Wikipedia:Picture of the day/September 2020

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These featured pictures, as scheduled below, have been chosen to appear as the picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page. Individual sections for each day on this page can be linked to with the day number as the anchor name (e.g. [[Wikipedia:Picture of the day/September 2020#1]] for September 1).

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


September 1

Among the Sierra Nevada, California: a painting by Albert Bierstat

Albert Bierstadt (1830–1902) was a German-American painter best known for his lavish, sweeping landscapes of the American West, such as this oil-on-canvas painting, entitled Among the Sierra Nevada, California, created in 1868. He painted the landscape in his Rome studio, and exhibited it in Berlin and London before shipping it to the United States. His choice of grandiose subjects was matched by his entrepreneurial flair; his exhibitions of individual works were accompanied by promotion, ticket sales, and, in the words of one critic, a "vast machinery of advertisement and puffery". This work is in the collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Painting credit: Albert Bierstadt


September 2

Intaglio

Intaglio is a printing and printmaking technique in which an image is incised into a surface, with the resulting incised lines and sunken areas holding ink. It is the direct opposite of relief printing, in which the parts of the matrix that make the image project from the main surface. The intaglio process probably originated in Germany in the 15th century, and came to be used for many mass-printed materials. Nowadays, intaglio engraving is mostly used for paper currency, passports, and occasionally high-value postage stamps. This macro photograph is of an 18.1 mm × 13.5 mm (0.71 in × 0.53 in) section of a Hungarian 1,000-forint banknote, depicting intaglio printing on the face of King Matthias Corvinus.

Photograph credit: Petar Milošević


September 3

Craigdarroch Castle

Craigdarroch Castle is a historic Victorian-era mansion in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, built in the Scottish-baronial style in the late 1800s. The wealthy coal baron Robert Dunsmuir intended it as a family residence, but died before it was completed. His widow sold the Craigdarroch estate to a speculator, who subdivided the land into building lots. To stimulate sales during a slow real-estate market, he announced that the home would be the subject of a raffle, to be won by one of the purchasers. The winner mortgaged the house to finance speculative ventures, and when these failed, the ownership passed to the Bank of Montreal in 1919. The house was used in 2015 as the filming location for The Boy, a horror movie.

Photograph credit: Michal Klajban

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September 4

Tibia insulaechorab

Tibia insulaechorab, the Arabian tibia, is a species of gastropod mollusc in the family Rostellariidae, native to the western Indian Ocean. It was first described by the German malacologist Peter Friedrich Röding in 1798, the type locality being the Red Sea. He included it in the family Strombidae, but this large family was later split and the genus Tibia was transferred to the family Rostellariidae.

This photograph shows a dorsal view of a T. insulaechorab shell. Growing up to 20 cm (8 in) long, including the elongated siphonal canal, it is highly sought after by collectors because of its attractive appearance.

Photograph credit: Hans Hillewaert


September 5

John G. Carlisle

John G. Carlisle (September 5, 1834 – July 31, 1910) was an American politician from the commonwealth of Kentucky and was a member of the Democratic Party. He was elected to the United States House of Representatives seven times, and served as Speaker of the House from 1883 to 1889. He subsequently served as a U.S. senator from Kentucky from 1890 to 1893, and then as Secretary of the Treasury from 1893 to 1897, during a serious economic depression.

This picture is a line engraving of Carlisle, produced around 1902 by the Department of the Treasury's Bureau of Engraving and Printing, as part of a presentation album of the first 42 secretaries of the treasury.

Engraving credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


September 6

Catherine Brass Yates

Catherine Brass Yates is an oil-on-canvas painting created in 1793–1794 by American artist Gilbert Stuart. The work depicts Yates, the wife of a New York merchant, with her bony face and appraising glance, as too busy with her sewing to take time off to pose for the artist. The fabrics, skin tones and sewing implements are illustrated using a variety of thick, thin, opaque and translucent oil paints, and a meticulous attention to detail. The subject wears a mobcap, a round, gathered or pleated cloth, to cover her hair. This was an indoor fashion item of the period, and would have been worn under a hat for outdoor wear. The painting was acquired in 1940 by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., where it hangs today.

Painting credit: Gilbert Stuart


September 7

Aerial view of the Tauride Palace
Front view of the Tauride Palace

The Tauride Palace is one of the largest and most historic palaces in Saint Petersburg, Russia. It was designed by Ivan Starov for Prince Grigory Potemkin, and was constructed between 1783 and 1789. After the owner's death, it was purchased by Catherine the Great, who constructed a theatre in the east wing and a church in the west wing. Many improvements were also made to the grounds, including construction of the Admiralty Pavilion, the gardener house, the orangery, glass-houses, bridges, and ironwork fences. Although the exterior of the building was rather plain, the interior was very luxurious. More recently, the building housed the first Imperial State Duma (1906–1917) and the post-revolution provisional government.

Photograph credit: Andrew Shiva


September 8

Peter Martyr Vermigli

Peter Martyr Vermigli (8 September 1499 – 12 November 1562) was an Italian theologian. Born in Florence, he entered a Catholic religious order, but through study he came to accept Protestant beliefs about salvation and the Eucharist, and, to satisfy his conscience and avoid persecution by the Roman Inquisition, he fled Italy for Protestant northern Europe. The Latin inscription in this 1560 oil-on-canvas portrait of Vermigli by Hans Asper translates to: "Florence brought him forth, now he wanders as a foreigner, that he might forever be a citizen among those in heaven. This is his likeness, but a painting cannot reveal his heart, for integrity and piety cannot be represented by art." The painting is now in the collection of the National Portrait Gallery in London.

Painting credit: Hans Asper


September 9

Coat of arms of California

This historical depiction of the coat of arms of California was illustrated by American engraver Henry Mitchell in State Arms of the Union, published in 1876 by Louis Prang. A state in the Pacific region of the U.S., California was admitted into the Union on September 9, 1850. The escutcheon depicts the goddess Minerva, representing the political birth of the state, seated underneath the state motto Eureka. At her feet crouches a grizzly bear, feeding upon bunches of grapes that, with the plough and sheaf of wheat on the right, are emblematic of the state's bounty. On the left, a miner at work, with a rocker and bowl at his side, illustrates the golden wealth of the land, while the snow-clad peaks of the Sierra Nevada and shipping on the Sacramento River make up the background. A similar design appears on the current Great Seal of California.

Illustration credit: Henry Mitchell; restored by Andrew Shiva


September 10

Nicholas Lanier

Nicholas Lanier (baptised 10 September 1588 – buried 24 February 1666) was an English composer and musician; the first to hold the title of Master of the King's Music, in the service of Charles I and Charles II. He was one of the first composers to introduce monody and recitative to England.

After this oil-on-canvas portrait was painted by the Flemish painter Anthony van Dyck in Antwerp, Lanier convinced the king to bring van Dyck to England, where he became the leading court painter. The portrait displays an attitude of studied carelessness, often termed sprezzatura, defined as "a certain nonchalance, so as to conceal all art and make whatever one does or says appear to be without effort and almost without any thought about it". The painting now hangs in the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna.

Painting credit: Anthony van Dyck


September 11

Masih Alinejad

Masih Alinejad (born 11 September 1976) is an Iranian journalist, author, political activist, and women's-rights activist. She currently lives in the United States where she works as a presenter and producer at the Voice of America Persian News Network, a correspondent for Radio Farda, a frequent contributor to Manoto television, and a contributing editor to IranWire. This photograph was taken in 2018, the year when she published her memoir, The Wind in My Hair, dealing with her journey from a tiny village in northern Iran to becoming a journalist and creating an online movement that sparked nationwide protests against the compulsory wearing of hijab.

Photograph credit: Kambiz Foroohar


September 12

Spotted hyena

The spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) is the largest member of the hyena family, Hyaenidae; it can be distinguished from related species by its vaguely bear-like build, rounded ears, less prominent mane and spotted pelt. Native to sub-Saharan Africa, it is the most social of the Carnivora in having the largest group sizes and most complex social behaviours. Although the species suffers from habitat loss and poaching, its wide distribution and large total population has led to it being assessed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as being of least concern. This spotted hyena was photographed in Etosha National Park, Namibia.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


September 13

Nogi Maresuke

Nogi Maresuke (25 December 1849 – 13 September 1912) was a general in the Imperial Japanese Army and a governor-general of Taiwan. His career included action in the Satsuma Rebellion and the First Sino-Japanese War. He was recalled to active service in the Russo-Japanese War, and made a report directly to Emperor Meiji during a Gozen Kaigi at the end of the war. When explaining battles during the Siege of Port Arthur in detail, he broke down and wept, apologizing for the 56,000 lives lost in the campaign and asking to be allowed to kill himself in atonement. The emperor told him that suicide was unacceptable, as all responsibility for the war was due to imperial orders, and that Nogi must remain alive, at least as long as he himself lived. Emperor Meiji died in 1912, and Nogi and his wife Shizuko committed suicide shortly after the funeral cortège left the palace.

Photograph credit: unknown; restored by Adam Cuerden


September 14

Portrait of the Duke of Wellington

The Portrait of the Duke of Wellington is an oil-on-panel painting by the Spanish artist Francisco Goya. It depicts the British general Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, during his service in the Peninsular War. It was begun in August 1812, after his entry into Madrid, depicting him as an earl, in uniform and wearing the Peninsular Medal. Goya then modified it in 1814, adding the Order of the Golden Fleece and Military Gold Cross with three clasps (both of which Wellington had been awarded in the interim). In this portrait, probably painted from life, the duke's face is gaunt and exhausted from battle, contrasting with the bright crimson military uniform he wears. The painting now hangs in the National Gallery in London.

Painting credit: Francisco Goya


September 15

Macrotyloma uniflorum

Macrotyloma uniflorum, commonly known as horse gram, is a legume native to tropical southern Asia. The plant grows from a rhizome, sending up annual shoots to a height of 60 cm (24 in). The flowers are cream, yellow or pale green and are followed by short pods. The seeds, pictured here, have been consumed in India for at least 4,000 years and are used both for animal feed and human consumption, including Ayurvedic cuisine. In other tropical countries in southeastern Asia, and in northern Australia, the plant is grown mainly as a fodder crop and for use as green manure. It is a drought-tolerant plant, largely cultivated in areas with low rainfall.

Photograph credit: Prathyush Thomas


September 16

Graziella

Graziella is an 1852 novel by the French author Alphonse de Lamartine. It tells of a young French man who falls in love with the eponymous character, a fisherman's granddaughter, during a trip to Naples, Italy; they are separated when he must return to France, and Graziella dies soon afterwards. The novel received popular acclaim; an operatic adaptation had been completed by the end of the year, and the work influenced paintings, poems, novels, and films. This 1878 oil-on-canvas painting by the French artist Jules Joseph Lefebvre shows Graziella sitting on a rock, fishing net in hand, gazing over her shoulder at a smoking Mount Vesuvius in the distance. The painting is now in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Painting credit: Jules Joseph Lefebvre


September 17

Microorganism

Microorganisms include all unicellular organisms and so are extremely diverse, living in almost every habitat, with some adapted to extremes such as very hot or very cold conditions, others to high pressure, and a few, such as Deinococcus radiodurans, which are adapted to high-radiation environments. Microorganisms also make up the microbiota found in and on all multicellular organisms. There is evidence that 3.45-billion-year-old Australian rocks once contained microorganisms, the earliest direct evidence of life on Earth. Microbes are important in human culture and health in many ways, serving to ferment foods and treat sewage, and to produce fuel, enzymes, and other bioactive compounds. This low-temperature electron micrograph shows a cluster of E. coli bacteria, magnified 10,000 times.

Photograph credit: Eric Erbe; colorized by Christopher Pooley


September 18

Mount Stuart House

Mount Stuart House is a country house built in the Gothic Revival style situated on the east coast of the Isle of Bute, Scotland. It is the ancestral home of the Marquesses of Bute. The original house was constructed by Alexander McGill in 1719, but was redesigned by Sir Robert Rowand Anderson and rebuilt for the 3rd Marquess following a fire on 3 December 1877. It is built from reddish-brown stone; major features include the colonnaded Marble Hall at the centre of the main block, and the Marble Chapel with its elaborate spired tower. It was the first home in Scotland to be lit by electricity and claims to have been the first to have an indoor heated pool.

Photograph credit: Colin


September 19

James A. Garfield

James A. Garfield (November 19, 1831 – September 19, 1881) was the 20th president of the United States, serving from March 4, 1881, until his death by assassination six and a half months later. He had been shot at the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Station in Washington, D.C., on July 2 that year by Charles J. Guiteau, a disgruntled office seeker. According to some historians, Garfield might have survived his wounds had the doctors attending him had at their disposal today's medical research and techniques. Instead, they probed the wound with unsterilized fingers and equipment, trying to locate the bullet, and the resulting infection was a significant factor in his death.

This picture is a line engraving of Garfield, produced around 1902 by the Department of the Treasury's Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) as part of a BEP presentation album of the first 26 presidents, which was reportedly given to Treasury Secretary Lyman J. Gage.

Credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


September 20

Marriage A-la-Mode: 6. The Lady's Death

The Lady's Death is the last of a series of six oil-on-canvas paintings by English painter and pictorial satirist William Hogarth, created around 1743. The series, entitled Marriage A-la-Mode, depicts an arranged marriage and its disastrous consequences in a satire of 18th-century society, and is now in the collection of the National Gallery in London.

In this painting, the countess has poisoned herself in her grief and poverty-stricken widowhood after her lover is hanged at Tyburn for murdering her husband. An old woman carrying the countess's infant daughter allows her to give her mother a kiss, but the mark on the child's cheek and the caliper on her leg suggest that syphilis has been passed on to the next generation. The countess's father, whose miserly lifestyle is evident in the bare house, removes the wedding ring from her finger.

Painting credit: William Hogarth


September 21

Portrait of Dürer's Father at 70

Portrait of Dürer's Father at 70 is an oil-on-linden-panel painting attributed to the German painter and printmaker Albrecht Dürer. Although a master goldsmith and well travelled, Albrecht Dürer the Elder, the painter's father, lived in poverty all his life. With his much younger wife, he fathered 17 children, of whom only two reached adulthood. He was supportive of his son's precocious talent and sent him to an apprenticeship with Michael Wolgemut, one of the most highly regarded painters in Nuremberg at the time. This portrait was painted in 1497, on his son's return, but whether it is the original work, or one of several copies done in the artist's workshop, is unclear. The painting currently hangs at the National Gallery, London.

Painting credit: Albrecht Dürer (attributed)


September 22

Autumn

Autumn is one of the four temperate seasons, marking the transition from summer to winter. In North America, where it is known as fall, the season traditionally starts on the September equinox (21 to 24 September) and ends on the winter solstice (21 or 22 December). Meteorologists in the Northern Hemisphere use a definition based on Gregorian calendar months, with autumn being September, October, and November. In Southern Hemisphere countries such as Australia and New Zealand, which also base their seasonal calendars meteorologically rather than astronomically, autumn officially begins on 1 March and ends on 31 May.

This photograph shows a typical autumnal scene in Dülmen, Germany, with the shedding of yellow, orange and red leaves by deciduous trees in temperate climates. The September equinox falls at 13:31 UTC on 22 September in 2020.

Photograph credit: Dietmar Rabich; retouched by Eric Gaba


September 23

Bothrops bilineatus

Bothrops bilineatus is a highly venomous species of pit viper found in the Amazon region of South America. A pale green arboreal species that may reach 1 m (3.3 ft) in length, it is an important cause of snakebite throughout the entire Amazon region. It is a nocturnal species, spending the day hidden in dense vegetation in lowland rainforest, usually in the vicinity of water. It emerges at night to feed on small mammals, birds, lizards and frogs, tending to rely on ambush rather than actively hunting for prey. This B. bilineatus individual was photographed in an Atlantic Forest preservation area in the state of Bahia in eastern Brazil.

Photograph credit: Renato Augusto Martins


September 24

Siena Cathedral

Siena Cathedral, a medieval church in Siena, Italy, dedicated to the Assumption of Mary, was designed and completed between 1215 and 1263. It has the form of a Latin cross with a slightly projecting transept, a dome and a bell tower. The dome rises from a hexagonal base with supporting columns and was completed in 1264. This photograph shows the interior of the dome; the gilded lantern at the top was added by Gian Lorenzo Bernini and resembles a golden sun. The trompe-l'œil coffers were painted in blue with golden stars in the late 15th century. The colonnade in the drum is adorned with images and statues of 42 patriarchs and prophets, painted in 1481 by Guidoccio Cozzarelli and Benvenuto di Giovanni.

Photograph credit: Livioandronico2013


September 25

Climate of Mars

Although Mars is smaller than the Earth and 50 percent farther from the Sun, its climate has important similarities with the Earth, such as the presence of polar ice caps, seasonal changes and observable weather patterns. This image shows layered deposits in Planum Boreum, in the north polar region of Mars, which formed from a 3-kilometre-thick (2 mi) stack of dusty water-ice layers about 1,000 km (600 mi) across. The layers record information about the climate of the planet stretching back several million years. Erosion has created scarps and troughs that expose the layering. The tan-colored layers are the dusty water ice of the polar layered deposits, however a section of bluish layers is visible below them. These bluish layers contain sand-sized rock fragments that likely formed a large polar dunefield before the overlying dusty ice was deposited. This photograph, depicting an area approximately 1.3 km (0.8 mi) across, was captured by the HiRISE camera on board NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Photograph credit: NASA / JPLCaltech / University of Arizona


September 26

Bessie Smith

Bessie Smith (April 15, 1894 – September 26, 1937) was an American blues singer widely renowned during the Jazz Age. She is often regarded as one of the greatest singers of her era and was a major influence on fellow blues singers, as well as jazz vocalists.

Born in Chattanooga, Tennessee, her parents died when Smith was young, and she and her sister survived by performing on the streets of Chattanooga, Tennessee. She began touring and performed in a group that included Ma Rainey, and then went out on her own. Her successful recording career began in the 1920s, until an automobile accident ended her life at age 43.

Photograph credit: Carl Van Vechten; restored by Adam Cuerden


September 27

Pomegranate juice

Pomegranate juice is a beverage made from the fruit of the pomegranate. It is used in cooking both as a fresh juice and as a concentrated syrup. The fruit originated in the region extending from Iran to northern India and has been cultivated since ancient times. The fruit has a hard outer husk and a spongy mesocarp in which the seeds in their fleshy seedcoats are embedded. Pomegranate juice can be sweet or sour, but most fruits are moderate in taste. The juice has long been a popular drink in Europe and the Middle East, and is now widely distributed in the United States and Canada.

Photograph credit: Augustus Binu


September 28

Chosen at random from a selection of eleven; all alternatives shown below

Silver certificate

Silver certificates are a type of representative money issued between 1878 and 1964 in the United States as part of its circulation of paper currency. This $1 silver certificate, part of the series of 1886, depicts Martha Washington; the wife of the first president is the only woman (other than vignettes representing Liberty and Justice) depicted on United States banknotes from the federal issuing period (1861 to the present). The series is known for the ornate engraving on the reverse of the notes. This banknote is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Banknote design credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Silver certificate

Silver certificates are a type of representative money issued between 1878 and 1964 in the United States as part of its circulation of paper currency. This $2 silver certificate, part of the series of 1886, depicts Winfield Scott Hancock, a United States Army officer and the Democratic nominee for president in 1880. The series is known for the ornate engraving on the reverse of the notes. This banknote is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Banknote design credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Silver certificate

Silver certificates are a type of representative money issued between 1878 and 1964 in the United States as part of its circulation of paper currency. This $5 silver certificate, part of the series of 1886, depicts Ulysses S. Grant, an American soldier and politician who served as the 18th president of the United States from 1869 to 1877. The series is known for the ornate engraving on the reverse of the notes. This banknote is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Banknote design credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Silver certificate

Silver certificates are a type of representative money issued between 1878 and 1964 in the United States as part of its circulation of paper currency. This $10 silver certificate, part of the series of 1886, depicts Thomas A. Hendricks, an American politician and lawyer from Indiana who served as the 21st vice president of the United States from March to November 1885. The series is known for the ornate engraving on the reverse of the notes. This banknote is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Banknote design credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Silver certificate

Silver certificates are a type of representative money issued between 1878 and 1964 in the United States as part of its circulation of paper currency. This $20 silver certificate, part of the series of 1886, depicts Daniel Manning, an American businessman, journalist, and politician most notable for having served as the 37th secretary of the treasury. The series is known for the ornate engraving on the reverse of the notes. This banknote is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Banknote design credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Silver certificate

Silver certificates are a type of representative money issued between 1878 and 1964 in the United States as part of its circulation of paper currency. This $10 silver certificate, part of the series of 1878, depicts Robert Morris, a Founding Father who served as Superintendent of Finance from 1781 to 1784. The series is known for the ornate engraving on the reverse of the notes. This banknote is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Banknote design credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Silver certificate

Silver certificates are a type of representative money issued between 1878 and 1964 in the United States as part of its circulation of paper currency. This $20 silver certificate, part of the series of 1878, depicts Stephen Decatur, a United States naval officer and commodore who became a national hero after his numerous naval victories. The series is known for the ornate engraving on the reverse of the notes. This banknote is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Banknote design credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Silver certificate

Silver certificates are a type of representative money issued between 1878 and 1964 in the United States as part of its circulation of paper currency. This $50 silver certificate, part of the series of 1878, depicts Edward Everett, an American politician, pastor, educator, diplomat, and orator from Massachusetts who served as Secretary of State from 1852 to 1853. The series is known for the ornate engraving on the reverse of the notes. This banknote is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Silver certificate

Silver certificates are a type of representative money issued between 1878 and 1964 in the United States as part of its circulation of paper currency. This $100 silver certificate, part of the series of 1878, depicts James Monroe, an American statesman, lawyer, diplomat and Founding Father who served as the fifth president of the United States from 1817 to 1825. The series is known for the ornate engraving on the reverse of the notes. This banknote is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Banknote design credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Silver certificate

Silver certificates are a type of representative money issued between 1878 and 1964 in the United States as part of its circulation of paper currency. This $500 silver certificate, part of the series of 1878, depicts Charles Sumner, an American lawyer, politician and United States senator from Massachusetts. The series is known for the ornate engraving on the reverse of the notes. This banknote is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Banknote design credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; photographed by Andrew Shiva

Silver certificate

Silver certificates are a type of representative money issued between 1878 and 1964 in the United States as part of its circulation of paper currency. This $1000 silver certificate, part of the series of 1878, depicts William L. Marcy, an American lawyer and politician, who served as Secretary of State from 1853 to 1857. The series is known for the ornate engraving on the reverse of the notes. This banknote is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Other denominations:

Banknote design credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; photographed by Andrew Shiva


September 29

Jacob Cornelisz van Oostsanen

Jacob Cornelisz van Oostsanen (before 1470 – 1533) was a Northern Netherlandish painter and designer of woodcuts. This oil-on-panel painting, by his son Dirck Jacobsz., depicts Van Oostsanen painting a portrait of his wife Anna. Though Van Oostsanen had died in 1533, his wife lived until around 1550, the year in which this work was painted. Its format ingeniously incorporates the viewer in its fiction. The painter looks out, presumably at his subject, whose likeness he is depicting. The work may have been intended to serve as a memorial to Jacobsz.'s parents, to be installed above the couple's tomb in a church.

Painting credit: Dirck Jacobsz.


September 30

Long Island City

Long Island City is a residential and commercial neighborhood located on the extreme western tip of Queens, New York City, on the western edge of Long Island. Incorporated as a separate city in 1870, it was originally the seat of government of the town of Newtown before becoming part of New York City in 1898. Long Island City was once home to many factories and bakeries, some of which are finding new uses, and starting in the early 21st century, it became known for its rapid and ongoing residential growth and gentrification, its waterfront parks, and its thriving arts community. The area has a high concentration of art galleries, art institutions, and studio spaces.

Photograph credit: Tony Jin


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