Wikipedia:Picture of the day/March 2021

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Picture of the day archives

2004
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2005
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2006
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2007
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2008
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2009
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2010
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2011
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2012
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2013
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2014
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2015
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2016
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2017
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2018
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2019
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2020
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2021
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2022
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

These featured pictures, as scheduled below, have been chosen to appear as the picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page in March 2021. Individual sections for each day on this page can be linked to with the day number as the anchor name (e.g. [[Wikipedia:Picture of the day/March 2021#1]] for March 1).

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


March 1

Pula Arena

This is a panoramic view of the interior of the Pula Arena, a Roman amphitheatre in Pula, Croatia. Constructed between 27 BC and AD 86, it is among the six largest surviving Roman arenas in the world, and is the best-preserved ancient monument in the country. The amphitheatre appears on the Croatian ten-kuna banknote.

Photograph credit: Diego Delso


March 2

Les Troyens

Les Troyens (The Trojans) is a French grand opera in five acts by Hector Berlioz, with a libretto written by the composer himself based on Virgil's Aeneid. The score was composed between 1856 and 1858, but Berlioz did not live long enough to see the work performed in its entirety. The first two acts were performed separately under the title La Prise de Troie. This picture shows the cover of the first-edition vocal score for La Prise de Troie, published in 1863.

Illustration credit: Antoine Barbizet; restored by Adam Cuerden

Recently featured:

March 3

Female hardhead
Male hardhead

The hardhead (Aythya australis) is a species of diving duck found in Australia. Also known as the white-eyed duck, its plumage is chocolate brown in both sexes, but only males have the distinctive white eye. The common name "hardhead" has nothing to do with the density of the bird's skull, instead referring to the difficulty encountered by early taxidermists in processing the head. These female (top) and male (bottom) hardheads were photographed at Hurstville Golf Course in Mortdale, New South Wales.

Photograph credit: John Harrison

Recently featured:

March 4

Coat of arms of Vermont

Vermont is a state in the northeastern part of the United States.

This picture shows Vermont's historical coat of arms, as illustrated by American engraver Henry Mitchell in State Arms of the Union, published in 1876 by Louis Prang. The escutcheon depicts a green landscape, beyond which are high mountains and a yellowish sky; in the center grows a pine tree, between three erect yellow sheaves and a red cow.

Illustration credit: Henry Mitchell; restored by Andrew Shiva

Recently featured:

March 5

Lansdowne Heracles

The Lansdowne Heracles is a Roman marble sculpture dating to about 125 CE. It represents the hero Heracles as a beardless youth grasping the skin of the Nemean lion with his club upon his shoulder. The statue was discovered in 1790 on the site of Hadrian's Villa in Tivoli, Italy. It is in the collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum's Getty Villa in Malibu, California.

Author unknown


March 6

Palais Galliera

The Palais Galliera, formally known as the Musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris, is a museum of fashion and fashion history located at 10, avenue Pierre 1er de Serbie, in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, France. Following the death of her husband in 1876, the Duchess of Galliera gave land and funds for the erection of a museum to house his collection of paintings and fine art that she proposed to give to the state. The building was completed in 1894, but the collections were in fact donated to Genoa, Italy,

Photograph credit: Joe deSousa


March 7

Mieke Wijaya

Mieke Wijaya (born 7 March 1940) is an Indonesian actress who has won three Citra Awards. Seen here in around 1960, she rose to fame as one of the stars in Perfini's musical comedy film Tiga Dara. Her fifty-year career included performing as part of a stage drama troupe in the 1960s while continuing to act in films, but by the 1990s, she was mostly concentrating on television roles.

Photograph credit: Tati Photo Studio, Mangga Besar, Jakarta; restored by Chris Woodrich


March 8

Henry Mayer (cartoonist)

The Awakening is a cartoon by Henry Mayer which first appeared in Puck Magazine in February 1915. It depicts Lady Liberty, wearing a cape labeled "Votes for Women," standing astride the states (colored white) that had adopted Women's suffrage. A poem by Alice Duer Miller is printed beneath.

Cartoon credit: Henry Mayer; restored by Adam Cuerden


March 9

Philippe Chaperon

Philippe Chaperon was a French painter and scenic designer, particularly known for his work at the Paris Opera. Seen here is his set design for act "IV" (III as normally counted) of Giuseppe Verdi's Rigoletto as used for a production by the Théâtre national de l'Opéra at the Palais Garnier that opened on 27 February 1885.

Design credit: Philippe Chaperon; restored by Adam Cuerden


March 10

Scarlet myzomela

The scarlet myzomela (Myzomela sanguinolenta) is a small bird of the honeyeater family Meliphagidae. At about 10 cm (4 in) long, it is the smallest honeyeater in Australia. It has a short tail and relatively long down-curved bill; the male is a striking bright red with black wings, while the female is entirely brown. The bird is more vocal than most honeyeaters, and a variety of calls have been recorded, including a bell-like tinkling.

Photograph credit: JJ Harrison


March 11

Bridal Procession on the Hardangerfjord

Bridal Procession on the Hardangerfjord is an 1848 painting by Hans Gude and Adolph Tidemand. Gude painted the Norwegian landscape and Tidemand the bridal party. In the first boat, the groom can be seen tipping his hat, and the bride wears her bridal crown. The boat crew is dressed in typical Bunad costumes, and other boats with guests can be seen in the distance.

Painting credit: Hans Gude and Adolph Tidemand


March 12

Fractional currency

Fractional currency, also referred to as shinplasters, was introduced by the United States federal government following the outbreak of the Civil War. These low-denomination banknotes of the United States dollar were in use between 21 August 1862 and 15 February 1876, and issued in 3, 5, 10, 15, 25, and 50 cent denominations across five issuing periods.

The 4th issue had additional anti-counterfeiting measures in the form of watermarked paper, the embedding of large silk fibers, and blue tinted end paper. This 10 cent note depicts a bust of Liberty on the obverse.

See other denominations: 15 cent, 25 cent, 50 cent, 50 cent, 50 cent, 10 cent, 25 cent, 50 cent

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (courtesy of the National Numismatic Collection, National Museum of American History)

Fractional currency

Fractional currency, also referred to as shinplasters, was introduced by the United States federal government following the outbreak of the Civil War. These low-denomination banknotes of the United States dollar were in use between 21 August 1862 and 15 February 1876, and issued in 3, 5, 10, 15, 25, and 50 cent denominations across five issuing periods.

The 4th issue had additional anti-counterfeiting measures in the form of watermarked paper, the embedding of large silk fibers, and blue tinted end paper. This 15 cent note depicts a bust of Columbia on the obverse.


See other denominations: 10 cent, 25 cent, 50 cent, 50 cent, 50 cent, 10 cent, 25 cent, 50 cent

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (courtesy of the National Numismatic Collection, National Museum of American History)

Fractional currency

Fractional currency, also referred to as shinplasters, was introduced by the United States federal government following the outbreak of the Civil War. These low-denomination banknotes of the United States dollar were in use between 21 August 1862 and 15 February 1876, and issued in 3, 5, 10, 15, 25, and 50 cent denominations across five issuing periods.

The 4th issue had additional anti-counterfeiting measures in the form of watermarked paper, the embedding of large silk fibers, and blue tinted end paper. This 25 cent note depicts George Washington on the obverse.

See other denominations: 10 cent, 15 cent, 50 cent, 50 cent, 50 cent, 10 cent, 25 cent, 50 cent

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (courtesy of the National Numismatic Collection, National Museum of American History)

Fractional currency

Fractional currency, also referred to as shinplasters, was introduced by the United States federal government following the outbreak of the Civil War. These low-denomination banknotes of the United States dollar were in use between 21 August 1862 and 15 February 1876, and issued in 3, 5, 10, 15, 25, and 50 cent denominations across five issuing periods.

The 4th issue had additional anti-counterfeiting measures in the form of watermarked paper, the embedding of large silk fibers, and blue tinted end paper. This 50 cent note depicts Abraham Lincoln on the obverse.

See other denominations: 10 cent, 15 cent, 25 cent, 50 cent, 50 cent, 10 cent, 25 cent, 50 cent

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (courtesy of the National Numismatic Collection, National Museum of American History)

Fractional currency

Fractional currency, also referred to as shinplasters, was introduced by the United States federal government following the outbreak of the Civil War. These low-denomination banknotes of the United States dollar were in use between 21 August 1862 and 15 February 1876, and issued in 3, 5, 10, 15, 25, and 50 cent denominations across five issuing periods.

The 4th issue had additional anti-counterfeiting measures in the form of watermarked paper, the embedding of large silk fibers, and blue tinted end paper. This 50 cent note depicts Edwin Stanton on the obverse.

See other denominations: 10 cent, 15 cent, 25 cent, 50 cent, 50 cent, 10 cent, 25 cent, 50 cent

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (courtesy of the National Numismatic Collection, National Museum of American History)

Fractional currency

Fractional currency, also referred to as shinplasters, was introduced by the United States federal government following the outbreak of the Civil War. These low-denomination banknotes of the United States dollar were in use between 21 August 1862 and 15 February 1876, and issued in 3, 5, 10, 15, 25, and 50 cent denominations across five issuing periods.

The 4th issue had additional anti-counterfeiting measures in the form of watermarked paper, the embedding of large silk fibers, and blue tinted end paper. This 50 cent note depicts Samuel Dexter on the obverse.

See other denominations: 10 cent, 15 cent, 25 cent, 50 cent, 50 cent, 10 cent, 25 cent, 50 cent

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (courtesy of the National Numismatic Collection, National Museum of American History)

Fractional currency

Fractional currency, also referred to as shinplasters, was introduced by the United States federal government following the outbreak of the Civil War. These low-denomination banknotes of the United States dollar were in use between 21 August 1862 and 15 February 1876, and issued in 3, 5, 10, 15, 25, and 50 cent denominations across five issuing periods.

The 5th issue had additional anti-counterfeiting measures in the form of the embedding of large silk fibers in the paper and blue tinted end paper. This 10 cent note depicts William M. Meredith on the obverse.

See other denominations: 10 cent, 15 cent, 25 cent, 50 cent, 50 cent, 50 cent, 25 cent, 50 cent

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (courtesy of the National Numismatic Collection, National Museum of American History)

Fractional currency

Fractional currency, also referred to as shinplasters, was introduced by the United States federal government following the outbreak of the Civil War. These low-denomination banknotes of the United States dollar were in use between 21 August 1862 and 15 February 1876, and issued in 3, 5, 10, 15, 25, and 50 cent denominations across five issuing periods.

The 5th issue had additional anti-counterfeiting measures in the form of the embedding of large silk fibers in the paper and blue tinted end paper. This 25 cent note depicts Robert J. Walker on the obverse.

See other denominations: 10 cent, 15 cent, 25 cent, 50 cent, 50 cent, 50 cent, 10 cent, 50 cent

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (courtesy of the National Numismatic Collection, National Museum of American History)

Fractional currency

Fractional currency, also referred to as shinplasters, was introduced by the United States federal government following the outbreak of the Civil War. These low-denomination banknotes of the United States dollar were in use between 21 August 1862 and 15 February 1876, and issued in 3, 5, 10, 15, 25, and 50 cent denominations across five issuing periods.

The 5th issue had additional anti-counterfeiting measures in the form of the embedding of large silk fibers in the paper and blue tinted end paper. This 50 cent note depicts William H. Crawford on the obverse.

See other denominations: 10 cent, 15 cent, 25 cent, 50 cent, 50 cent, 50 cent, 10 cent, 25 cent

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (courtesy of the National Numismatic Collection, National Museum of American History)


March 13

Sālote Tupou III

Sālote Tupou III (13 March 1900 – 16 December 1965) was the first queen regnant and the third monarch of the Kingdom of Tonga, from 1918 until her death in 1965.

Unknown photographer; restored by Adam Cuerden


March 14

Pope Pius VII

Pope Pius VII (1742 – 1823) was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 14 March 1800 to his death in 1823. In this 1819 portrait by Thomas Lawrence he is shown seated on the papal throne wearing a camauro on his head, a red mozzetta, a lace-trimmed rochet, a white soutane and red papal slippers. The picture is in the collection of the British royal family.

Painting credit: Thomas Lawrence


March 15

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845) was an American soldier and statesman who served as the seventh President of the United States from 1829 to 1837.

Credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


March 16

Saint Petersburg

Saint Petersburg is situated at the head of the Gulf of Finland on the Baltic Sea, and is the second-largest city in Russia. This photograph shows the Old Saint Petersburg Stock Exchange and Rostral Columns, built in Greek revival style in the first decade of the nineteenth century, on a spit on Vasilyevsky Island, surrounded by the Neva River.

Photograph credit: A.Savin


March 17

Eutropis macularia

The bronze grass skink is a species of lizard in the family Scincidae, native to South and Southeast Asia.

Photograph credit: Basile Morin


March 18

Presidencies of Grover Cleveland

Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was an American politician and lawyer who was the 22nd and 24th president of the United States, the only president in American history to serve two non-consecutive terms in office (1885–1889 and 1893–1897).

Credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


March 19

Francis B. Spinola

Francis B. Spinola (March 19, 1821 – April 14, 1891)

Portrait: Bureau of Engraving and Printing. Restoration: Godot13


March 20

Emily Carr

Emily Carr (1871–1945) was a Canadian artist and writer, one of the first painters in Canada to adopt a Modernist and Post-Impressionist style. She received widespread recognition for her work when she changed from Aboriginal themes to landscapes. Shown here is her 1939 painting Odds and Ends, depicting cleared land and tree stumps, revealing the impact of deforestation on British Columbia. The painting is held by the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria.

Painting credit: Emily Carr


March 21

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.

In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.


March 22

Abolhassan Banisadr

Abolhassan Banisadr

Photograph: Christoph Braun

Recently featured:

March 23

Roger B. Chaffee

Roger B. Chaffee at a console in the Mission Control Center, Houston, during the Gemini 3 flight on 23 March 1965.

Photograph credit: NASA

Recently featured:

March 24

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.

In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.


March 25

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.

In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.


March 26

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.

In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.


March 27

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.

In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.


March 28

Birds' Head Haggadah

The Birds' Head Haggadah (c. 1300) is the oldest surviving illuminated Ashkenazi Passover Haggadah. The manuscript, produced in the Upper Rhine region of Southern Germany in the early 14th century, contains the full Hebrew text of the Haggadah, a ritual text recounting the story of Passover – the liberation of the Israelites from slavery in ancient Egypt – which is recited by participants at a Passover Seder. Numerous theories have been advanced to explain the unusual iconography, usually tied to Jewish aniconism.

Manuscript credit: Israel Museum, previously owned by Ludwig Marum

Recently featured:

March 29

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.

In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.


March 30

Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh (30 March 1853 – 29 July 1890) was a Dutch Post-Impressionist painter and one of the most famous and influential figures in the history of Western art. In just over a decade, he created about 2,100 artworks, including around 860 oil paintings, most of which date from the last two years of his life. As his work developed, he painted such subjects as still lifes, peasant labourers, landscapes, olive trees, wheat fields, and sunflowers, using increasingly brighter colours over time. Van Gogh sold few paintings during his lifetime, and was contemporaneously considered a madman and a failure. However, he has attained widespread critical and popular acclaim since the early 20th century, and his works are among the world's most expensive paintings.

This picture is a self-portrait painted by Van Gogh with oil on canvas in September 1889. One of his several self-portraits, it may have been his last, produced shortly before he left Saint-Rémy-de-Provence in southern France. The work is now in the collection of the Musée d'Orsay in Paris.

Painting credit: Vincent van Gogh

Recently featured:

March 31

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.

In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.


Picture of the day archives

2004
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2005
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2006
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2007
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2008
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2009
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2010
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2011
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2012
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2013
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2014
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2015
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2016
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2017
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2018
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2019
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2020
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2021
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2022
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December