Wikipedia:WikiProject Australian biota/Categories

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Scope[edit]

The Flora of Australia category tree is for:

  • Taxa of the lowest rank that occur in Australia;
  • Higher rank taxa that are endemic to Australia.

Taxa that are neither endemic to Australia nor of the lowest rank should not be categorised into the Flora of Australia category tree. This approach ensures that every Australian plant is categorised, while excluding articles like Flowering plant.

Example 1
Proteaceae is neither endemic to Australia nor a taxon of the lowest rank, so it should not be classified into the Flora of Australia category tree.
Example 2
Banksia dentata is not endemic to Australia, but is a taxon of the lowest rank, so it should be classified into the Flora of Australia category tree.
Example 3
Hakea is not a taxon of the lowest rank, but it is endemic to Australia, so it should be classified into the Flora of Australia category tree

Articles on higher taxa whose lower taxa do not yet have articles should be treated as taxa of the lowest rank until articles on the lower taxa have been written:

Example 4
Avicennia marina is not endemic to Australia, and is not a taxon of the lowest rank because it has a number of subspecies. However, these subspecies articles have not yet been written. Until we have articles on the Australian subspecies, Avicennia marina may be tagged into the Flora of Australia category tree. Once the subspecies articles are written, Avicennia marina should be replaced in the Flora of Australia category tree by the relevant subspecies.

Exceptions may be made on a case-by-case basis for non-endemic taxa that are very closely associated with Australia, for example because they are very nearly endemic.

Example 5
Eucalyptus is neither endemic to Australia nor a taxon of the lowest rank, but it is so closely associated with Australia that it possibly should be tagged into the Flora of Australia category tree.

Subcategories[edit]

There are too many Australian plant taxa to be contained in a single Category:Flora of Australia. Articles should therefore be tagged into subcategories wherever possible. There are two subcategory trees. One tree categorises by Australian states and territories; the other categorises by taxonomy.

Flora by state and territory[edit]

Categorisation into the state subcategories follows the same rules as above: the state categories are for:

  1. Taxa of the lowest rank that occur in that state, irrespective of whether they also occur elsewhere;
  2. Only those higher rank taxa that are endemic in the state.

Taxa that are neither endemic in a state nor of the lowest rank should not be categorised into the state category.

Example 6
Banksia is not endemic in any particular state, nor is it a taxon of the lowest rank, so it should not be classified into any state category.
Example 7
Banksia aemula occurs in both New South Wales and Queensland. It is a taxon of the lowest rank, so it should be classified into Category:Flora of New South Wales and Category:Flora of Queensland.
Example 8
Dryandra is not a taxon of the lowest rank, but it is endemic to Western Australia, so it should be classified into the Category:Flora of Western Australia
Example 9
Banksia conferta occurs in both New South Wales and Queensland, and is not a taxon of the lowest rank because it has two subspecies. Until we have articles on these subspecies, Banksia conferta should be tagged into Category:Flora of New South Wales and Category:Flora of Queensland. Once the subspecies articles are written, Banksia conferta should be replaced in the state subcategories by the relevant subspecies.

Flora by taxonomy[edit]

Subcategorisation by taxonomy is still being developed. Subcategories for non-endemic taxa should be named according to the convention "Category:[Taxon] of Australia". Subcategories for endemic taxa can be simply named for the taxon. Articles should be placed in the lowest rank subcategory available.

Example 10
Adenanthos cygnorum should be categorised into Category:Proteales of Australia.
Example 11
If there is was need for an Adenanthos subcategory at genus level, it would be called Category:Adenanthos not Category:Adenanthos of Australia, because it is an endemic genus.

Flora by both[edit]

Once the state and taxonomy subcategories become well-populated, it may be worthwhile to introduce subcategories that cover both, such as Category:Proteales of Western Australia. Premature creation of such categories is discouraged.

Example 12
In hindsight, Category:Acacia of Western Australia should not have been created until Category:Acacia of Australia and Category:Proteales of Western Australia had been created and overpopulated.