Page semi-protected

Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Archive

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Featured content:

Featured picture tools:

Picture of the day archives

2004
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2005
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2006
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2007
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2008
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2009
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2010
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2011
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2012
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2013
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2014
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2015
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2016
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2017
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2018
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2019
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2020
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2021
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2022
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

These featured pictures, as scheduled below, appeared as the picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page in the last 30 days.

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


September 15

Subpage 1

Cuban five-centavo banknote

The Cuban peso is the official currency of Cuba. Under the Spanish administration, the Banco Español de la Habana introduced Cuba's first issue of banknotes in 1857 in denominations of 50, 100, 300, 500 and 1,000 dollars. Beginning in 1872, fractional peso banknotes were issued in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 25 and 50 centavos, printed in strips of ten. This five-centavo banknote was issued in 1876, and now forms part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Banknote design credit: American Bank Note Company; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 2

Cuban ten-centavo banknote

The Cuban peso is the official currency of Cuba. Under the Spanish administration, the Banco Español de la Habana introduced Cuba's first issue of banknotes in 1857 in denominations of 50, 100, 300, 500 and 1,000 dollars. Beginning in 1872, fractional peso banknotes were issued in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 25 and 50 centavos, printed in strips of ten. This ten-centavo banknote was issued in 1883, and now forms part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Banknote design credit: American Bank Note Company; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 3

Cuban twenty-centavo banknote

The Cuban peso is the official currency of Cuba. Under the Spanish administration, the Banco Español de la Habana introduced Cuba's first issue of banknotes in 1857 in denominations of 50, 100, 300, 500 and 1,000 dollars. Beginning in 1872, fractional peso banknotes were issued in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 25 and 50 centavos, printed in strips of ten. This twenty-centavo banknote was issued in 1897, by which time the bank had been renamed the Banco Español de la Isla de Cuba. The banknote now forms part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Banknote design credit: American Bank Note Company; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 4

Cuban twenty-five-centavo banknote

The Cuban peso is the official currency of Cuba. Under the Spanish administration, the Banco Español de la Habana introduced Cuba's first issue of banknotes in 1857 in denominations of 50, 100, 300, 500 and 1,000 dollars. Beginning in 1872, fractional peso banknotes were issued in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 25 and 50 centavos, printed in strips of ten. This twenty-five-centavo banknote was issued in 1872, and now forms part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Banknote design credit: American Bank Note Company; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Subpage 5

Cuban fifty-centavo banknote

The Cuban peso is the official currency of Cuba. Under the Spanish administration, the Banco Español de la Habana introduced Cuba's first issue of banknotes in 1857 in denominations of 50, 100, 300, 500 and 1,000 dollars. Beginning in 1872, fractional peso banknotes were issued in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 25 and 50 centavos, printed in strips of ten. This fifty-centavo banknote was issued in 1896, by which time the bank had been renamed the Banco Español de la Isla de Cuba. The banknote now forms part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Banknote design credit: American Bank Note Company; photographed by Andrew Shiva


September 14

Red-backed shrike

The red-backed shrike (Lanius collurio) is a carnivorous passerine bird and a member of the shrike family, Laniidae. It breeds in a range stretching from western Europe eastwards to central Russia, and it overwinters in the eastern areas of tropical and southern Africa. About 17 centimetres (7 inches) in length, it feeds on large insects, small birds, frogs, rodents and lizards. Like other shrikes, it hunts from prominent perches, and impales corpses on thorns or barbed wire as a "larder". This male red-backed shrike was photographed at Lake Kerkini in northern Greece.

Photograph credit: Antonios Tsaknakis


September 13

Total internal reflection

Total internal reflection is the optical phenomenon in which light waves are completely reflected under certain conditions when they arrive at the boundary between one medium and another. This photograph was taken from near the bottom of the shallow end of a swimming pool. The swimmer has disturbed the water surface above her, scrambling the lower half of her reflection, and distorting the reflection of the ladder. Most of the surface is still calm, giving a clear reflection of the tiled bottom of the pool. The air above the water is not visible except at the top of the frame where the angle of incidence of light waves is less than the critical angle and therefore total internal reflection has not occurred.

Photograph credit: Jean-Marc Kuffer


September 12

Philip Francis Thomas

Philip Francis Thomas (12 September 1810 – 2 October 1890) was an American lawyer and politician. He served in the Maryland House of Delegates and was the 28th governor of Maryland from 1848 to 1851. In 1860, he was appointed as the 23rd United States secretary of the treasury, in President James Buchanan's administration. He held the post for only one month, resigning after he failed to obtain a loan to pay the interest on the bonded public debt. After unsuccessfully standing for election to the United States Senate in 1878, he returned to the Maryland House of Delegates and later resumed the practice of law.

Engraving credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


September 11

Martha Ann Honeywell

Martha Ann Honeywell (1786–1856) was an American disabled artist who produced silhouettes and paper-cutout images using only her mouth, arm stumps and toes, often in public performances. She sold cutouts such as this one as souvenirs. The text at the center of this cutout, with framed dimensions of 8+14 in × 7+58 in (21 cm × 19 cm), is the standard text of the Lord's Prayer, signed underneath with the inscription "Written without hands by Martha Honeywell". The work is now in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Cutout credit: Martha Ann Honeywell


September 10

Papilio polymnestor

Papilio polymnestor, the blue Mormon, is a species of swallowtail butterfly found in southern India and Sri Lanka. It is a woodland species, often seen on forest paths and near streams. The larvae feed on trees in the family Rutaceae, such as citrus. Young larvae are green with white markings and position themselves on the upper surface of leaves, relying on their cryptic colouring, which resembles bird droppings, for protection. Older larvae seek less conspicuous locations, and have a unique habit of securing their balance by weaving silk on the substratum. This adult male P. polymnestor butterfly was photographed in the Indian state of Kerala.

Photograph credit: Jeevan Jose


September 9

Utah Territory

The Utah Territory was a U.S. territory in the Western United States that existed from its creation on September 9, 1850, to its admission to the Union on January 4, 1896 as the State of Utah. This picture shows the Utah Territory's historical coat of arms, as illustrated by American engraver Henry Mitchell in State Arms of the Union, published in 1876 by Louis Prang. The escutcheon depicts a beehive, representing the state's industrious and hard-working inhabitants, and sego lilies symbolizing peace.

Illustration credit: Henry Mitchell; restored by Andrew Shiva


September 8

Ālī Qāpū

Ālī Qāpū is an imperial palace in Isfahan, Iran, built in the late 16th century. The palace served as the official residence of Persian emperors of the Safavid dynasty. In 1979, UNESCO inscribed the palace and the adjoining Naqsh-e Jahan Square as a World Heritage Site due to their cultural and historical importance. This panoramic photograph of Ālī Qāpū, captured using high-dynamic-range imaging during the golden hour, consists of twenty-five frames digitally merged together.

Photograph credit: Amir Pashaei


September 7

Howell Cobb

Howell Cobb (September 7, 1815 – October 9, 1868) was an American politician and five-term member of the United States House of Representatives who served as Speaker of the House from 1849 to 1851. He also served as the 40th governor of Georgia from 1851 to 1853, and as Secretary of the Treasury under President James Buchanan from 1857 to 1860. Cobb is probably best known as one of the founders of the Confederacy, having served as president of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States. This line engraving of Cobb was produced around 1902 by the Department of the Treasury's Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) as part of a BEP presentation album of the first 42 secretaries of the treasury.

Engraving credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


September 6

Marie-Gabrielle Capet

Marie-Gabrielle Capet (6 September 1761 – 1 November 1818) was a French Neoclassical painter. Until the French Revolution, the Royal Academy of Art in Paris was responsible for training artists and exhibiting artworks at the Salon, but limited the number of female students to four at a time. Unable to gain a place, she moved to Paris in 1781 to become a student of Adélaïde Labille-Guiard, with whom she struck up a lifelong friendship. She specialised in painting portraits, her works including oil paintings, watercolours and miniatures. This oil-on-canvas self-portrait of Capet, dating from around 1783, is in the collection of the National Museum of Western Art in Tokyo.

Painting credit: Marie-Gabrielle Capet


September 5

Orange-headed thrush

The orange-headed thrush (Geokichla citrina) is a species of bird in the thrush family, Turdidae. About 225 mm (9 in) in length, it is common in well-wooded areas of the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia, but is a shy, secretive bird, usually occurring alone or in pairs. It mainly feeds on the ground in dense undergrowth, and is most active at dawn and dusk, probing the leaf litter for insects and their larvae, spiders, other invertebrates and fruit. This male orange-headed thrush, of the subspecies G. c. innotata, was photographed in Khao Yai National Park in Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


September 4

Pauline Adams

Pauline Adams (1874–1957) was an Irish-American suffragist. On 4 September 1917, she and twelve other activists were arrested for attempting to "flaunt their banners" in front of President Woodrow Wilson's reviewing stand before a Selective Service parade in Washington, D.C., and they chose prison rather than paying a 25-dollar fine. This photograph depicts Adams seated at a table, wearing prison uniform and holding a cup in her raised right hand. The image was published in the newspaper The Suffragist in 1919.

Photograph credit: unknown; restored by Adam Cuerden


September 3

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‑CoV‑2) is the virus that causes COVID-19, the respiratory illness responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. Like other coronaviruses, SARS-CoV-2 has four structural proteins, known by the letters S (spike), E (envelope), M (membrane), and N (nucleocapsid); the N protein holds the RNA genome, and the S, E, and M proteins together create the viral envelope. This colourised transmission electron micrograph shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a laboratory. The crown-like spikes on the outer edge of the virus particles give coronaviruses their name, derived from Latin corona, 'crown'.

Photograph credit: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Rocky Mountain Laboratories


September 2

Liliʻuokalani

Liliʻuokalani (September 2, 1838 – November 11, 1917) was the only queen regnant and the last sovereign monarch of the Hawaiian Kingdom. She ascended to the throne on January 29, 1891, nine days after the death of her brother King Kalākaua. During her reign, she attempted to draft a new constitution in 1893 that would restore the power of the monarchy and the voting rights of the economically disenfranchised. Threatened by her attempts to abrogate the 1887 Bayonet Constitution, pro-American elements in Hawaii overthrew the monarchy on January 17, 1893. She was placed under house arrest, was forced to abdicate the Hawaiian throne and lived the rest of her life as a private citizen. This photograph of Liliʻuokalani was signed by the queen herself and addressed to Josephus Daniels, United States Secretary of the Navy.

Photograph credit: James J. Williams; restored by Adam Cuerden


September 1

Pieris brassicae

Pieris brassicae, the large white, is a species of butterfly in the family Pieridae, common in Europe, Asia and North Africa. The larva pictured here, which was found at a market in Fronton, France, is a serious pest of plants in the cabbage family, Brassicaceae. The eggs are laid in batches on the undersides of the leaves of plants rich in mustard-oil glucosides, and consumption of these substances as they chew the leaves makes the larvae distasteful; the bright colouration of the larvae signals to predators that they taste bad. Additionally, the adult butterflies emit an unpleasant smell and display warning colours.

Photograph credit: Didier Descouens


August 31

Marino Faliero

Marino Faliero is a tragic opera in three acts by Gaetano Donizetti. The Italian libretto was written by Giovanni Emanuele Bidera, who was inspired by a drama by Lord Byron, based on the life of Marino Faliero, a 14th-century doge of Venice. This lithograph shows the set design for the second act of the opera's premiere, which took place in Paris on 12 March 1835.

Illustration credit: Luigi Verardi, after Domenico Ferri; restored by Adam Cuerden


August 30

Albury railway station

Albury railway station is a heritage-listed railway station at Railway Place in Albury, New South Wales, adjacent to the border with the state of Victoria, in Australia. The buildings were erected in 1880 and 1881, at a time when increasing wool trade from the Riverina region was driving expansion of the railway network. The station was the terminus for the Main Southern Railway until 1962. The yard was designed to facilitate the interchange of goods and passenger traffic arriving on tracks of different gauges and remains as an operational railway yard and passenger station. To accommodate the break of gauge, a very long railway platform was built, the covered platform being one of the longest in Australia.

Photograph credit: David Gubler


August 29

Averbode Abbey

Averbode Abbey is a Premonstratensian abbey in Averbode, in the municipality of Scherpenheuvel-Zichem, Belgium. The abbey was founded about 1134, suppressed in 1797, and re-established in 1834. The church is a synthesis of Baroque and Gothic architecture, with Renaissance ornamental details, and dominates the monastery complex; it was built between 1664 and 1672, to a design by the Antwerp architect Jan Van den Eynde II. This view of the church's interior shows the chancel, with the choir in the foreground and the sanctuary in the background.

Photograph credit: Marc Ryckaert


August 28

Campbell albatross

The Campbell albatross (Thalassarche impavida) is a medium-sized mollymawk in the albatross family, Diomedeidae. It breeds only on Campbell Island / Motu Ihupuku and the associated islet of Jeanette Marie, in an uninhabited subantarctic island group of New Zealand located in the South Pacific. Because of its restricted breeding range, the bird is considered to be a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The greatest threat it faces is from the fishing industry. This Campbell albatross in flight was photographed off the south-eastern coast of Tasmania, Australia.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


August 27

The Guilty Mother

The Guilty Mother is the third play of the Figaro trilogy by Pierre Beaumarchais, following The Barber of Seville and The Marriage of Figaro. Like its predecessors, it has been turned into operatic form, but unlike them, has failed to enter the general opera repertoire. This 1876 illustration by Émile Bayard shows one of the main characters, the Irishman Bégearss, a major in the Spanish military, and a great schemer and stirrer-up of trouble.

Illustration credit: Émile Bayard; restored by Adam Cuerden


August 26

Canary Wharf

Canary Wharf is an area of London on the Isle of Dogs. It is defined by the Greater London Authority as being part of London's central business district, alongside Central London. Along with the City of London, Canary Wharf is one of the main financial centres of the United Kingdom and the world, containing many high-rise buildings including the fourth-tallest in the UK, One Canada Square, which opened on 26 August 1991.

Photograph credit: Tony Jin


August 25

The Fiancée of Belus

The Fiancée of Belus is a large narrative painting by the French artist Henri-Paul Motte based on a fanciful Babylonian ritual associated with the deity Belus (Bel). According to that ritual, the deity was offered a girl who sat on the lap of Bel's statue overnight, to be replaced the following day by another. All the girls were said to have been winners of daily beauty contests. For the interior of the Babylonian temple, Motte copied the Greek temple in Olympia, while the sculpture is inspired by the Assyrian deity Lamassu. The painting is in the collection of the Musée d'Orsay.

Painting credit: Henri-Paul Motte


August 24

Argiope trifasciata

Argiope trifasciata, the banded garden or banded orb-weaving spider, is a species of arachnid in the family Araneidae. It is native to North and South America but has spread to other parts of the world. This ventral view of a female A. trifasciata shows her in the centre of her web, which can reach a diameter of 60 cm (24 in). The function of the zig-zag web decorations is unclear, but they may serve to make the spider appear larger or to act as a warning sign.

Photograph credit: Joaquim Alves Gaspar


August 23

Lockheed F-117 Nighthawk

The Lockheed F-117 Nighthawk is a semi-retired American single-seat, twin-engine stealth and attack aircraft that was developed by Lockheed's secretive Skunk Works division and operated by the United States Air Force. Its maiden flight took place in 1981, and it was the first operational aircraft to be designed around stealth technology. This F-117 was photographed flying over Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada.

Photograph credit: Aaron Allmon II


August 22

Emma Smith DeVoe

Emma Smith DeVoe (August 22, 1848 – September 3, 1927) was a leading advocate for women's suffrage in the United States in the early 20th century. She was inspired as a child by hearing a speech by Susan B. Anthony, and became an excellent public speaker over time, being mentored by Anthony herself. After campaigning in South Dakota and successfully obtaining the vote for women in Idaho, the National American Woman Suffrage Association sent her to Kentucky, and she eventually made speeches and organized new suffrage groups in 28 states and territories. Moving to Washington, she was made president of the Washington Equal Suffrage Association; in 1910, the state became the fifth in the country to grant women suffrage.

Photograph credit: James & Bushnell; restored by Adam Cuerden


August 21

Village weaver

The village weaver (Ploceus cucullatus) is a species of bird in the family Ploceidae, found in much of sub-Saharan Africa. This often abundant species occurs in a wide range of open or semi-open habitats, and frequently forms large, noisy colonies in towns, villages and hotel grounds. This male, of the subspecies P. c. bohndorffi, was photographed building a nest in Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda. Male birds make elaborate nests, each incorporating about 300 strips of palm or grass leaves that they have torn off the plant and transported individually. These are woven together to form roofed, dangling structures with the entrance at the bottom. The only involvement of the female is in the creation of the lining of the egg-laying cup.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


August 20

Christina Nilsson

Christina Nilsson (1843–1921) was a Swedish operatic soprano. After four years' study in Paris, she made her operatic debut in 1864 in the title role of Verdi's La traviata at the Théâtre Lyrique. After this success, she sang at major opera houses in London, New York City, Moscow, Saint Petersburg, Brussels and Munich.

Photograph credit: Nadar; restored by Jebulon


August 19

Bryce Canyon National Park

Bryce Canyon National Park is an American national park located in southwestern Utah. The major feature of the park is Bryce Canyon, which despite its name, is not a canyon, but a collection of giant natural amphitheaters along the eastern side of the Paunsaugunt Plateau. This panoramic view, as seen from Inspiration Point, shows the colorful Claron Formation, from which the park's delicate hoodoos are carved; the sediments were laid down in a system of streams and lakes that existed from 63 to about 40 million years ago (from the Paleocene to the Eocene epochs). The brown, pink and red colors are from hematite, the yellows from limonite, and the purples from pyrolusite.

Photograph credit: Tony Jin


August 18

Plate 2 of Ignace-Gaston Pardies's celestial atlas

Ignace-Gaston Pardies (1636–1673) was a French Catholic priest and scientist. His celestial atlas, entitled Globi coelestis in tabulas planas redacti descriptio, comprised six charts of the night sky and was first published in 1674. The atlas uses a gnomonic projection so that the plates make up a cube of the celestial sphere. The constellation figures are drawn from Uranometria, but were carefully reworked and adapted to a broader view of the sky. This is the second plate from a 1693 edition of Pardies's atlas, featuring constellations including Pegasus and Andromeda, visible in the northern sky.

Map credit: Ignace-Gaston Pardies


August 17

Panther chameleon

The panther chameleon (Furcifer pardalis) is a species of lizard found in tropical forests in the eastern and northern parts of Madagascar. Like all chameleons, the species exhibits a specialized arrangement of toes in which the digits are fused into a group of two and a group of three. On the forelimbs, there are two toes on the outer side of each foot and three on the inside, with the arrangement reversed on the hind legs. Their specialized feet allow them a tight grip on narrow branches, and their sharp claws give them traction when climbing on bark. This male panther chameleon was photographed on the island of Nosy Be, off the northwestern coast of Madagascar.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


Picture of the day archives

2004
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2005
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2006
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2007
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2008
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2009
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2010
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2011
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2012
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2013
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2014
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2015
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2016
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2017
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2018
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2019
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2020
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2021
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2022
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December