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These featured pictures, as scheduled below, appeared as the picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page in the last 30 days.

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


December 7

Cape starling

The Cape starling (Lamprotornis nitens) is a medium-sized passerine bird in the starling family, Sturnidae, found in southern Africa. It is a gregarious bird and forms large flocks outside the breeding season. It usually feeds on the ground, often foraging alongside other species of starlings. Habituated to humans, its diet includes fruit, insects and nectar. It sometimes feeds on ectoparasites that it picks off the backs of animals or visits bird tables for scraps. This Cape starling, of the subspecies L. n. phoenicopterus, was photographed in Damaraland, Namibia.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


December 6

Quo Vadis

Quo Vadis is an Italian silent film directed by Enrico Guazzoni for Cines in 1913, based on the 1896 novel of the same name written by Henryk Sienkiewicz. It was one of the first blockbusters in the history of cinema. This poster for Quo Vadis, produced for George Kleine, the U.S. distributor of the film, depicts the Roman emperor Nero playing a lyre while Rome burns in the background, with the caption "Nero sings while Rome burns".

Poster credit: National Printing & Engraving Company; restored by Adam Cuerden


December 5

James Guthrie

James Guthrie (December 5, 1792 – March 13, 1869) was a Kentucky lawyer, plantation owner, railroad president and Democratic Party politician. His financial acumen was recognized by President Franklin Pierce who appointed him Secretary of the Treasury in 1853. He strongly opposed proposals for Kentucky to secede from the United States and attended the Peace Conference of 1861, siding with the Union during the Civil War. This picture is a line engraving of Guthrie, produced around 1902 by the Department of the Treasury's Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP), as part of a BEP presentation album of the first 42 secretaries of the treasury.

Engraving credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


December 4

Malagasy giant chameleon

The Malagasy giant chameleon or Oustalet's chameleon is a large species of chameleon endemic to Madagascar. This male, photographed in the Anja Community Reserve, is catching a grasshopper by projecting its long tongue at tremendous speed to capture prey located some distance away.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


December 3

1771 Russian one-ruble coin

The ruble is the name of a currency unit in a number of countries in eastern Europe. This one-ruble coin was issued by the Russian Empire in 1771, during the reign of Catherine the Great. It is made of solid copper, weighing just over 1.022 kg (2.25 lb), and was designed to be kept in the imperial treasury as metallic backing for the country's paper-ruble issue. Marginally larger than a standard hockey puck, it is reportedly the largest copper coin ever issued. The coin now forms part of the National Numismatic Collection at the National Museum of American History.

Coin design credit: Russian Empire; photographed by the National Numismatic Collection


December 2

Seal of Indiana

This historical coat of arms of Indiana is an illustration from State Arms of the Union by Henry Mitchell, published by Louis Prang in 1876. The sun rising over the Allegheny Mountains suggests that Indiana has a bright future. The woodsman represents civilization subduing the wilderness, while the American bison represents the wilderness fleeing westward away from the advance of civilization. This design is also used on the state seal, introduced in 1816, the year in which Indiana became a U.S. state.

Illustration credit: Henry Mitchell; restored by Andrew Shiva


December 1

Northern royal albatross

The northern royal albatross (Diomedea sanfordi) is a large seabird in the albatross family, Diomedeidae. It nests only on the Chatham Islands, on Enderby Island, and at Taiaroa Head on the Otago Peninsula of New Zealand. It spends the rest of the year away from land, in circumpolar flights over the Southern Ocean, feeding on squid, fish, crustaceans, salps and carrion. The species is listed on the IUCN Red List as endangered, but predators have been eliminated from the islands where it breeds, and conservation efforts have proved successful at the Taiaroa Head colony. This northern royal albatross was photographed off the southeastern coast of Tasmania, Australia.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


November 30

Henry Taube

Henry Taube (November 30, 1915 – November 16, 2005) was a Canadian-born American chemist who was awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for "his work in the mechanisms of electron-transfer reactions, especially in metal complexes". He was the second Canadian-born chemist to win the Nobel Prize, and remains the only Saskatchewanian-born Nobel laureate. Taube also received many other major scientific awards, including the Priestley Medal in 1985 and two Guggenheim Fellowships early in his career (1949 and 1955), as well as numerous honorary doctorates.

Photograph credit: United States Department of Energy; restored by Bammesk


November 29

Walchensee Hydroelectric Power Station

The Walchensee Hydroelectric Power Station is a storage power station in Bavaria, Germany. The turbines, seen here, are fed by water from the Walchensee which is then released into the Kochelsee. The power station uses the hydraulic head of about 200 metres (660 ft) between the two natural lakes, and water from the Rißbach river is also used to augment the supply. The installed capacity is 124 MW with an annual production of 300 GWh; this is one of the largest of such power plants in Germany.

Photograph credit: Diego Delso


November 28

A Meeting in the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters

A Meeting in the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters is a monumental 1897 oil-on-canvas group portrait by Peder Severin Krøyer, depicting the membership of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters during one of its meetings in the Prince's Mansion in Copenhagen. Commissioned by the Carlsberg Foundation, the painting measures 266.7 by 519.4 centimetres (105.0 in × 204.5 in), and hangs in the Academy's building in central Copenhagen.

Painting credit: Peder Severin Krøyer


November 27

Cygnus

Cygnus is a northern constellation on the plane of the Milky Way, deriving its name from the Latinized Greek word for 'swan'. Cygnus is one of the most recognizable constellations of the northern summer and autumn, and it features a prominent asterism known as the Northern Cross. Cygnus was among the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy, and it remains one of the 88 modern constellations. This illustration of Cygnus, with the surrounding constellations of Lacerta, Lyra and Vulpecula, was produced around 1823 as part of Urania's Mirror, a set of 32 astronomical star-chart cards published in the United Kingdom.

Lithograph credit: Sidney Hall; restored by Adam Cuerden


November 26

Purana tigrina

Purana tigrina is a species of cicada found in Southeast Asia. This adult male was photographed in Kadavoor, Kerala, in southern India, and is about one inch (25 mm) in length. The mouthparts are adapted to piercing plant tissues and sucking sap; the male abdomen houses the tymbal, an organ used in the production of song, while the female abdomen is tipped by a large, saw-edged ovipositor.

Photograph credit: Jeevan Jose


November 25

Subpage 1

Early American currency

Early American currency went through several stages of development during the colonial and post-Revolutionary history of the United States. During the American Revolution, the Colonies became independent states. No longer subject to arbitrarily imposed monetary regulations by the British Parliament, the States began to issue paper money, to pay for military expenses. This forty shillings banknote was issued by the Colony of Connecticut, dated 2 January 1775; it is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: Colony of Connecticut and Timothy Green (printer); photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 2

Early American currency

Early American currency went through several stages of development during the colonial and post-Revolutionary history of the United States. During the American Revolution, the Colonies became independent states. No longer subject to arbitrarily imposed monetary regulations by the British Parliament, the States began to issue paper money, to pay for military expenses. This four shillings banknote was issued by the Delaware Colony and is dated 1 January 1776; it is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: Delaware Colony and James Adams (printer); photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 3

Early American currency

Early American currency went through several stages of development during the colonial and post-Revolutionary history of the United States. During the American Revolution, the Colonies became independent states. No longer subject to arbitrarily imposed monetary regulations by the British Parliament, the States began to issue paper money, to pay for military expenses. This forty dollar banknote was issued by the state of Georgia and is dated 4 May 1778; it is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: State of Georgia and W. Lancaster (printer); photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 4

Early American currency

Early American currency went through several stages of development during the colonial and post-Revolutionary history of the United States. During the American Revolution, the Colonies became independent states. No longer subject to arbitrarily imposed monetary regulations by the British Parliament, the States began to issue paper money, to pay for military expenses. This one dollar banknote was issued by the Province of Maryland and is dated 1 March 1770; it is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: Province of Maryland and Anne Catherine & William Green (printers); photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 5

Early American currency

Early American currency went through several stages of development during the colonial and post-Revolutionary history of the United States. During the American Revolution, the Colonies became independent states. No longer subject to arbitrarily imposed monetary regulations by the British Parliament, the States began to issue paper money, to pay for military expenses. This two shillings banknote was issued by the Province of Massachusetts Bay and is dated 1 May 1741; it is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: Province of Massachusetts Bay; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 6

Early American currency

Early American currency went through several stages of development during the colonial and post-Revolutionary history of the United States. During the American Revolution, the Colonies became independent states. No longer subject to arbitrarily imposed monetary regulations by the British Parliament, the States began to issue paper money, to pay for military expenses. This one dollar banknote was issued by the state of New Hampshire and is dated 29 April 1780; it is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: Province of New Hampshire, printed by Hall & Sellers; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 7

Early American currency

Early American currency went through several stages of development during the colonial and post-Revolutionary history of the United States. During the American Revolution, the Colonies became independent states. No longer subject to arbitrarily imposed monetary regulations by the British Parliament, the States began to issue paper money, to pay for military expenses. This twelve shillings banknote was issued by the Colony of New-Jersey and is dated 25 March 1776; it is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: Colony of New Jersey and I. Collins (printer); photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 8

Early American currency

Early American currency went through several stages of development during the colonial and post-Revolutionary history of the United States. During the American Revolution, the Colonies became independent states. No longer subject to arbitrarily imposed monetary regulations by the British Parliament, the States began to issue paper money, to pay for military expenses. This two shillings banknote was issued by the Colony of New-York and is dated 2 August 1775; it is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: Colony of New York and H. Gaine (printer); photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 9

Early American currency

Early American currency went through several stages of development during the colonial and post-Revolutionary history of the United States. During the American Revolution, the Colonies became independent states. No longer subject to arbitrarily imposed monetary regulations by the British Parliament, the States began to issue paper money, to pay for military expenses. This three pounds banknote was issued by the Province of North Carolina, dated 27 November 1729; it is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: Province of North Carolina; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 10

Early American currency

Early American currency went through several stages of development during the colonial and post-Revolutionary history of the United States. During the American Revolution, the Colonies became independent states. No longer subject to arbitrarily imposed monetary regulations by the British Parliament, the States began to issue paper money, to pay for military expenses. This twenty shillings banknote was issued by the Province of Pennsylvania, dated 20 March 1771; it is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: Province of Pennsylvania, Printed by D. Hall & W. Sellers; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 11

Early American currency

Early American currency went through several stages of development during the colonial and post-Revolutionary history of the United States. During the American Revolution, the Colonies became independent states. No longer subject to arbitrarily imposed monetary regulations by the British Parliament, the States began to issue paper money, to pay for military expenses. This one dollar banknote was issued by the State of Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations, dated 2 July 1780; it is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Printed by D. Hall & W. Sellers; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 12

Early American currency

Early American currency went through several stages of development during the colonial and post-revolutionary history of the United States. During the American Revolution, the colonies became independent states. No longer subject to arbitrarily imposed monetary regulations by the British Parliament, the states began to issue paper money, to pay for military expenses. This sixty dollars banknote was issued by the state of South Carolina, dated 8 February 1779; it is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: South Carolina, engraved by Thomas Coram; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 13

Early American currency

Early American currency went through several stages of development during the colonial and post-revolutionary history of the United States. During the American Revolution, the colonies became independent states. No longer subject to arbitrarily imposed monetary regulations by the British Parliament, the states began to issue paper money, to pay for military expenses. This three pounds banknote was issued by the Colony of Virginia, dated 4 March 1773; it is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: Colony of Virginia, engraved by Henry Ashby; photographed by Andrew Shiva


November 24

Eswatini

Eswatini, formerly known as Swaziland, is a landlocked country in Southern Africa. The government is an absolute monarchy, the last of its kind in Africa, and the country has been ruled by King Mswati III since 1986. One of the country's important cultural events is Umhlanga, the reed-dance festival, held in August or September each year. This photograph shows Princess Sikhanyiso Dlamini, the eldest daughter of Mswati III, at the 2006 festival.

Photograph credit: Amada44


November 23

Northern palm squirrel

The northern palm squirrel (Funambulus pennantii) is a species of rodent in the family Sciuridae. It has a wide distribution in the Indian subcontinent and Iran, being a semi-arboreal species found in dry deciduous forest and many other rural and urban habitats. It is a common species with a wide range and the International Union for Conservation of Nature has rated its conservation status as being of least concern. This northern palm squirrel was photographed in Keoladeo National Park in Bharatpur, in the Indian state of Rajasthan.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


November 22

Baby Huwae

Baby Huwae (22 November 1939 – 5 June 1989) was an Indonesian model, film actress and singer. Born in Rotterdam, Netherlands, she moved to Indonesia, where she took up modelling, by the 1950s. She entered the film industry in 1958, and gained popularity following the success of Asrama Dara. Over the next few years, Huwae acted in a further five films and established a girl group, the Baby Dolls, with several actresses who had appeared in her second film. She made a guest appearance in one more film in 1971 after a ten-year hiatus.

Photograph credit: Tati Photo Studio; restored by Chris Woodrich


November 21

Sainte-Chapelle de Vincennes

The Sainte-Chapelle de Vincennes is a Gothic royal chapel within the fortifications of the Château de Vincennes on the east edge of Paris. It was inspired by the Sainte-Chapelle, the royal chapel within the Palais de la Cité in Paris. It was begun in 1379 by Charles V of France to house relics of the Passion of Jesus. The interior, seen in this photograph, has very little decoration, most of it having been destroyed in 1793 during the French Revolution, but vestiges of the sculpture and portions of the Renaissance stained glass remain.

Photograph credit: Daniel Vorndran


November 20

Ruddy turnstone

The ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres) is a small wading bird in the sandpiper family, Scolopacidae. It is a highly migratory bird, breeding in northern parts of Eurasia and North America and flying south to winter on coastlines almost worldwide. This adult ruddy turnstone in non-breeding plumage was photographed at Boat Harbour in New South Wales, Australia.

Photograph credit: John Harrison

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November 19

Alan Bean

Alan Bean (1932–2018) was an American naval officer, naval aviator, aeronautical engineer, test pilot, and NASA astronaut. During the Apollo 12 mission, on 19–20 November 1969, he became the fourth person to walk on the Moon. This portrait photograph, taken by NASA two months before the mission, depicts Bean beside a mock-up of the Apollo Lunar Module, wearing his space suit without the helmet and gloves.

Photograph credit: NASA / Johnson Space Center

Recently featured:

November 18

Utah monolith

The Utah monolith was a three-meter-tall (9.8 ft) metal pillar that stood in a red sandstone slot canyon in northern San Juan County in the U.S. state of Utah. Made of metal sheets riveted into a triangular prism, it was unlawfully placed on public land between July and October 2016, and stood unnoticed for more than four years until its discovery and removal in late 2020. The identity of its makers, and their objectives, are unknown. Following its discovery, numerous similar metal columns, many of which were built by local artists as deliberate imitations, were erected in other places throughout the world. This photograph shows the Utah monolith at its original location.

Photograph credit: Patrick A. Mackie; retouched by Chainwit.


November 17

Georg Braun

Georg Braun (1541 – 10 March 1622) was a Catholic cleric and topo-geographer from Cologne. From 1572 to 1617, he edited the Civitates orbis terrarum, which contains 546 prospects, bird's-eye views and maps of cities from around the world. This copper plate print was published in the first volume of the work; it was engraved by the Flemish mapmaker Frans Hogenberg and shows a historical view of Trier.

Credit: Frans Hogenberg and Georg Braun


November 16

Cheetah

The cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) is a large cat native to Africa and central Iran. Cubs are highly vulnerable to predators during the first few weeks of life, and predation is the leading cause of mortality among cheetah cubs. A study showed that in areas with a low density of predators (such as Namibian farmlands) around 70 per cent of the cubs survived beyond the age of 14 months, whereas in areas like the Serengeti National Park, where several large carnivores exist, the survival rate was just 17 per cent. This cheetah cub was photographed in the Phinda Private Game Reserve in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, amid long grass.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


November 15

Capitolium of Brixia

The Capitolium of Brixia was the main temple in the center of the Roman town of Brixia (Brescia) in northern Italy. All that remains is fragmentary ruins, but the temple is part of an archeological site, including a Roman amphitheatre and museum in central Brescia. It forms part of the Longobards in Italy: Places of Power (568–774 A.D.), a UNESCO World Heritage Site inscribed in 2011.

Photograph credit: Wolfgang Moroder


November 14

La Esmeralda

La Esmeralda is a grand opera in four acts composed by Louise Bertin, an adaptation of the French Gothic novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame by Victor Hugo, who also wrote the libretto for the opera. This sketch by Charles-Antoine Cambon shows the set design for act 3, scene 2, of the opera, which premiered at the Théâtre de l'Académie Royale de Musique in Paris on 14 November 1836.

Set design credit: Charles-Antoine Cambon; restored by Adam Cuerden


November 13

John A. Dahlgren

John A. Dahlgren (November 13, 1809 – July 12, 1870) was a United States Navy officer who founded the Navy's Ordnance Department and launched major advances in gunnery. He introduced a cast-iron muzzle-loading cannon with vastly increased range and accuracy, known as the Dahlgren gun, which became the Navy's standard armament. During the American Civil War, he was made the commander of the Washington Navy Yard. He also served at sea, being put in command of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron.

Photograph credit: Mathew Brady; restored by Jebulon


November 12

Saddle-billed stork

The saddle-billed stork (Ephippiorhynchus senegalensis) is a large wading bird in the stork family, Ciconiidae. The species has a widespread distribution in sub-Saharan Africa, and feeds on fish, frogs, crabs and other small creatures. This saddle-billed stork was photographed fishing in the shallow waters of the Okavango Delta in Botswana.

Photograph credit: Diego Delso


November 11

Nelly Martyl

Nelly Martyl (1884–1953) was a French opera singer. She sang in the premieres of several operas, including Leborne's La Catalane (1907), Erlanger's La Sorcière (1912), and Massenet's Amadis (1922). Martyl joined the Red Cross as a nurse during the First World War, and served at the Battle of Verdun in 1916, where she was known as la fée de Verdun (the Fairy of Verdun), and at the Second Battle of the Aisne in 1917. She continued as a nurse after the war to help with the 1918 epidemic of Spanish flu. She was awarded the Croix de Guerre with the carte du combattant (signifying service under particular hazard) in 1920.

Photograph credit: Jean Reutlinger; restored by Adam Cuerden


November 10

Landscape near Arles

Landscape near Arles is an 1888 oil-on-canvas by the French artist Paul Gauguin. It depicts a rural scene in Provence, southern France, featuring a haystack with a traditional farmhouse and cypress trees in the background. At the time, Gauguin was living with Vincent van Gogh in Arles; they had a stormy relationship, but it proved to be a productive period for both artists. The painting is in the collection of the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Painting credit: Paul Gauguin


November 9

Fredrikke Mørck

Fredrikke Mørck (9 November 1861 – 14 October 1934) was a Norwegian feminist, editor and school teacher. Born in Trondheim, she started her own school, Fredrikke Mørcks Pigeskole, around 1905. She contributed to the feminist magazine Nylænde from its inception in 1893, and served as its editor from 1916 to 1927. Mørck chaired the Norwegian Association for Women's Rights from 1926 to 1930.

Photograph credit: unknown; restored by Adam Cuerden


November 8

Cortina d'Ampezzo

Cortina d'Ampezzo is a town in the heart of the southern (Dolomitic) Alps in the region of Veneto in northern Italy. Situated on the river Boite, in an alpine valley, it is a summer and winter sports resort. Seen here in late summer from Mount Faloria with the peaks of Tofane in the background, Cortina d'Ampezzo hosted the 1956 Winter Olympics and the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2021, and, jointly with Milan, is scheduled to host the 2026 Winter Olympics and the 2026 Winter Paralympics.

Photograph credit: Kallerna


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