliable sources, but not enough to satisfy the notability criteria for an independent article. In these cases, it may be appropriate to write a short, stub-length bio as a section within the article on the franchise's minor league players (for example, Minnesota Twins minor league players). Such mini-bios should cite reliable sources and conform with Wikipedia policies such as WP:BLP.

Basketball[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for basketball figures if they
  1. Were selected in the first two rounds of the NBA draft.
  2. Have won an award, or led the league in a major statistical category, of the Continental Basketball Association or NBA G League.

Boxing[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for a boxer if they:

  1. Have won a regular/full (non-interim) non-world title listed at Wikipedia:WikiProject Boxing/Title Assessment.
  2. Have been ranked in the world top ten of any weight class by the IBF, WBA, WBC, WBO, or The Ring magazine.
  3. Have fought, as an amateur, in the final of a national amateur championship for an International Boxing Association/Association Internationale de Boxe Amateur (AIBA) affiliated and World Amateur Boxing Championship medal-winning country (for Men, see Medal table (1974–present), for Women see Medal table (2001–present)), or have represented their AIBA affiliated country in a continental (or higher) tournament.

Cricket[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for a cricket figure if they

Additionally, cricketers who have played at the highest domestic level, or in the lower levels of international cricket,[a] may have sufficient coverage about them to justify an article, but it should not be assumed to exist without further proof.

  1. ^ For both of these, a detailed listing of which leagues or competitions are more likely (or not) to have such coverage is maintained by the cricket wikiproject, see WP:OFFICIALCRICKET.

Cue sports (snooker, pool, billiards)[edit]

See Wikipedia:WikiProject Cue sports/Notability, which covers players and other persons, as well as governing bodies, manufacturers, periodicals, tournaments, rulesets, equipment, and venues. It is a WP:PROJPAGE, explaining how WP:Notability applies to the topic area and outlining what is likely/unlikely to be found notable, rather than setting rules or attempting to establish any variances from WP:NBASIC and NSPORT in general.

Curling[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for a curler if they
  1. Have won a World Curling Tour event or participated in a Grand Slam of Curling event.
  2. Have won a medal at one of the following World Curling Federation sanctioned events: the World Junior Curling Championships, World Senior Curling Championships, European Curling Championships, World Mixed Curling Championship, or Pacific-Asia Curling Championships.
  3. Have won a medal at the Canadian Junior Curling Championships.
  4. Have won the Canadian Mixed Curling Championship, Canadian Senior Curling Championship, or Canadian Mixed Doubles Curling Trials.
  5. Are member of the Canadian Curling Hall of Fame or the WCF Hall of Fame.

Cycling[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for a male cyclist if he meets:

  1. Won a UCI World Tour;
  2. Won (a stage, or an overall individual classification) a Grand Tour or finished on the podium of a Monument;
  3. Won the UCI World Championships or UCI World Cup;
  4. Won Gold at an international multi-sport event (games) (also includes races like the World University Cycling Championship);
  5. Won a UCI category race (minimum classification 1.1 / 2.1, including Continental and National Championships).

Significant coverage is likely to exist for a female cyclist if she:

  1. Won the UCI World Championships or UCI World Cup;
  2. Won a UCI category race (including Continental and National Championships);
  3. Won Gold at an international multi-sport event (games) (also includes races like the World University Cycling Championship).

Significant coverage is likely to exist for a team if it:

  1. A men's road team in the 1st (UCI WorldTeam), 2nd (UCI ProContinental), or 3rd (UCI Continental) tier;
  2. A UCI team (including UCI women's team, UCI track team, UCI mountain bike team, UCI cyclo-cross team, etc.).

Significant coverage is likely to exist for a race if it:

  1. Is ranked with the UCI (WT, 1HC, 1.1, 1.2, 2HC, 2.1, 2.2, CDM, JO, CM, GT, CC, CN);
  2. Is part of an international multi-sport event (games) (also includes races like the World University Cycling Championship);
  3. Holds significant recognition (for example, Parel van de Veluwe and the People's Choice Classic).

Equestrian sport[edit]

This section does not encompass notability issues for individuals in rodeo, which is addressed at WP:NRODEO, or horse racing, which is covered at WP:NHORSERACING.

Equestrians competing at the highest level of international competition are not always "professionals", some earn money and some do not, but most have sponsors or receive money to support their activities. Both professionals and non-professionals have been put in the professional sports category for convenience.

Significant coverage is likely to exist for individual people and horses who are involved in equestrian sport
  1. Have medaled at the Pan American Games as a rider, driver, or official team coach
  2. Have medaled at the FEI World Equestrian Games (WEG) as a rider, driver, or official team coach
  3. If prior to a competition becoming part of the combined WEG, medaled individually or were on a team that won gold, silver, or bronze at the Eventing World Championship, Show Jumping World Championships, or Dressage World Championship, Combined Driving World Championships, Endurance World Championships or World Vaulting Championships
  4. Have won a FEI World Cup competition.

Significant coverage is also likely to exist for persons or horses associated with equestrian competition who do not meet the criteria outlined above if they are or have been:

  1. A coach or horse trainer who worked with many competitors (human or animal) considered notable by the criteria above, including at least one individual Olympic medalist or World Equestrian Games champion.
  2. Individual inductees into a major equestrian-oriented national hall of fame dedicated to sports with international-level competition, such as the United States Show Jumping Hall of Fame.
  3. Heads of national and international federations, for example, United States Equestrian Federation, Fédération Equestre Internationale.
  4. A horse breeder who was the breeder of record for many notable horses including the mounts of at least one Olympic medal or World Equestrian Games championship competitor.
  5. A horse notable for being a parent or ancestor of a major competitor.
  6. Some but not all winners of national-level championships, particularly those considered the highest honor within a particular discipline or horse breed competition (especially where there is no significant international championship level).
  7. Individuals who made major contributions to the equestrian industry such as veterinarians, researchers, artists, and inventors.

Figure skating[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for figure skating figures if they
  1. Have won a medal at an international senior-level event or the World Junior Figure Skating Championships
  2. Won their country's senior national championships, with the exception of those countries that do not regularly send multiple skaters to the Olympic Games (consult this Olympic athlete tally to check whether the country qualifies).
  3. As coach or choreographer, have worked with many notable skaters, including at least one Olympic medalist or senior World Champion (for example, Pam Gregory and David Wilson)
  4. Have been the heads of national and international federations.
  5. Are members of the World Figure Skating Hall of Fame, or a major national figure skating hall of fame, such as the U.S. Figure Skating Hall of Fame.

Golf[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for golf figures if:

  1. They have competed in the Ryder Cup, Presidents Cup, Solheim Cup, or similar international competition
  2. They are enshrined in one of golf's recognized Halls of Fame (example: World Golf Hall of Fame)
  3. They have won at least one professional golf tournament (examples: PGA Tour, LPGA Tour, European Tour, PGA Tour Champions)
  4. They have won at least one recognized amateur golf tournament at the national or international level (examples: U.S. Amateur, British Amateur)
  5. They have made the cut in one of the four Men's major golf championships, one of the Women's major golf championships (past or present), or one of the Senior major golf championships (past or present)
  6. They have competed as a professional on the PGA, LPGA, European, or Champions Tour for at least one full year

Gymnastics[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for artistic gymnasts if they meet any of the criteria below
  1. Won a senior individual medal at an elite international competition*
  2. Won their country's senior all-around or individual event finals national championship while competing for a country that qualified a full team into the most recent Olympics or senior World Championships
  3. Won an individual medal at the senior national championships for any country that medaled in the team competition at the most recent Olympics or World Championships
  4. Have been inducted into the International Gymnastics Hall of Fame
Significant coverage is likely to exist for junior gymnasts if they meet any of the criteria below
  1. Won an individual gold medal at the junior national championships for any of the following countries: USA, Russia, China, Romania (females only)
  2. Won an individual gold medal, in the junior division, at an elite international competition*
  3. Won an individual medal at the Youth Olympic Games or Junior World Championships
Significant coverage is likely to exist for coaches if they
  1. Have coached many notable athletes, including at least one individual Olympic medalist or world champion
  2. Have been the official head coach of an Olympic or World Championship team
*An elite international competition is
any competition with considerable international WP:GNG coverage between at least eight notable athletes (examples of such competitions include: Pan American Games, Asian Games, Commonwealth Games, European Championships, and Pacific Rim Championships).

Horse racing[edit]

Not all participants in horse racing are athletic "professionals", particularly owners and breeders, but due to purse money and profit motive throughout the sport they are put in the professional sports category for convenience.

Significant coverage is likely to exist for Horse racing figures, including horses and/or their human "connections" (horse trainers, jockeys, or horse owners and horse breeders) if they have accomplished any of the following:

  1. Individuals who win a US Grade I/Group I graded stakes race or the equivalent level in their respective nations. (Horses, due to their relatively short careers, at least once; humans best to have done so more than once)
  2. Individuals who have won multiple significant US Grade/Group 2 or 3 graded stakes races or the equivalent level in their respective nations.
  3. Individuals who have won year-end championship titles, such as an Eclipse Award.
  4. Members of a national Racing Hall of Fame.

Significant coverage is also likely to exist for horses or persons associated with horse racing who were not competitors or do not meet the criteria above, if they meet any of the following:

  1. Individual humans who were significant for new advancements or trailblazing achievements. (examples: Andrew Beyer, Florence Nagle, Diane Crump)
  2. Horses that may not have raced to any significant degree (usually due to injury), but had multiple significant progeny, such as Tapit.
  3. Horses who are ranked the leading sire or broodmare for a given year in their respective nations (again, see Tapit)
  4. Breeding farms or farm owners that do not race many horses themselves, but have produced or currently stand horses who became notable winners. (i.e., Adena Springs)
  5. Agents, race track announcers (e.g., Larry Collmus), racing journalists (e.g., Steve Haskin), venue owners (e.g., Frank Stronach) and other business professionals with a significant connection to horse racing.
  6. Horses and individuals involved in highly publicized thefts or other crimes, e.g., Shergar, scandals, or other nefarious activities, such as substitution scams, e.g., Fine Cotton.
  7. An individual person with a connection to a notable horse is not presumed notable for that reason only, see WP:BIO1E, though if the individual's role is a large one, a significant connection to a single notable horse might justify a spinoff article (e.g., Eddie Sweat, groom of Secretariat). Conversely, a horse is not presumed notable just because the owner is famous – of Jim Rome's racehorses, Shared Belief is notable, Gallatin's Run is probably not.

Ice hockey[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for ice hockey players if they

  1. Achieved preeminent honors (all-time top-10 career scorer, First Team All-Star) in the Mestis, Deutsche Eishockey Liga, Slovak Extraliga, HockeyAllsvenskan, National League, or American Hockey League;
  2. Achieved preeminent honors (all-time top-10 career scorer or First Team All-Star) in the Eishockey Liga, Belarusian Extraleague, DEL2, GET-ligaen, ECHL, Elite Ice Hockey League, Ontario Hockey League, Quebec Major Junior Hockey League, Western Hockey League, Elite.A, or Beneliga;
  3. Achieved preeminent honors (all-time top-10 career scorer or First or Second Team All-American) in the men's play versions of the Atlantic Hockey, Big Ten Conference, Central Collegiate Hockey Association, ECAC Hockey, Hockey East, National Collegiate Hockey Conference, or NCAA Division I independent;
  4. Are a first-round draft pick of the NHL Entry Draft; or
  5. Played on a senior national team for the World Championship, in the highest pool the IIHF maintained in any given year (Note: playing in lower pools that do not actually contest for the World Champion title is not enough to satisfy inclusion requirements).

For coaches or managers of ice hockey teams, substitute "coached" or "managed" for "played" in the player guidelines.

For participants in defunct leagues who satisfy any of these achievement standards, please see the ice hockey league assessment maintained by the Ice Hockey WikiProject. For leagues still in existence, only those listed above satisfy the specified criteria.

Kickboxing[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for a kickboxing athlete if they:

  • Have been ranked in the world top-10 by a major, preferably two, independent publication that meets the definition of a reliable source, or
  • Have been a Lumpinee or Rajadamnern champion.

Kickboxers that have an amateur background exclusively are not notable unless the person has been the subject examined in detail (more than a single paragraph) in several reliable third-party sources (at least four), excluding local publications.

Mixed martial arts[edit]

  1. Have been ranked in the world top 10 in their division by either Sherdog (sherdog.com) or Fight Matrix (fightmatrix.com).

Motorsports[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for motorsport figures if they
  1. A driver or rider who has qualified for any of the following events:
  2. A driver or rider who has competed for at least one full season in any of the following series:
  3. A driver or rider who has finished on the overall podium of any of the following events:
  4. A driver, rider, or co-driver who has won any of the following events overall:
  5. A driver or rider who has won any of the following championship titles:
    • The overall championship title of any series in the previous category without winning a race (a relatively common occurrence in series whose points-scoring systems favour consistent finishes over inconsistent victories).
    • A major championship in which a large number of the competitors are amateur "gentleman" drivers or privateers, such as the European Le Mans Series, Intercontinental GT Challenge, or European Rally Championship.
  6. Any driver who does not meet the previous criteria who has received an FIA platinum driver categorisation. Significant coverage is likely to exist for Drivers who have received an FIA gold driver categorisation, although a minority of drivers in this group may not meet the general notability guideline.
  7. A current or former owner or team principal for a team in a major racing series (Formula One, the World Rally Championship, MotoGP, Formula E, Indycar, DTM, Super GT, the NASCAR Cup Series, V8 Supercars, CART, or top-level IMSA) for a full season or more. This includes Cup Series crew chiefs.
  8. Enshrined in any notable motorsports hall of fame.
  9. A current or former holder of significant motorsports record, such as a land speed record.

Orienteering[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for an athlete who competes in the field of orienteering if they meet any of the criteria below
  1. Have finished top 3 in the World Orienteering Championships, the European Orienteering Championships, the overall Orienteering World Cup at the end of a season or the World Games.
Significant coverage is likely to exist for an orienteering club if it meets any of the criteria below
  1. Has won a major relay (according to the criteria below, which mean presently Tiomila (both the Tiomila relay and the women’s relay, since 1970 when the number of team became so large that it could not anymore be organized from point A to point B) and the Jukola relay (both Jukola, from 1972, and Venla).
  2. Has been represented by ten runners who fulfill the criteria above.
Significant coverage is likely to exist for an event apart from the championships mentioned above if it meet all the following criteria
  1. It has an international elite field.
  2. It regularly has more than 5,000 competitors.
  3. It has been held over a period of 25 years.

Presently that means O-Ringen, Tiomila, and the Jukola relay. In addition, an event is also likely to receive significant coverage if it is a competition for developing elite athletes; this includes the Junior World Orienteering Championships, the World University Orienteering Championships and the European Youth Orienteering Championships.

Rodeo[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for individuals who participate in the sport of rodeo if they
  1. Have been inducted into a national or international rodeo hall of fame such as the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, Canadian Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum Rodeo Hall of Fame, National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame, or Bull Riding Hall of Fame.
  2. College rodeo athletes in NIRA competition will follow NCOLLATH and younger rodeo competitors will follow NHSPHSATH.
  3. Significant coverage is likely to exist for named animals participating in rodeo, such as bucking horses and bucking bulls, if they have been named to a rodeo hall of fame such as those noted above.

Rugby league[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for a player or coach of rugby league football if they:

  1. Have appeared in at least one match at a Rugby League World Cup tournament, Rugby League Four Nations tournament, Pacific Cup or Rugby League European Cup, or
  2. Have appeared in at least one match between Great Britain, England, Wales, France, New Zealand, or Australia prior to 1995, or
  3. Have appeared in at least one match of a fully professional club rugby league competition:

Other players and personalities in the game are notable if they meet WP:NBASIC.

Note 1: or their earlier iterations in the UK, Australia or New Zealand.

Rugby union[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for a rugby union person if they have played for, coached, or administered:

  1. A "High Performance Union" at any time(see Note 1) or another test nation during an appearance at the men's Rugby World Cup(see Note 2) or,
  2. A team in a notable fully professional rugby union competition since 1995 or,
  3. A team in the Rugby World Cup Sevens, World Rugby Sevens Series, Commonwealth Games, or
  4. A women's national team in at least the semi-finals of the Women's Rugby World Cup.(see Note 3)

Note 1: "High Performance Unions" for men are: Argentina, Australia, British and Irish Lions, Canada, England, Fiji, France, Georgia (at Rugby World Cups 2003, 2017, 2011 and 2015 and from 2016–present), Ireland, Italy, Japan, Namibia (at Rugby World Cups 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011 and 2015 and from 2016–present), New Zealand, Romania, Samoa, Scotland, South Africa, Tonga, United States, Uruguay (at Rugby World Cups 1999, 2003 and 2015 and from 2016–present) and Wales.[8] Women do not have this criterion.
Note 2: Non-High Performance Unions nations that have appeared at the World cup are: Ivory Coast (1995), Portugal (2007), Spain (1999), Russia (2011 and 2019) and Zimbabwe (1987 and 1991)
Note 3: Nations that have played at the Women's World cup at the semi-final level are: Australia (2010), Canada (1998, 2002, 2006 and 2014), England (1991, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2017), France (1991, 1994, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2017), Ireland (2014), New Zealand (1991, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010 and 2017), United States (1991, 1994, 1998 and 2017), and Wales (1994).

The above parameters apply to all rugby union persons regardless of professional or amateur status. A player who signs for a team in a fully professional rugby competition but has not played in any games is not deemed to have participated in a competition, and is therefore not generally regarded as being notable under these criteria. Youth players are not notable unless they satisfy one of the statements above, or if they can be shown to meet the wider requirements of WP:NBASIC.

Sumo[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for sumo wrestlers if theyhave been ranked in either the top (makuuchi) division or second-highest (juryo) division. Significant coverage is not likely to exist for wrestlers who have only appeared in lower divisions, as they have not reached fully professional status.

Tennis[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for tennis figures if they
  1. Are a member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame, either in the contributor or player category
  2. Have competed in the main draw in one of the highest-level professional tournaments:
  3. Have won at least one title in any of the ATP Challenger tournaments.
  4. Have won at least one title in any of the ITF Women's $50,000–$100,000+ tournaments, or any of the WTA 125 tournaments. (Until 2007 it was $25,000 tournament based on the lowest payout for a men's challenger tournament in the same year).
  5. Hold a tennis record recognized by the International Tennis Federation, ATP, or WTA.

Significant coverage is likely to exist for junior players if they have won at least a junior Grand Slam title, have been in the top-3 of the junior ITF world rankings, or can be shown to meet the wider requirements of WP:NBASIC.

This guideline applies equally to singles and doubles players.

Triathlon[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for triathletes if they
  1. Have had a podium finish at the Commonwealth Games.
  2. Have had a top-ten finish in the final World Triathlon Series standings (or in the final World Triathlon Cup standings, prior to 2009).
  3. Have had a top-ten finish in an World Triathlon sanctioned championship event.
  4. Have an elite level podium finish at an World Triathlon Continental Championship.
  5. Have had a professional division top-ten finish at the Ironman World Championship or at the Ironman 70.3 World Championship.
  6. Have had a podium finish at the XTERRA Triathlon championships.
  7. Have won an event that has a starting pro/elite field of at least 15 male or 10 female competitors.
  8. Have set a record for a standard distance event or leg.

Amateur sports persons[edit]

College athletes and coaches[edit]

College athletes and coaches are notable if they have been the subject of non-trivial media coverage beyond merely a repeating of their statistics, mentions in game summaries, or other WP:ROUTINE coverage. Examples would include head coaches, well-known assistant coaches, or players who:

  1. Have won a national award (such as those listed in Template:College Football Awards or the equivalent in another sport), or established a major NCAA Division I record.
  2. Were inducted into the hall of fame in their sport (for example, the College Football Hall of Fame).
  3. Gained national media attention as an individual, not just as a player for a notable team. Very rarely, a player may gain national media attention despite not being on a notable team, such as Lauren Hill.
  4. Have won multiple NCAA Division I national championships as an individual in an individual sport.
  5. Served as a full-time (as opposed to interim) head coach for NCAA Division I/University Division football (since the establishment of divisions in 1957), men’s basketball (since 1957) or women’s basketball (since 1982). Other college coaches in other divisions and/or other sports may also meet notability guidelines via WP:NBASIC.

Gaelic games[edit]

Significant coverage is likely to exist for GAA figures if that figure is or has been a:

  1. Gaelic footballer who has played in the National League or at senior inter-county level in the Championship
  2. Gaelic handballer who has won at senior inter-county level
  3. Hurler who has played in the National League or at senior inter-county level in the Championship

High school and pre-high school athletes[edit]

High school and pre-high school athletes are notable only if they have received, as individuals, substantial and prolonged coverage that is: (1) independent of the subject; and (2) clearly goes beyond WP:ROUTINE coverage. The first clause excludes all school papers and school websites that cover their sports teams and other teams they compete against. The second clause excludes the majority of local coverage in both news sources and sports specific publications. It especially excludes using game play summaries, statistical results, or routine interviews as sources to establish notability.

Organizations, venues and games notability[edit]

Teams and clubs[edit]

This guideline does not provide any general criteria for the presumed notability of sports teams and clubs. Some sports have specific criteria. Otherwise, teams and clubs are expected to demonstrate notability by the general notability guideline.

Since notability is not inherited, the notability of an athlete does not imply the notability of a team or club, or vice versa.

Olympic and Paralympic Games[edit]

For details on suggested content for the above article types see Wikipedia:WikiProject Olympics/Manual of Style.

Individual seasons[edit]

Individual season articles for top-level professional teams are highly likely to meet Wikipedia notability requirements. If the article is not for a top level professional team (such as for a college team) weigh both the season itself and the sport (for example, if a US college or university's football and fencing teams enjoy the same level of success, the football team is likely to receive a significantly greater amount of coverage):

  • A national championship season at the top collegiate level is generally notable.
  • A national championship season at a lower collegiate level might be notable
  • A season including a post-season appearance (or, if there is no post-season competition, a high final ranking) in the top collegiate level is often notable.
  • For programs considered elite in a sport (for example, Kentucky, North Carolina, Kansas, in men's basketball; Tennessee and UConn in women's basketball; Michigan, Notre Dame, Alabama, USC in football, etc.) many or all seasons might be notable regardless of the outcome (the amount written by reliable sources on a weekly basis for some of these programs is enough that almost anything or anyone having any relation to them is likely to meet the General Notability Guideline).
  • In cases in which the individual season notability is insufficient for an article, multiple seasons may be grouped together in a single article. This grouping might be based on head coaches, conference affiliation, or any other reasonable standard that results in sufficient coverage for the period to warrant an article.

Individual games or series[edit]

Regular season games in professional and college leagues are not presumed notable. To be notable, games should be extraordinary and have a lasting impact on the sport; news coverage should be extensive (e.g., outside of the week of its occurrence and in non-local newspapers).

Some games or series are likely or almost certain to be considered notable, including but not limited to the following:

Articles about notable games should have well-sourced prose, not merely a list of stats.

For a games or series that is already covered as a subtopic in another article, consider developing the topic in the existing article first until it becomes clear that a standalone article is warranted. Although a game or series may be notable, it may sometimes be better to present the topic in an existing article on a broader topic instead of creating a new standalone page.

Rivalries[edit]

Sports rivalries are not presumed notable. Articles on sports rivalries, such as Yankees–Red Sox rivalry, should satisfy the general notability guideline.

Arenas, stadia and other athletic venues[edit]

As with teams and clubs (see WP:NTEAM), sporting arenas, stadia and other venues do not have presumed notability, and are expected to demonstrate notability through meeting the general notability guideline. Since notability is not inherited, neither the notability of a sports team nor of competitions played there imply the notability of a venue.

Research links[edit]

The following are some potential places to look for sources to establish sports notability:

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Statement to exclude Esports from this guideline" discussion, October–November 2011
  2. ^ This includes both those which were never listed, and those which were but have since been removed, most recently following an RfC from January–March 2022.
  3. ^ What constitutes a "published work" is deliberately broad.
  4. ^ Non-triviality is a measure of the depth of content of a published work, and how far removed that content is from a simple directory entry or a mention in passing that does not discuss the subject in detail. A credible 200-page independent biography of a person that covers that person's life in detail is non-trivial, whereas a birth certificate or a 1-line listing on an election ballot form is not. Database sources such as Notable Names Database, Internet Movie Database, and Internet Adult Film Database are not considered credible since they are, like wikis, mass-edited with little oversight. Additionally, these databases have low, wide-sweeping generic standards of inclusion.
  5. ^ Sources that are pure derivatives of an original source can be used as references, but do not contribute toward establishing the notability of a subject. "Intellectual independence" requires not only that the content of sources be non-identical, but also that the entirety of content in a published work not derived from (or based in) another work (partial derivations are acceptable). For example, a speech by a politician about a particular person contributes toward establishing the notability of that person, but multiple reproductions of the transcript of that speech by different news outlets do not. A biography written about a person contributes toward establishing their notability, but a summary of that biography lacking an original intellectual contribution does not.
  6. ^ Autobiography and self-promotion are not routes to having an encyclopaedia article. The barometer of notability is whether people independent of the subject itself have actually considered the subject notable enough that they have written and published non-trivial works that focus upon it. Thus, entries in biographical dictionaries that accept self-nominations (such as the Marquis Who's Who) do not prove notability.
  7. ^ Articles that are not sourced to published material providing significant coverage of the subject (beyond just statistics sites) may be nominated for deletion.
  8. ^ World Rugby (2017). "Current High Performance Investment Unions". High Performance Playbook 2016–2020 (PDF). World Rugby. p. 8.