Wikipedia:Recent additions 29

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This is a record of material that was recently featured on the Main Page as part of Did you know?. Recently created new articles, greatly expanded former stub articles, and recently promoted Good Articles are eligible, and you can submit them for consideration.

Archives are grouped by month of Main page appearance. To find which archive contains the fact that appeared on Did You Know?, return to the article and click "What links here" to the left of the article. Then, in the dropdown menu provided for namespace, choose Wikipedia and click "Go". When you find "Wikipedia:Recent additions" and a number, click it and search for the article name.

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Did you know...[edit]

Rubythroathummer65.jpg

...that the principles of bird flight are the same as used in aircraft, with lift being provided by an aerofoil?
...that by passing as a man, Isobel Gunn became in 1806 the first woman of European descent employed by the Hudson's Bay Company in Rupert's Land?
...that Fred Gipson was an American author best remembered for creating a fictional dog featured in a book and the classic 1957 movie Old Yeller?
...that the English politician Charles Mohun, 4th Baron Mohun fought a duel with James Douglas, 4th Duke of Hamilton in Hyde Park, London on November 15 1712 which resulted in the deaths of both men?

Bridgerivervalley West Virginia USA.jpg

...that Lover's Leap is a name given to a number of locations of great height where legends take place involving couples leaping to their mutual death?
...that French painter Adélaïde Labille-Guiard was ordered to destroy her royal portraits after the French Revolution?
...that admiral Michiel de Ruyter saved the United Provinces from invasion in the two Battles of Schooneveld in June 1673?
...that 11 of the 13 members of the Hong Kong cricket team died when their steamship, SS Bokhara, was lost in a typhoon in 1892?

...that the National Socialist Motor Corps was a motorized paramiltiary group of the Nazi Party, numbering almost 500,000 in membership?
...that Reverend Mother Superior Dolores Hart is the only nun to be an Academy Award-voting member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences?
...that the racehorse "Your Host" of Hollywood producer William Goetz won the 1950 Santa Anita Derby?
...that time discipline is the set of social and economic rules, conventions, customs, and expectations about time and its measurement?

Lava flow at Krafla, 1984.jpg

...that the Iceland hotspot is partly responsible for the frequent volcanic eruptions and geothermal activity experienced in Iceland?
...that Zara Yaqob was the first Emperor of Ethiopia (14341468) to send a diplomatic mission to Europe?
...that in Hindu mythology, Meenakshi was born with three breasts, fish-eyes and a smell of fish?
...that the composer Zbigniew Preisner wrote the title music for the monumental BBC documentary the People's Century which spans 26 parts?

Vanloo, Painting.jpg

...that French painter Charles-André van Loo was the principal court painter to Louis XV of France?
...that English explorer James Knight died on an expedition in search of the Northwest Passage in 1719?
...that Joseph Cornelius O'Rourke, an Irish Count born in Estonia, became a Russian Lieutenant General, and was honoured with a statue in Belgrade for his victory over the Ottoman Empire in 1810?
...that American golfer Tony Lema died when the plane he was travelling in crashed into a golf course?
...that the Truro murders were among the earliest serial killings in Australia?

Theatrical District, Richmond, Virginia, 1923.jpg

...that Perley A. Thomas was a Canadian millsmith who attended night courses, learned drafting and design skills, and became a renowned streetcar and bus manufacturer in High Point, North Carolina?
...that American actress Susan Oliver, after surviving a plane crash that almost ended her life, became the first woman to fly a single-engined aircraft solo from New York City across the Atlantic Ocean?
...that the Windows Template Library is perhaps the only open source library by Microsoft?
...that the two airplanes on the Bar Harbor Airlines fleet that had accidents were numbered N200WP and N300WP respectively?

Williamson School one-room school in Blanch Caswell County North Carolina.jpg

...that one-room schools were commonplace throughout rural portions of the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries? All of the students met in a single room, and one teacher taught reading, writing and arithmetic to seven or eight grade levels of boys and girls.)
...that thousands of toads in Hamburg, Germany recently became mysterious exploding toads?
...that a kid hack was a horse-drawn vehicle used for transporting children to school in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in the United States? This early form of school bus powered by both horses and mules, was usually loaded at the rear to avoid frightening the animals.
...that a remand prisoner may be entitled to wear their own clothing, rather than a prison uniform?

Madonna-usdot.jpg

...that Madonna of the Trail is a series of monuments dedicated to the spirit of the pioneer woman in the United States? Created by German immigrant sculptor August Leimbach, 12 were placed from Maryland to California in 1928 and 1929.
...that the growing of heirloom plants may help increase the genetic variety of crops?
...that the Laotian Rock Rat is a new species of rodent that is unique enough to lead researchers to create a new family of mammals?

Snowdance.jpg

...that the International Dance Day has been celebrated on April 29 since 1982? It commemorates the birthday of Jean-Georges Noverre, the creator of modern ballet.
...that George E. Studdy was a British artist best remembered for his creation of Bonzo the dog, a fictional character, in the early 1920s?
...that musical montage (montage meaning "putting together") is a technique where musical compositions or sound objects are created from collage?

TXMap-doton-Baird.PNG

...that the town of Baird, Texas, is named after the second owner of Baldwin Locomotive Works, Matthew Baird?
...that the child actor Tommy Rettig, who starred as Jeff Miller in the first four seasons of the Lassie television series became a noted database software author as an adult?
...that Skyfox was one of the first games to popularize the cockpit view for flight action games?
...that Chrissy Snow from the American sitcom Three's Company was actually named "Christmas Snow"?

Flag of the District of Columbia.svg

...that the U.S. National Arboretum, the new D.C. Convention Center, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, and Corcoran Gallery of Art are all located on or near New York Avenue in Washington, D.C.?