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These featured pictures, as scheduled below, appeared as the picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page in the last 30 days.

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


May 6

Xbox

The Xbox is a home video game console and the first installment in the Xbox series of video game consoles manufactured by Microsoft. Classified as a sixth-generation console, it was released as Microsoft's first foray into the gaming console market in 2001 in North America, followed by Australia, Europe and Japan in 2002, and was succeeded in 2005 by the Xbox 360. The console is shown here with the S controller, which replaced the console's original as the standard pack-in game controller. The Xbox console is notable for having a built-in hard drive, breakaway controller dongles, and an Ethernet port to support Microsoft's online gaming service, Xbox Live.

Photograph credit: Evan Amos

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May 5

Sun

The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System. It is a nearly perfect sphere of hot plasma, heated to incandescence by nuclear-fusion reactions in its core, radiating the energy mainly as visible light and infrared radiation. It is by far the most important source of energy for life on Earth. Its diameter is about 1.39 million kilometres (860,000 mi), or 109 times that of Earth. Its mass is about 330,000 times that of Earth, and accounts for about 99.86 percent of the total mass of the Solar System. Roughly three-quarters of the Sun's mass consists of hydrogen; the rest is mostly helium, with much smaller quantities of heavier elements, including oxygen, carbon, neon, and iron. This diagram illustrates the general structure of the Sun, with all features drawn to scale.

Diagram credit: Kelvin Ma


May 4

William Tell

William Tell (Guillaume Tell) is a French-language opera in four acts by the Italian composer Gioachino Rossini, first performed in 1829. This watercolour illustration shows costume designs by Eugène Du Faget for three characters for the opera's premiere: from left to right, Laure Cinti-Damoreau as Mathilde, Adolphe Nourrit as Arnold Melchtal, and Nicolas Levasseur as Walter Furst. The picture had previously been cut up into three separate images (one for each character), and has here been restored.

Painting credit: Eugène Du Faget; restored by Adam Cuerden


May 3

Smolny Institute

The Smolny Institute is a Palladian edifice in Saint Petersburg that has played a major part in the history of Russia. This photograph depicts the building's facade in 2016, with a statue of Vladimir Lenin in the foreground.

Photograph credit: Andrew Shiva


May 2

Self-Portrait at the age of 34

Self-Portrait at the age of 34 is a 1640 oil painting by the Dutch painter Rembrandt, one of several self-portraits showing the artist in a fancy costume from the previous century. The pose is similar to Titian's work, A Man with a Quilted Sleeve, which Rembrandt is known to have studied. The painting is in the collection of the National Gallery in London.

Painting credit: Rembrandt


May 1

Fred Rogers (1928–2003) was an American television host, author, producer, and Presbyterian minister. He was the creator, showrunner, and host of the preschool television series Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, which ran from 1968 to 2001. He is seen here testifying before the Senate Subcommittee on Communications, chaired by John Pastore, on May 1, 1969, advocating for greater funding for the proposed Public Broadcasting Service.

Video credit: United States Senate


April 30

Agile frog

The agile frog (Rana dalmatina) is a species of true frog in the family Ranidae. Native to central and southern Europe, its brownish dappled colouring helps to conceal it among the leaf litter on the forest floor. This frog, about 5 cm (2.0 in) long, was photographed in the Golovec Forest in Slovenia.

Photograph credit: Petar Milošević


April 29

Amalia de Llano

Amalia de Llano (April 29, 1822 – July 6, 1874) was a Spanish countess and writer. This 1853 oil-on-canvas portrait by Federico de Madrazo y Kuntz shows her seated in a fine armchair wearing sumptuous clothes, with her youth and beauty accentuated by the dark background, and is quite unlike a traditional Spanish portrait of the period.

Painting credit: Federico de Madrazo y Kuntz


April 28

Civic Center, San Francisco

The Civic Center in San Francisco, California, is an area located a few blocks north of the intersection of Market Street and Van Ness Avenue that contains many of the city's largest government and cultural institutions. It has two large plazas and a number of buildings in classical architectural style. This 2016 panoramic photograph of the Civic Center at dusk was taken from 100 Van Ness Avenue. The domed building in the center is the San Francisco City Hall, flanked by the War Memorial Opera House and the Herbst Theatre on the left, and Civic Center Plaza on the right.

Photograph credit: Dllu


April 27

Gioachino Rossini

Gioachino Rossini (1792–1868) was an Italian composer who gained fame for the 39 operas he composed. This caricature by Charles Motte, captioned La Soirée de Brigton [sic], shows King George IV of the United Kingdom (left) greeting the composer (right) at the Brighton Pavilion in 1823. Having grown used to adulation in the capitals of Europe, Rossini was by then unimpressed by royalty and the aristocracy.

Lithograph credit: Charles Motte; restored by Adam Cuerden


April 26

House in Provence

House in Provence is an oil-on-canvas painting by the French artist Paul Cézanne, depicting a home painted with muted tones and soft colors, accented by the gray-blue mountains in the background, the soft greens of the rolling hills, and the brown tones of the fields. This landscape is set on the south side of Montagne Sainte-Victoire in southern France, which was a favorite subject of the artist. The painting is in the collection of the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Painting credit: Paul Cézanne


April 25

Mangrove pitta

The mangrove pitta (Pitta megarhyncha) is a species of passerine bird in the family Pittidae native to the eastern Indian subcontinent and the westernmost parts of Southeast Asia. In general, pittas are reclusive birds and difficult to observe, but this species is easier than most, calling from high in mangrove trees, and responding readily to recordings of its voice. This mangrove pitta was photographed at Pulau Ubin in Singapore.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


April 24

Tomb of Nebamun

The Tomb of Nebamun is the burial place of a middle-ranking official from the Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt who lived around 1350 BCE and worked at the vast temple complex near Thebes. The richly decorated tomb was discovered in 1820 by a young Greek, Giovanni d'Athanasi, an agent for the English Egyptologist Henry Salt. Portions of the plaster frescoes were hacked off the walls and sold to the British Museum the following year. This polychrome fragment depicts date palms, sycamore trees, and a pool teeming with life. D'Athanasi died in poverty without revealing the precise location of the tomb.

Painting credit: unknown; photographed by Yann Forget


April 23

Presidency of James Buchanan

James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) served as President of the United States for a single term from 1857 to 1861. He was unable to calm the growing sectional crisis that would divide the nation. In the midst of the growing chasm between slave states and free states, the Panic of 1857 occurred, causing widespread business failures and high unemployment. After Abraham Lincoln was elected president in 1860, seven Southern states declared their secession from the Union, a crisis which culminated in the outbreak of the American Civil War shortly after Buchanan left office. Buchanan is consistently ranked as one of the worst presidents in the country's history.

Engraving credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


April 22

Recruitment to the British Army during the First World War

This poster was produced in May 1915 to advertise recruitment to the British Army during the First World War. Created for the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee, the poster depicts two women and a child looking out of an open window at a column of soldiers marching past, with the text "Women of Britain Say – 'Go!'". At the beginning of 1914, the British Army had a reported strength of 710,000 men, including reserves. By the end of hostilities, over five million men had joined up, 2.67 million as volunteers and 2.77 million as conscripts.

Poster credit: E. J. Kealey; restored by Adam Cuerden


April 21

Cirsium eriophorum

Cirsium eriophorum, the woolly thistle, is a tall biennial plant native to Central and Western Europe. The large, globose flowers can be up to 7 cm (2.8 in) in diameter. Each flower contains many tubular florets, with long purple tubes and purple stamens, each with a spiny bract covered with white woolly hairs through which a spine projects. This woolly thistle was photographed in Kozara National Park, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Photograph credit: Petar Milošević


April 20

Ignace-Gaston Pardies

Ignace-Gaston Pardies (1636–1673) was a French Catholic priest and scientist. His celestial atlas, entitled Globi coelestis in tabulas planas redacti descriptio, comprising six charts of the sky, was first published in 1674. The atlas uses a gnomonic projection so that the plates make up a cube of the celestial sphere, and served as a model for William Rutter Dawes's 1844 star charts. This is the first plate from a 1693 edition of Pardies's atlas, centred on the north celestial pole and depicting part of the northern sky.

Map credit: Ignace-Gaston Pardies


April 19

Jawi alphabet

The Jawi alphabet is an Arabic-based writing system used to write the Malay language and several other Southeast Asian languages. This photograph shows an 1803 Netherlands Indies gulden silver rupee coin, minted at the Java Mint in the Dutch East Indies, featuring Jawi script; the image of the reverse (on the right) is inverted.

Coin credit: Java Mint; photographed by Heritage Auctions


April 18

Booker T. Washington

Booker T. Washington (1856–1915) was an American educator, author, orator, and adviser to multiple presidents of the United States. Born into slavery, he became the leading voice of former slaves and their descendants, and was one of the founders of the National Negro Business League. His long-term goal was to end the disenfranchisement of the vast majority of African Americans, who at that time still lived in the South. After his death, his legacy was seen as controversial by the civil-rights community, which criticised him for accommodating excessively to white supremacy.

Photograph credit: Frances Benjamin Johnston; restored by Adam Cuerden


April 17

Clavulinopsis sulcata

Clavulinopsis sulcata is a clavarioid fungus that grows on the ground among plant litter. First described from South Africa, it is also found in North America, Asia and Australasia. This clump of C. sulcata was photographed near the Lane Cove River in New South Wales, Australia.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


April 16

Charles J. Folger

Charles J. Folger (April 16, 1818 – September 4, 1884) was an American lawyer and politician. He was a Republican member of the New York State Senate from 1862 to 1869, serving as president pro tempore for four years. In 1870, he was elected one of the first judges of the re-organized New York Court of Appeals. He became the chief judge, but resigned in 1881 to serve as United States Secretary of the Treasury.

Engraving credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


April 15

Carol W. Greider

Carol W. Greider (born April 15, 1961) is an American molecular biologist. She completed her PhD in 1987 at the University of California, Berkeley, under Elizabeth Blackburn. Their research focused on telomeres, with which the ends of chromosomes are tipped, and they discovered the enzyme telomerase which replenishes the tips and determines the life span of the cell. For these discoveries, she shared the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Blackburn and Jack W. Szostak.

Photograph credit: Keith Weller; edited by Adam Cuerden


April 14

Frederick Fleet

Frederick Fleet (1887–1965) was a British sailor, crewman and survivor of the sinking of the Titanic after the ship struck an iceberg in the North Atlantic at 11:40 pm on 14 April 1912. As one of two lookouts on duty aboard the Titanic at the time of the collision, it was Fleet who first sighted the iceberg, ringing the bridge to proclaim: "Iceberg, right ahead!"

Photograph credit: unknown


April 13

Hurdling

Hurdling is the act of running over an obstacle at high speed or in a sprint. It is a highly specialized form of obstacle racing, and forms part of track and field in the sport of athletics. In hurdling events, barriers known as hurdles are set at precisely measured heights and distances. This photograph shows the Austrian athlete Leon Okafor taking part in the men's 110-metre (120 yd) hurdles at the Leichtathletik Gala in Linz in 2018.

Photograph credit: Isiwal


April 12

Kennedy Space Center

The John F. Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, Florida, is NASA's primary launch center of human spaceflight. Launch operations for the Apollo, Skylab and Space Shuttle programs were carried out here. This photograph shows Space Shuttle Atlantis at Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39A in the evening before the launch of STS-129, a mission to the International Space Station in November 2009.

Photograph credit: NASA / Bill Ingalls; retouched by Bammesk


April 11

Ploughed Fields ('The Furrows')

Wheat Fields is a series of dozens of paintings by Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh. Ploughed Fields ('The Furrows'), painted in 1888, shows a field after ploughing with the earth lying in rough clods before the wheat has been sown. The picture is in the collection of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.

Painting credit: Vincent van Gogh


April 10

Red-billed streamertail

The red-billed streamertail (Trochilus polytmus) is the most common hummingbird in Jamaica, where it is the national bird. The female, shown here in hovering flight, lacks the red bill and long tail streamers of the male. The species's diet consists of nectar and small insects caught on the wing.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


April 9

BASE jumping

BASE jumping is the recreational sport of jumping from fixed objects, using a parachute to descend safely to the ground. The acronym stands for four categories of fixed objects from which the jumps can be made: buildings, antennae, spans, and earth (cliffs). In this photograph, a BASE jumper launches himself from the top of the Sapphire Tower in Istanbul, Turkey.

Photograph credit: Kontizas Dimitrios


April 8

The Hunting of the Snark

The Hunting of the Snark is a nonsense poem written by English writer Lewis Carroll between 1874 and 1876. The plot follows a crew of ten trying to hunt the Snark, which may turn out to be a highly dangerous Boojum. This original illustration by Henry Holiday accompanies the verse:

    "But oh, beamish nephew, beware of the day,
        If your Snark be a Boojum! For then
    You will softly and suddenly vanish away,
        And never be met with again!"

Illustration credit: Henry Holiday; restored by Adam Cuerden


April 7

Danaus genutia

Danaus genutia, the common tiger or striped tiger, is a species of brush-footed butterfly found in Sri Lanka, India, Myanmar, south-eastern Asia and Australia. It prefers areas of moderate to heavy rainfall, and typical habitats include scrubby jungle, deciduous forests and fallow land near habitations. The insect sequesters toxins from plants, and advertises its unpalatability by having prominent markings and striking colour patterns. This adult male common tiger, of the subspecies D. g. genutia, was photographed in Kerala, India.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


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