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These featured pictures, as scheduled below, appeared as the picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page in the last 30 days.

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


October 19

Red-billed gull

The red-billed gull (Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae scopulinus), also known as the tarāpung, is a member of the gull family, Laridae. Endemic to New Zealand, it is found throughout the country and on outlying islands including the Chatham Islands and the New Zealand Subantarctic Islands. Formerly considered a separate species, it is now usually treated as a subspecies of the silver gull. It regularly feeds on small fish, shell fish and worms, and sometimes berries, lizards and insects; it scavenges among urban waste in coastal towns. This red-billed gull was photographed in Christchurch.

Photograph credit: Michal Klajban


October 18

Kriéger Company of Electric Vehicles

The Kriéger Company of Electric Vehicles was founded in 1898 by Louis Antoine Kriéger in France to manufacture automobiles. At least three battery-powered models were produced, the Brougham, the Landaulette and the Electrolette. This photograph shows U.S. senator George P. Wetmore of Rhode Island in a Kriéger Landaulette in around 1906. The senator is accompanied by a woman (presumably his wife), a chauffeur and a footman.

Photograph credit: Harris & Ewing; restored by Adam Cuerden


October 17

Old Cathedral, Brescia

The Old Cathedral, Brescia, or the Duomo Vecchio, is a Catholic church in Brescia, Italy. One of the most important examples of a round church in the Romanesque style, the rustic co-cathedral stands next to the New Cathedral.

Photograph credit: Wolfgang Moroder


October 16

William P. Fessenden

William P. Fessenden (October 16, 1806 – September 8, 1869) was an American politician from the state of Maine. He served in the United States House of Representatives and the Senate before becoming Secretary of the Treasury under President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War. This line engraving of Fessenden was produced around 1902 by the Department of the Treasury's Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) as part of a BEP presentation album of the first 42 secretaries of the treasury.

Engraving credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


October 15

Bee hummingbird

The bee hummingbird (Mellisuga helenae) is endemic to Cuba and is the smallest bird in the world and smallest known dinosaur. This immature male has yet to develop the iridescent blue plumage of the adult. The bee hummingbird feeds mainly on nectar, probing deep into flowers with its bill and moving its tongue rapidly in and out. In the process of feeding, the bird picks up pollen on its bill and head. As it flies from flower to flower, it transfers the pollen, and in this way plays an important role in plant reproduction. In one day, the bee hummingbird may visit 1,500 flowers.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


October 14

Ferdinand VII of Spain

Ferdinand VII of Spain (14 October 1784 – 29 September 1833) was King of Spain during the early- to mid-19th century. He reigned over the Spanish Kingdom in 1808 and again from 1813 until his death in 1833. This oil-on-canvas portrait of Ferdinand in his robes of state was painted by Francisco Goya in 1815, and is in the collection of the Museo del Prado in Madrid.

Painting credit: Francisco Goya


October 13

N700 Series Shinkansen

Line scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 01.pngLine scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 02.pngLine scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 03.pngLine scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 04.pngLine scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 05.pngLine scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 06.pngLine scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 07.pngLine scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 08.pngLine scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 09.pngLine scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 10.pngLine scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 11.pngLine scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 12.pngLine scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 13.pngLine scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 14.pngLine scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 15.pngLine scan photo of Shinkansen N700A Series Set G13 in 2017, car 16.png

The N700 Series Shinkansen is a Japanese Shinkansen high-speed train with tilting capability developed jointly by JR Central and JR West. It has been used on the Tokaido and San'yō Shinkansen lines since 2007. This photograph shows the train travelling at approximately 300 km/h through Himeji Station, and was captured with a line scan camera using strip photography.

Photograph credit: Dllu


October 12

Art and engraving on United States banknotes

Artists producing banknotes in Colonial America began experimenting with copper plates as an alternative to wood engraving in the early 18th century. Applied to the production of paper currency, copper-plate engraving, and later steel engraving, enabled banknote design and printing to rapidly advance during the 19th century. This engraved vignette appeared on certain United States five-dollar bills issued in 1875. Produced for the Department of the Treasury's Bureau of Engraving and Printing, the engraving is of John Vanderlyn's painting Landing of Columbus, which hangs in the United States Capitol rotunda. It depicts Christopher Columbus landing on San Salvador Island on October 12, 1492, on the first of his voyages to the New World.

Engraving credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing, after John Vanderlyn; restored by Andrew Shiva


October 11

Subpage 1

NASA space-flown Gemini and Apollo medallions

NASA space-flown Apollo medallions were mission-specific commemorative medallions which were approved by NASA and carried aboard the mission spacecraft into orbit. Apollo 7 (October 11 – 22, 1968) was the first crewed flight in NASA's Apollo program, and saw the resumption of human spaceflight by the agency after the fire that killed the three Apollo 1 astronauts during a launch rehearsal test on January 27, 1967. The Apollo 7 astronauts, Wally Schirra, Walter Cunningham and Donn F. Eisele, took part in the first live television broadcast from an American spacecraft.

The medallions were struck by the Robbins Company in sterling silver and ordered by the mission crew as a personal memento of their flight; they were often taken to the lunar surface in the landing module. A total of over 3,000 Robbins medallions were flown into space across the 12 crewed flights of the Apollo program.

Photograph credit: Heritage Auctions; commissioned by the NASA astronaut office

Subpage 2

NASA space-flown Gemini and Apollo medallions

NASA space-flown Apollo medallions were mission-specific commemorative medallions which were approved by NASA and carried aboard the mission spacecraft into orbit. Apollo 8 (December 21 – 27, 1968) was the first crewed spacecraft to leave low Earth orbit, and also the first human spaceflight to reach another astronomical object, the Moon, which the crew orbited without landing. The astronauts, Frank Borman, James Lovell, and William Anders, were the first humans to witness and photograph an earthrise.

The medallions were struck by the Robbins Company in sterling silver and ordered by the mission crew as a personal memento of their flight. A total of over 3,000 Robbins medallions were flown into space across the 12 crewed flights of the Apollo program.

Photograph credit: Heritage Auctions; commissioned by the NASA astronaut office

Subpage 3

NASA space-flown Gemini and Apollo medallions

NASA space-flown Apollo medallions were mission-specific commemorative medallions which were approved by NASA and carried aboard the mission spacecraft into orbit. Apollo 9 (March 3 – 13, 1969) was the third human spaceflight in NASA's Apollo program. Flown in low Earth orbit, it was the second crewed Apollo mission that the United States launched via a Saturn V rocket. The three-man crew consisted of James McDivitt, David Scott, and Rusty Schweickart; during the mission they tested systems and procedures critical to landing on the Moon, including the lunar module engines, backpack life support systems, navigation systems and docking maneuvers.

The medallions were struck by the Robbins Company in sterling silver and ordered by the mission crew as a personal memento of their flight. A total of over 3,000 Robbins medallions were flown into space across the 12 crewed flights of the Apollo program.

Photograph credit: Heritage Auctions; commissioned by the NASA astronaut office

Subpage 4

NASA space-flown Gemini and Apollo medallions

NASA space-flown Apollo medallions were mission-specific commemorative medallions which were approved by NASA and carried aboard the mission spacecraft into orbit. Apollo 10 (May 18 – 26, 1969) was the fourth crewed mission in the United States Apollo program, and the second (after Apollo 8) to orbit the Moon. While astronaut John Young remained in the Command Module orbiting the Moon, astronauts Thomas Stafford and Gene Cernan test flew the Apollo Lunar Module but did not land.

The medallions were struck by the Robbins Company in sterling silver and ordered by the mission crew as a personal memento of their flight. A total of over 3,000 Robbins medallions were flown into space across the 12 crewed flights of the Apollo program.

Photograph credit: Heritage Auctions; commissioned by the NASA astronaut office

Subpage 5

NASA space-flown Gemini and Apollo medallions

NASA space-flown Apollo medallions were mission-specific commemorative medallions which were approved by NASA and carried aboard the mission spacecraft into orbit. Apollo 11 (July 16–24, 1969) was the spaceflight that first landed humans on the Moon. Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin formed the American crew that landed the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle on the lunar surface on July 20, 1969, at 20:17 UTC.

The medallions were struck by the Robbins Company in sterling silver and ordered by the mission crew as a personal memento of their flight; they were often taken to the lunar surface in the landing module. A total of over 3,000 Robbins medallions were flown into space across the 12 crewed flights of the Apollo program.

Photograph credit: Heritage Auctions; commissioned by the NASA astronaut office

Subpage 6

NASA space-flown Gemini and Apollo medallions

NASA space-flown Apollo medallions were mission-specific commemorative medallions which were approved by NASA and carried aboard the mission spacecraft into orbit. Apollo 12 (November 14 – 24, 1969) was the sixth crewed flight in the United States Apollo program and the second to land on the Moon. It was launched on November 14, 1969, from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Commander Charles "Pete" Conrad and Lunar Module Pilot Alan L. Bean performed just over one day and seven hours of lunar surface activity while Command Module Pilot Richard F. Gordon remained in lunar orbit.

The medallions were struck by the Robbins Company in sterling silver and ordered by the mission crew as a personal memento of their flight; they were often taken to the lunar surface in the landing module. A total of over 3,000 Robbins medallions were flown into space across the 12 crewed flights of the Apollo program.

Photograph credit: Heritage Auctions; commissioned by the NASA astronaut office

Subpage 7

NASA space-flown Gemini and Apollo medallions

NASA space-flown Apollo medallions were mission-specific commemorative medallions which were approved by NASA and carried aboard the mission spacecraft into orbit. Apollo 13 (April 11 – 17, 1970) was the seventh crewed mission in the Apollo space program, but the intended lunar landing was aborted after an oxygen tank in the service module failed two days into the mission. The commander, Jim Lovell, with crew members Jack Swigert and Fred Haise, were brought safely back to Earth, using the lunar module as a lifeboat.

The medallions were struck by the Robbins Company in sterling silver and ordered by the mission crew as a personal memento of their flight; they were often taken to the lunar surface in the landing module. A total of over 3,000 Robbins medallions were flown into space across the 12 crewed flights of the Apollo program.

Photograph credit: Heritage Auctions; commissioned by the NASA astronaut office

Subpage 8

NASA space-flown Gemini and Apollo medallions

NASA space-flown Apollo medallions were mission-specific commemorative medallions which were approved by NASA and carried aboard the mission spacecraft into orbit. Apollo 14 (January 31, 1971 – February 9, 1971) was the eighth crewed mission in the United States Apollo program and the third to land on the Moon. While Commander Alan Shepard and Lunar Module Pilot Edgar Mitchell landed, Command Module Pilot Stuart Roosa remained in lunar orbit, performing scientific experiments and photographing the Moon, including the landing site of the future Apollo 16 mission.

The medallions were struck by the Robbins Company in sterling silver and ordered by the mission crew as a personal memento of their flight; they were often taken to the lunar surface in the landing module. A total of over 3,000 Robbins medallions were flown into space across the 12 crewed flights of the Apollo program.

Photograph credit: Heritage Auctions; commissioned by the NASA astronaut office

Subpage 9

NASA space-flown Gemini and Apollo medallions

NASA space-flown Apollo medallions were mission-specific commemorative medallions which were approved by NASA and carried aboard the mission spacecraft into orbit. Apollo 15 (July 26 – August 7, 1971) was the ninth crewed mission in the United States' Apollo program and the fourth to land on the Moon. It was the first J mission, with a longer stay on the Moon and a greater focus on science than earlier landings. Commander David Scott and Lunar Module Pilot James Irwin landed and explored the local area using the Lunar Roving Vehicle, while Command Module Pilot Alfred Worden stayed on board.

The medallions were struck by the Robbins Company in sterling silver and ordered by the mission crew as a personal memento of their flight; they were often taken to the lunar surface in the landing module. A total of over 3,000 Robbins medallions were flown into space across the 12 crewed flights of the Apollo program.

Photograph credit: Heritage Auctions; commissioned by the NASA astronaut office

Subpage 10

NASA space-flown Gemini and Apollo medallions

NASA space-flown Apollo medallions were mission-specific commemorative medallions which were approved by NASA and carried aboard the mission spacecraft into orbit. Apollo 16 (April 16 – 27, 1972) was the tenth crewed mission in the United States Apollo space program, and the fifth and next-to-last to land on the Moon. It featured an extended stay on the lunar surface, a focus on science, and the use of the Lunar Roving Vehicle. The mission was crewed by Commander John Young, Lunar Module Pilot Charles Duke and Command Module Pilot Ken Mattingly.

The medallions were struck by the Robbins Company in sterling silver and ordered by the mission crew as a personal memento of their flight; they were often taken to the lunar surface in the landing module. A total of over 3,000 Robbins medallions were flown into space across the 12 crewed flights of the Apollo program.

Photograph credit: Heritage Auctions; commissioned by the NASA astronaut office

Subpage 11

NASA space-flown Gemini and Apollo medallions

NASA space-flown Apollo medallions were mission-specific commemorative medallions which were approved by NASA and carried aboard the mission spacecraft into orbit. Apollo 17 (December 7 – 19, 1972) was the final Moon landing mission of NASA's Apollo program, and remains the most recent time humans have traveled beyond low Earth orbit and also the most recent time humans have set foot on the Moon. The crew consisted of Commander Gene Cernan, Lunar Module Pilot Harrison Schmitt, and Command Module Pilot Ronald Evans

The medallions were struck by the Robbins Company in sterling silver and ordered by the mission crew as a personal memento of their flight; they were often taken to the lunar surface in the landing module. A total of over 3,000 Robbins medallions were flown into space across the 12 crewed flights of the Apollo program.

Photograph credit: Heritage Auctions; commissioned by the NASA astronaut office


October 10

Giuseppe Verdi

Giuseppe Verdi (1813–1901) was an Italian composer best known for his operas. He came to dominate the Italian opera scene after the era of Gioachino Rossini, Gaetano Donizetti and Vincenzo Bellini, whose works significantly influenced him. He is depicted here conducting the orchestra of the Paris Opera premiere of Aida (sung in French) at the Palais Garnier on 22 March 1880. The illustration was published in the 3 April 1880 edition of Le Monde illustré.

Illustration credit: Adrien Marie; restored by Adam Cuerden

Recently featured:

October 9

Marsh frog

The marsh frog (Pelophylax ridibundus) is a species of amphibian native to Europe and parts of Asia. It is the largest type of frog in most of its range, growing to a snout-to-vent length of around 100 mm (4 in); tadpoles can reach up to 190 mm (7.5 in) in length, but this usually occurs in places with long winters where the tadpole has time to grow. Marsh frogs hibernate during the winter, either underwater or in burrows, and are able to use the Earth's magnetic field to locate breeding ponds. This marsh frog was photographed in Kampinos National Park, Poland.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp

Recently featured:

October 8

Coat of arms of Texas

The Seal of Texas is the official insignia of the U.S. state of Texas. The seal is used by the state governor on official business and depicts a white five-pointed star on a blue background encircled by an olive branch and an oak branch. It incorporates imagery from the Texas state coat of arms, as illustrated here by American engraver Henry Mitchell in State Arms of the Union, published in 1876 by Louis Prang.

Illustration credit: Henry Mitchell; restored by Andrew Shiva

Recently featured:

October 7

Niels Bohr

Niels Bohr (7 October 1885 – 18 November 1962) was a Danish physicist who made foundational contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum theory. He advanced the theory of electrons travelling in orbits around the atom's nucleus, with the chemical properties of each element being largely determined by the number of electrons in the outer orbits of its atoms. He introduced the idea that an electron could drop from a higher-energy orbit to a lower one, in the process emitting a quantum of discrete energy. For his work, he received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1922.

Photograph credit: Bain News Service; restored by Bammesk

Recently featured:

October 6

Sulfur

Sulfur is an abundant, multivalent and nonmetallic chemical element. It is a bright yellow, crystalline solid at room temperature. Being abundantly available in native form, the element was known in ancient times and is referred to in the Torah (in the Book of Genesis). A natural form of sulfur known as shiliuhuang was known in China since the 6th century BC and found in Hanzhong. These sulfur crystals on a matrix, measuring 4.8 cm × 3.5 cm × 3 cm (1.9 in × 1.4 in × 1.2 in), was mined in Daniel Campos Province, Bolivia.

Photograph credit: Ivar Leidus

Recently featured:

October 5

Hofburg

The Hofburg Palace is the former principal imperial palace of the Habsburg dynasty. Located in the center of Vienna, it was built in the 13th century and expanded several times. Empress Maria Theresa had a 17th-century opera house converted into the dance and concert halls now known as the Redoutensäle, forming the Redoute Wing. This 1763 oil painting by Martin van Meytens depicts the hall on the occasion of the wedding supper of Princess Isabella of Parma and Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor, who were married on 5 October 1760.

Painting credit: Martin van Meytens


October 4

Yukon Delta

The Yukon Delta is a river delta formed by the Yukon River as it drains into the Bering Sea. It is part of the larger Yukon–Kuskokwim Delta, which includes the delta of the Kuskokwim River. The Yukon River rises in British Columbia, Canada, and flows through Yukon before entering the U.S. state of Alaska. This August 2017 satellite image of the Yukon Delta shows how the river branches into numerous distributary channels that meander through the low-lying terrain on their way to the sea. The sandy colour of these channels and the coastal water is indicative of the marine sediment the river carries to the sea at this time of year.

Photograph credit: European Space Agency / Sentinel-2


October 3

Black skimmer

The black skimmer (Rynchops niger) is a tern-like bird in the gull family Laridae, breeding in North and South America. Skimmers have the lower mandible (jawbone) and bill longer than the upper ones, which allows them to fly low over the water surface, skimming the water for small fish, insects, crustaceans and molluscs. This black skimmer was photographed fishing while in flight over the Rio Negro in the Pantanal, an area of tropical wetland in southwestern Brazil.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


October 2

Paul von Hindenburg

Paul von Hindenburg (2 October 1847 – 2 August 1934), was a German general and statesman who led the Imperial German Army during World War I. In 1925, he returned to public life to become the second elected president of the Weimar Republic. While he was personally opposed to Adolf Hitler and his Nazi Party, he nonetheless played a major role in the political instability that resulted in their rise to power, ultimately agreeing to appoint Hitler as Chancellor of Germany in January 1933 after the Nazis had become the largest party in the Reichstag. This 1914 photograph of Hindenburg in military uniform was taken by the German photographer Nicola Perscheid.

Photograph credit: Nicola Perscheid; restored by Adam Cuerden


October 1

Australian owlet-nightjar

The Australian owlet-nightjar (Aegotheles cristatus) is a nocturnal bird found in open woodland across Australia and in southern New Guinea. Despite not being an owl, it is colloquially known as the moth owl, and is the most common nocturnal bird in Australia; despite suffering from predation and competition by introduced species, it is not considered to be threatened. This Australian owlet-nightjar was photographed in a nesting hollow in Castlereagh Nature Reserve, New South Wales.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


September 30

Georges Ernest Boulanger

Georges Ernest Boulanger (29 April 1837 – 30 September 1891), nicknamed Général Revanche, was a French general and politician. An enormously popular public figure during the Third Republic, he won a series of elections and was feared to be powerful enough to establish himself as dictator at the zenith of his popularity in January 1889. This photograph of Boulanger was produced by the atelier of the French photographer Nadar.

Photograph credit: Atelier Nadar; restored by Adam Cuerden


September 29

Parson's chameleon

Parson's chameleon (Calumma parsonii) is a large species of chameleon, a lizard in the family Chamaeleonidae. The species is endemic to isolated pockets of humid primary forest in eastern and northern Madagascar. It is listed on CITES Appendix II, meaning that trade in this species is regulated. While it is illegal for most chameleon species from Madagascar to be exported, a limited number of Parson's chameleons can legally be exported each year from its native country. This female Parson's chameleon of the subspecies C. p. cristifer was photographed near Andasibe, Moramanga.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


September 28

Atari 2600

The Atari 2600, originally branded as the Atari Video Computer System, is a home video game console developed and produced by Atari. Released in September 1977, it popularized the use of microprocessor-based hardware and of games stored on swappable ROM cartridges, a format first used with the Fairchild Channel F the year before. The VCS was bundled with two joystick controllers, a conjoined pair of paddle controllers, and a game cartridge – initially Combat and later Pac-Man.

Photograph credit: Evan Amos


September 27

War pigeon

War pigeons are homing pigeons used in military service. They have long played an important role in war, often being used as military messengers. Before the advent of radio, carrier pigeons were used on the battlefield as a means for mobile forces to communicate with stationary headquarters. A metal canister containing the message was attached to the bird's leg. This photograph, in the Swiss Federal Archives, shows Swiss Armed Forces personnel preparing a pigeon for a mission during World War I. The Swiss army made extensive use of carrier pigeons, finally disbanding its pigeon section in 1996.

Photograph credit: unknown; restored by Adam Cuerden


September 26

Santi Giovanni e Paolo al Celio

Santi Giovanni e Paolo al Celio is an ancient basilica in Rome, located on the Caelian Hill. The first church was built there in 398, and a series of ancient Roman rooms with frescos were discovered under the nave during 19th-century excavations. The altar, in the background of this photograph, is built over a bath containing the remains of John and Paul, two Roman soldiers martyred under Emperor Julian in 362, and to whom the basilica is dedicated.

Photograph credit: Livioandronico2013


September 25

Equestrian Portrait of Cornelis and Michiel Pompe van Meerdervoort with Their Tutor and Coachman

Equestrian Portrait of Cornelis and Michiel Pompe van Meerdervoort with Their Tutor and Coachman, also known as Starting for the Hunt, is an oil-on-canvas painting by Aelbert Cuyp. Created around 1652–53, the painting depicts two young brothers and their retainers about to embark on a hunt. The ruined castle, likely intended to indicate the ancient lineage of those pictured, does not resemble the Pompe van Meerdervoort family home, and was originally painted in the left middleground before being repainted on the right. In the background on the left, sailing boats can be seen on the Rhine. The painting is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Painting credit: Aelbert Cuyp


September 24

Red-rumped parrot
Red-rumped parrot

The red-rumped parrot (Psephotus haematonotus) is a common bird native to south-eastern Australia. About 28 centimetres (11 in) long, the male's plumage is a bright emerald-green with yellow underparts, a brick-red rump and blue highlights on the upper back and wings; the female is altogether more dowdy, having dull-green wings and back, bluish-black wingtips and pale-olive underparts. These parrots are typically found in pairs or small groups in open country with access to water, including in suburban parks and gardens. These male and female red-rumped parrots were photographed in Cornwallis, New South Wales.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


September 23

The Tales of Hoffmann

The Tales of Hoffmann (Les contes d'Hoffmann) is an opéra fantastique by Jacques Offenbach. The French libretto was written by Jules Barbier based on three short stories by E. T. A. Hoffmann, who is the opera's protagonist. It was Offenbach's final work; he died in October 1880, four months before the premiere at the Opéra-Comique in Paris. This illustration, probably by Pierre-Auguste Lamy, shows the third act, set in Venice, as illustrated for the first production of the opera in 1881. This act was in fact omitted from the premiere performance itself, the orchestration being incomplete at the time of the composer's death.

Illustration credit: Pierre-Auguste Lamy (attributed); restored by Adam Cuerden


September 22

Lillian Ascough

Lillian Ascough (1880–1974) was an American suffragist. She served as the Connecticut chair of the National Woman's Party (NWP) and the vice president of the Michigan branch of the NWP. She was a speaker in the Suffrage Special, an event created by the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage in 1916, which toured the "free states" which had already allowed women's suffrage in the United States. This formal photographic portrait of Ascough was taken around 1915 and published in the magazine The Suffragist.

Photograph credit: Edmonston; restored by Adam Cuerden


September 21

Asahi Breweries

Asahi Breweries is a Japanese global beer, spirits, soft drinks and food business group. This photograph, taken during the blue hour with a full moon, shows the headquarters of Asahi Breweries in Sumida, Tokyo, as viewed from the wharf on the Sumida River near Azuma Bridge. The Asahi Beer Hall, topped by the Asahi Flame, designed by Philippe Starck, is visible on the right, with the Tokyo Skytree in the background on the left.

Photograph credit: Basile Morin


September 20

Indian rhinoceros

The Indian rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis) is a species of rhinoceros that once ranged across the entire northern part of the Indian subcontinent. As a result of habitat destruction and climatic changes, its range was gradually reduced such that, by the 19th century, it survived only in southern Nepal, northern Uttar Pradesh, northern Bihar, northern West Bengal, and in the Brahmaputra Valley in Assam. The species's range has since shrunk further, and its habitat is surrounded by human-dominated landscapes, so that in many areas, it occurs in cultivated areas, pastures, and secondary forests. It is currently listed as a vulnerable species on the IUCN Red List. This adult male Indian rhinoceros was photographed on the banks of the Gandaki River in Nepal.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


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