Wikipedia:WikiProject Missing encyclopedic articles/Antarctica/C3

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Before creating a new Wikipedia-article based on the information below, please read Wikipedia:WikiProject Missing encyclopedic articles/Antarctica. Suggestions for improvement of these automatically generated texts can be done at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Missing encyclopedic articles/Antarctica

Christie Peaks[edit]

'''Christie Peaks''' ({{coor dm|71|15|S|67|25|W|}}) is a conspicuous group of sharp peaks located immediately south of the terminus of [[Ryder Glacier]] on the west coast of [[Palmer Land]]. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) for [[Timothy J.C. Christie]], [[British Antarctic Survey]] (BAS) surveyor at [[Stonington Island]], 1970-71.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Cape Christie[edit]

'''Cape Christie''' ({{coor dm|72|18|S|170|1|E|}}) is a cape situated 5 nautical miles (9 km) west-northwest of [[Cape Hallett]], marking the west side of the entrance to [[Edisto Inlet]] on the coast of [[Victoria Land]]. Discovered, [[January 15]], [[1841]], by [[Sir James Clark Ross]] and named for Professor [[Samuel Hunter Christie]], of the [[Royal Military Academy]], Woolwich.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica|Christie, Cape]]

Christine Island[edit]

'''Christine Island''' ({{coor dm|64|48|S|64|2|W|}}) is an [[island]] 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km) long which lies 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) off the south coast of [[Anvers Island]] and 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) southeast of [[Bonaparte Point]]. The name was proposed by [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) biologist [[Dietland Muller-Schwarze]] after his wife [[Christine Muller-Schwarze]], who studied [[Adelie Penguins]] with him on the island in 1971-72.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Christmas Cliffs[edit]

'''Christmas Cliffs''' ({{coor dm|73|33|S|94|17|W|}}) is a south-facing cliffs with two prominent rock outcrops, located 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) south-southeast of [[Pillsbury Tower]] in the [[Jones Mountains]]. Mapped by the University of [[Minnesota-Jones Mountains Party]], 1960-61, and so named by the party because the cliffs were visited on [[Christmas Day]], 1960.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cape Christmas[edit]

'''Cape Christmas''' ({{coor dm|72|20|S|60|41|W|}}) is an abrupt rock cape which rises to 320 m, marking the north side of the entrance to [[Wust Inlet]], on the east coast of [[Palmer Land]]. Discovered and photographed from the air in December 1940 by the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS). During 1947 it was photographed from the air by the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE) under Ronne, who in conjunction with the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) charted it from the ground. So named by the FIDS because the joint party in 1947 spent [[Christmas Day]] in this vicinity.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica|Christmas, Cape]]

Mount Christmas[edit]

'''Mount Christmas''' ({{coor dm|81|54|S|161|56|E|}}) is a uniform sharp [[peak]], 1,745 m, standing 9 nautical miles (17 km) west-southwest of [[Cape May]], in the [[Nash Range]]. Discovered by the ''Discovery'' expedition (1901-04) and so named because it was the most salient feature in view when the polar party was abreast of it on [[Christmas Day]], 1902.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Christmas, Mount]]

Christoffersen Heights[edit]

'''Christoffersen Heights''' ({{coor dm|73|36|S|93|54|W|}}) is a broad snow-covered heights which form the south-central portion of the [[Jones Mountains]], southward of Bonnabeau and [[Anderson Domes]]. Mapped by the University of [[Minnesota-Jones Mountains Party]], 1960-61. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant [[Ernest H. Christoffersen]], [[U.S. Navy Reserve]], co-pilot of ski-equipped LC-47 Dakota aircraft on pioneering flights from [[Byrd Station]] to the [[Eights Coast]] area in November 1961.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Christoffersen Island[edit]

'''Christoffersen Island''' ({{coor dm|60|44|S|45|3|W|}}) is a small [[island]] immediately west of the south end of [[Powell Island]] in the [[South Orkney Islands]]. The name appears on a chart by Norwegian whaling captain [[Petter Sorlle]], who made a running survey of these islands in 1912-13.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Christoph Nunatak[edit]

'''Christoph Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|74|49|S|73|47|W|}}) is a [[nunatak]] rising to about 1,300 m, 2.5 nautical miles (4.6 km) east-northeast of [[Holtet Nunatak]] in the [[Lyon Nunataks]], [[Ellsworth Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from [[U.S. Navy]] aerial photographs taken 1965-68 and Landsat imagery taken 1973-74. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) in 1987 after [[Klaus J. Christoph]], upper atmospheric physicist at [[Siple Station]], 1970-71.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Christy Glacier[edit]

'''Christy Glacier''' ({{coor dm|86|6|S|161|30|W|}}) is a steep tributary [[glacier]] draining southeast along the southwest side of [[Breyer Mesa]] to enter [[Amundsen Glacier]], in [[Queen Maud Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-64. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Clarence C. Christy]], maintenance shop supervisor at [[Williams Field]], [[McMurdo Sound]], on [[U.S. Navy Operation Deepfreeze]] 1967.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Chuan Peak[edit]

'''Chuan Peak''' ({{coor dm|77|29|S|168|21|E|}}) is a [[peak]], c.2200 m, located 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) northeast of [[Barker Peak]] in the south part of [[Giggenbach Ridge]], [[Ross Island]]. At the suggestion of [[P.R. Kyle]], named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) (2000) after [[Raymond L. Chuan]] who, as a scientist with the [[Brunswick Corporation]], [[Costa Mesa]], CA, undertook many airborne surveys of volcanic aerosols from [[Mount Erebus]] and also did sampling at the crater rim, 1983-84 and 1986-87; investigator (with [[Julie Palais]]) on a project which examined aerosols between Mount Erebus and the [[South Pole]].

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Chugunov Glacier[edit]

'''Chugunov Glacier''' ({{coor dm|70|43|S|163|9|E|}}) is a [[glacier]] about 15 nautical miles (28 km) long located just north of [[Astakhov Glacier]] in the [[Bowers Mountains]]. It is one of several glaciers which drain the east slopes of the [[Explorers Range]] and flow to Ob' Bay. Plotted from photographs taken by the [[Soviet Antarctic Expedition]] in 1958. Named for [[N.A. Chugunov]], Soviet aerologist who died while taking part in this expedition.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Chugunov Island[edit]

'''Chugunov Island''' ({{coor dm|65|54|S|99|29|E|}}) is a small ice-covered [[island]], lying at the seaward extremity of [[Shackleton Ice Shelf]], between the projections of Denman and [[Scott Glaciers]]. Mapped from aerial photos taken by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]], 1946-47. Rephotographed by the Soviet expedition of 1956 and later named for [[N.A. Chugunov]], aerologist who lost his life in the Antarctic in 1958.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Church Bay[edit]

'''Church Bay''' ({{coor dm|54|0|S|37|47|W|}}) is a [[bay]] 4.5 nautical miles (8 km) wide, indenting the north coast of [[South Georgia]] between [[Low Rock Point]] and [[Cape North]]. Roughly charted by DI personnel in the period 1925-30 and surveyed by the SGS, 1951-57. The name is well established in local use.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Church Glacier[edit]

'''Church Glacier''' ({{coor dm|71|51|S|167|34|E|}}) is a tributary [[glacier]], 10 nautical miles (18 km) long, flowing southward along the west side of [[Church Ridge]] to enter [[Leander Glacier]] northwest of [[Shadow Bluff]], in the [[Admiralty Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-63. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Brooks D. Church]], laboratory management technician at [[McMurdo Station]], 1966-67 and 1967-68.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Church Nunataks[edit]

'''Church Nunataks''' ({{coor dm|66|48|S|52|39|E|}}) is a line of small [[nunatak]]s 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) northeast of [[Mount Smethurst]] and 28 nautical miles (50 km) southwest of [[Stor Hanakken Mountain]] in [[Enderby Land]]. Plotted from air photos taken from ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) aircraft in 1957. Named by [[Antarctic Names Committee of Australia]] (ANCA) for [[S.W. Church]], radio officer at [[Wilkes Station]] in 1961.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Church Point[edit]

'''Church Point''' ({{coor dm|63|41|S|57|55|W|}}) is a point 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) west of [[Camp Hill]] on the south coast of [[Trinity Peninsula]]. The feature was sighted by [[Swedish Antarctic Expedition]] in 1903; surveyed by [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) in 1945 and so named because the point rises to a rock [[peak]] (355 m), the sides of which resemble a church steeple.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Church Ridge[edit]

'''Church Ridge''' ({{coor dm|71|49|S|167|45|E|}}) is a southwest-trending ridge, 10 nautical miles (18 km) long, with several peaks over 2, 000 m high. The ridge separates the flow of the Church and [[Leander Glaciers]] in the [[Admiralty Mountains]], [[Victoria Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] aerial photography, 1960-63. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Commander [[A.E. Church]], U.S. Navy, assistant chief of staff for civil engineering with the [[U.S. Naval Support Force]], Antarctica, 1967 and 1968.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Church Rock[edit]

'''Church Rock''' ({{coor dm|53|2|S|73|26|E|}}) is a dark, steeple-like rock, 16 m high, lying at the head of [[Corinthian Bay]] opposite the terminus of [[Baudissin Glacier]], off the north side of [[Heard Island]]. Probably named after [[Captain Church]] of the schooner Mechanic, a tender to the Corinthian in Captain [[Erasmus Darwin Rogers]]' sealing fleet that landed at Heard Island in 1855. The name appears in the reports of the British the names then in use. Several members of the Church family of Montville, CT are recorded as working in the area during this period.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cape Church[edit]

'''Cape Church''' ({{coor dm|67|51|S|65|35|W|}}) is a rocky bluff which projects into the head of [[Seligman Inlet]] immediately north of [[Ahlmann Glacier]], on the east coast of [[Graham Land]]. Photographed from the air in 1940 by the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS). Charted in 1947 by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS), who named it for Professor [[James E. Church]] of the [[Agricultural Experiment Station]], University of Nevada, who developed techniques of snow surveying and meltwater run-off forecasts now widely used.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica|Church, Cape]]

Churchill Mountains[edit]

'''Churchill Mountains''' ({{coor dm|81|30|S|158|30|E|}}) is the major range of mountains and associated elevations bordering the west side of the [[Ross Ice Shelf]] between [[Byrd Glacier]] and [[Nimrod Glacier]]. Several of its highest summits, including [[Mounts Egerton]], Field, Wharton, [[Albert Markham]] and Nares, were first seen and named by the ''Discovery'' expedition, 1901-04. The mountains were mapped in detail by the [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from tellurometer surveys, 1960-61, and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960. Named by the [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Sir Winston Churchill]].

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[[Category:Mountain ranges of Antarctica]]

Churchill Peninsula[edit]

'''Churchill Peninsula''' ({{coor dm|66|30|S|62|45|W|}}) is an ice-covered [[peninsula]] between Cabinet and [[Adie Inlets]], extending some 30 nautical miles (60 km) in a southeast direction from the east coast of [[Graham Land]]. Photographed from the air by the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE) and charted from the ground by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) during 1947. Named by the FIDS for Rt. Hon. (later Sir) [[Winston S. Churchill]], M.P., [[British Prime Minister]] and leader of the [[War Cabinet]] which authorized the FIDS in 1943.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Churchill Point[edit]

'''Churchill Point''' ({{coor dm|66|24|S|110|23|E|}}) is the northwestern point of [[Holl Island]], in the [[Windmill Islands]]. First mapped from air photos taken by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]] and [[Operation Windmill]] in 1947 and 1948. Named by the [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Radioman Robert W. Churchill]], [[U.S. Navy]], a member of the [[Wilkes Station]] party of 1958.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cierva Cove[edit]

'''Cierva Cove''' ({{coor dm|64|9|S|60|53|W|}}) is a [[cove]] lying 6 nautical miles (11 km) southeast of [[Cape Sterneck]] in [[Hughes Bay]], along the west coast of [[Graham Land]]. Shown on an Argentine government chart of 1950. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1960 for Juan de la Cierva (1895-1936), Spanish designer of the autogiro, the first successful rotating wing aircraft in 1923.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cinder Hill[edit]

'''Cinder Hill''' ({{coor dm|77|17|S|166|26|E|}}) is a prominent dissected [[volcano]], 305 m, consisting of layers of red basalt scoria and cinders and abundant olivine nodules, standing between Harrison and [[Wilson Streams]] on the ice-free lower west slopes of [[Mount Bird]], [[Ross Island]]. Mapped and descriptively named by the [[New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition]] (NZGSAE), 1958-59.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cinder Spur[edit]

'''Cinder Spur''' ({{coor dm|62|9|S|58|11|W|}}) is a small spur extending into [[Legru Bay]], 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) west of [[Low Head]] on the south coast of [[King George Island]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. So named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1963 because the feature is composed mainly of volcanic cinders.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Mount Circe[edit]

'''Mount Circe''' ({{coor dm|77|28|S|160|58|E|}}) is a prominent [[peak]] over 2,000 m, standing just north of [[Mount Dido]] in the [[Olympus Range]] of [[Victoria Land]]. Named by the [[Victoria University of Wellington Antarctic Expedition]] (VUWAE) (1958-59) after a figure in Greek mythology.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Circe, Mount]]

Circle Icefall[edit]

'''Circle Icefall''' ({{coor dm|79|38|S|156|30|E|}}) is an almost impenetrable icefall near [[Tentacle Ridge]], 45 m high and 15 nautical miles (28 km) long, extending in an arc for almost the whole width across the [[Darwin Glacier]]. Named by the [[Darwin Glacier Party]] of the [[Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition]] (1956-58) for its similarity to the circle of an opera house.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cape Circoncision[edit]

'''Cape Circoncision''' ({{coor dm|54|25|S|3|21|E|}}) is a prominent cape which forms the northwest extremity of Bouvetoya. The name was given on [[January 1]], [[1739]] by [[J.B.C. Bouvet]] de Lozier, discoverer of Bouvetoya on that date, in memory of the holy day of the church calendar. Bouvet approached the [[island]] from a northwest direction and was uncertain whether his discovery was an island or part of a continent. The cape was roughly charted in 1898 by a German expedition under [[Karl Chun]]. Cartographic correlation of the name with this cape appears to be first evidenced on the chart of the Norvegia expedition of 1927-28 under Captain [[Harald Horntvedt]].

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica|Circoncision, Cape]]

Port Circumcision[edit]

'''Port Circumcision''' ({{coor dm|65|11|S|64|10|W|}}) is a [[cove]] indenting the southeast side of [[Petermann Island]], in the [[Wilhelm Archipelago]]. Discovered on [[January 1]], [[1909]] by the [[French Antarctic Expedition]] under Charcot, who named it for the holy day on which it was first sighted. The cove served as a base for the ship [[Pourquoi-Pas]]? during the 1909 winter season.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica|Circumcision, Port]]

Cirque Fjord[edit]

'''Cirque Fjord''' ({{coor dm|67|18|S|58|39|E|}}) is an ice-filled inlet on the south side of [[Law Promontory]] opening into [[Stefansson Bay]] in [[Enderby Land]]. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the [[Lars Christensen Expedition]], 1936-37, and named Botnfjorden (the cirque fjord). Seen by an ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) party in 1956. The translated form of the name recommended by [[Antarctic Names Committee of Australia]] (ANCA) has been approved.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cirque Peak[edit]

'''Cirque Peak''' ({{coor dm|72|11|S|165|58|E|}}) is a [[peak]] 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) south of [[Le Couteur Peak]], in the [[Millen Range]]. So named by the [[Northern Party]] of NZFMCAE, 1962-63, due to the peak's position at the head of a large cirque containing a section of the [[Pearl Harbor Glacier]] neve.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Mount Cis[edit]

'''Mount Cis''' ({{coor dm|77|34|S|166|19|E|}}) is a hill, 184 m, located 1.1 nautical miles (2.0 km) northeast of [[Cape Barne]] in west [[Ross Island]]. Named by the [[British Antarctic Expedition]], 1907-09, at the suggestion of geologist [[Raymond Priestley]], after one of the expeditionary dogs.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Cis, Mount]]

Citadel Bastion[edit]

'''Citadel Bastion''' ({{coor dm|72|0|S|68|32|W|}}) is a rocky, flat-topped elevation at the south side of the terminus of [[Saturn Glacier]], on the east side of [[Alexander Island]]. The feature was mapped from trimetrogon air photography taken by [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE), 1947-48, and from survey by [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS), 1948-50. The name applied by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) refers to the resemblance of the feature to a fortified structure.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Citadel Peak[edit]

'''Citadel Peak''' ({{coor dm|85|57|S|154|27|W|}}) is a [[peak]] of volcanic rock along the south side of [[Vaughan Glacier]], 6 nautical miles (11 km) east of [[Mount Vaughan]], in the [[Queen Maud Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-64. So named by [[New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition]] (NZGSAE), 1969-70; the summit is composed of vertical rock slabs, its strange appearance being reminiscent of a castle or citadel.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Clague Ridge[edit]

'''Clague Ridge''' ({{coor dm|71|14|S|65|40|E|}}) is a partially snow-covered rock ridge about 5 nautical miles (9 km) southwest of [[Armonini Nunatak]] in the [[Prince Charles Mountains]]. Plotted from ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) air photos taken in 1960. Named for [[E.L. Clague]], weather observer at [[Wilkes Station]] in 1962.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clapmatch Point[edit]

'''Clapmatch Point''' ({{coor dm|57|6|S|26|39|W|}}) is a low, lava point penetrated by narrow clefts, forming the southwest point of [[Candlemas Island]], [[South Sandwich Islands]]. The name applied by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1971 is a traditional sealers name for a female [[Fur Seal]]. There is a breeding colony of this animal on the point.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clapp Ridge[edit]

'''Clapp Ridge''' ({{coor dm|72|54|S|167|54|E|}}) is a narrow, steep-sided ridge about 9 nautical miles (17 km) long, forming the north wall of [[Hand Glacier]] in the [[Victory Mountains]], [[Victoria Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-64. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[James L. Clapp]], member of the [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) glaciological party to [[Roosevelt Island]], 1967-68.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Claquebue Island[edit]

'''Claquebue Island''' ({{coor dm|66|46|S|141|35|E|}}) is a rocky [[island]] 0.25 nautical miles (0.5 km) long, lying 0.05 nautical miles (0.1 km) east of [[Dru Rock]] in the [[Curzon Islands]]. Charted in 1951 by the [[French Antarctic Expedition]] and named by them, for the village in [[La Jument Verte]], a novel much read and appreciated by members of the French expedition.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Islands of Antarctica]]

Mount Clara[edit]

'''Mount Clara''' ({{coor dm|54|51|S|36|2|W|}}) is a [[peak]] rising to about 790 m to the east of [[Mount Normann]] and south of [[Larsen Harbor]], in southeast [[South Georgia]]. Charted and named by DI personnel in 1927.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Clara, Mount]]

Clare Range[edit]

'''Clare Range''' ({{coor dm|77|10|S|161|10|E|}}) is the range extending west-southwest from [[Sperm Bluff]] to the [[Willett Range]] on the south side of [[Mackay Glacier]], in [[Victoria Land]]. Circumnavigated in 1957 by the [[New Zealand Northern Survey Party]] of the [[Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition]] (1956-58). Named by them after [[Clare College]] of Cambridge, England.

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[[Category:Mountain ranges of Antarctica]]

Clarence Island[edit]

'''Clarence Island''' ({{coor dm|61|12|S|54|5|W|}}) is an [[island]] 12 nautical miles (22 km) long, which is the easternmost of the [[South Shetland Islands]]. The name dates back to at least 1821 and is now established in international usage.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Claridge Terrace[edit]

'''Claridge Terrace''' ({{coor dm|77|42|S|162|20|E|}}) is a

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clarie Coast[edit]

'''Clarie Coast''' ({{coor dm|66|30|S|133|0|E|}}) is that portion of the coast of [[Wilkes Land]] lying between [[Cape Morse]], in 13010E, and [[Pourquoi Pas Point]], in 13611E. Discovered in January 1840 by Captain [[Jules Dumont]] d'Urville, who recognized the existence of land lying south of the ice cliffs to which he applied the name "[[Cote Clarie]]," after [[Madame Jacquinot]], wife of the captain of his second ship, the Zelee.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clarity Point[edit]

'''Clarity Point''' ({{coor dm|54|4|S|37|1|W|}}) is a point on the east side of [[Blue Whale Harbor]], [[South Georgia]]. The feature was charted and named "[[Clear Point]]" by DI in 1930. The name was amended by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1991 to avoid duplication of Clear Point at [[Leith Harbor]] in [[Stromness Bay]].

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clark Glacier[edit]

'''Clark Glacier''' ({{coor dm|77|25|S|162|25|E|}}) is a [[glacier]] between [[Mount Theseus]] and [[Mount Allen]], occupying a low pass in the east part of the [[Olympus Range]] in [[Victoria Land]]. Named by the [[Victoria University of Wellington Antarctic Expedition]] (VUWAE), 1958-59, for Professor [[R.H. Clark]], head of the [[Geology Dept]]., [[Victoria University]] of Wellington, who was immediately responsible for the sponsoring of the expedition.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Clark Hills[edit]

'''Clark Hills''' ({{coor dm|70|43|S|63|25|W|}}) is a cluster of low, mainly snow-covered hills of about 4 nautical miles (7 km) extent, located 5 nautical miles (9 km) southwest of the [[Eland Mountains]] in [[Palmer Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) in 1974. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Kerry B. Clark]], [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) biologist on the [[International Weddell Sea Oceanographic Expedition]] in 1968 and 1969.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clark Island[edit]

'''Clark Island''' ({{coor dm|74|5|S|105|17|W|}}) is an [[island]] 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) long in eastern [[Amundsen Sea]]. It is the largest island of a small group lying 38 nautical miles (70 km) west-southwest of [[Canisteo Peninsula]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[F. Jerry Clark]] who participated in [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) glaciological-geophysical work at [[Roosevelt Island]], 1961-62, and on traverses from [[Byrd Station]], 1963-64.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Islands of Antarctica]]

Clark Knoll[edit]

'''Clark Knoll''' ({{coor dm|76|53|S|146|59|W|}}) is an ice-covered knoll 4 nautical miles (7 km) southwest of [[Mount Dane]] in the west part of [[Radford Island]], [[Marshall Archipelago]]. Mapped by [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS) (1939-41) and by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos (1959-65). Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Elton G. Clark]], utilitiesman, U.S. Navy, at [[Byrd Station]] in 1967.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clark Mountains[edit]

'''Clark Mountains''' ({{coor dm|77|16|S|142|0|W|}}) is a group of low mountains rising above 1,200 m, standing 10 nautical miles (18 km) east of the [[Allegheny Mountains]] in the [[Ford Ranges]], [[Marie Byrd Land]]. Discovered and photographed on aerial flights in 1940 by the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS) and named for [[Clark University]], Worcester, MA.

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[[Category:Mountain ranges of Antarctica]]

Clark Nunatak[edit]

'''Clark Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|62|40|S|60|55|W|}}) is a [[nunatak]] lying on the southern side of [[Rotch Dome]] in the west part of [[Livingston Island]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1958 for [[Daniel W. Clark]], first mate of the brig Hersilia in 1820-21, who was in charge of a sealing gang on the [[South Beaches]], Livingston Island. Clark was responsible for one of the surviving descriptions of the activities of early American sealers in the South Shetland Islands.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Clark Peak[edit]

'''Clark Peak''' ({{coor dm|77|31|S|154|12|W|}}) is a rock [[peak]] (645 m) surmounting a bluff on the west side of [[Larson Glacier]] in northern [[Edward VII Peninsula]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] aerial photographs, 1964-67. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Leroy Clark]], member of the winter party of the [[Byrd Antarctic Expedition]], 1933-35.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Clark Peninsula[edit]

'''Clark Peninsula''' ({{coor dm|66|15|S|110|33|E|}}) is a rocky [[peninsula]], 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) long and 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) wide, lying at the north side of [[Newcomb Bay]] on [[Budd Coast]]. First mapped from aerial photographs taken by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]] in February 1947 and thought to be an [[island]] connected by a steep snow ramp to the continental ice overlying Budd Coast. The term peninsula was considered more appropriate by the [[Wilkes Station]] party of 1957 whose headquarters were on this peninsula. Named by the [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Captain [[John E. Clark]], [[U.S. Navy]], captain of the USS Currituck, seaplane tender and flagship of the western task group of U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, [[Task Force]] 68, 1946-47.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clark Point[edit]

'''Clark Point''' ({{coor dm|66|33|S|123|55|E|}}) is an ice-covered point at the east side of the entrance to [[Paulding Bay]]. Delineated by [[G.D. Blodgett]] (1955) from aerial photographs taken by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]] (1946-47). Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[George W. Clark]], Midshipman on the sloop Peacock during the [[United States Exploring Expedition]] (1838-42) under Lieutenant [[Charles Wilkes]].

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clark Ridge[edit]

'''Clark Ridge''' ({{coor dm|84|32|S|64|50|W|}}) is a prominent rock ridge, 4 nautical miles (7 km) long, located 4 nautical miles (7 km) west of [[Mount Lowry]] in [[Anderson Hills]] in northern [[Patuxent Range]], [[Pensacola Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1956-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Larry Clark]], cook at [[Plateau Station]], winter 1967.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clark Spur[edit]

'''Clark Spur''' ({{coor dm|84|47|S|169|12|W|}}) is a narrow, rocky spur about 3 nautical miles (6 km) long, extending from the foothills of [[Prince Olav Mountains]] to the edge of the [[Ross Ice Shelf]]. The spur forms the east side of the mouth of [[Morris Glacier]], about 6 nautical miles (11 km) northwest of [[Mount Henson]]. Discovered and photographed by the [[Byrd Antarctic Expedition]] (1928-30) and named for [[Arnold H. Clark]], asst. physicist who wintered with the expedition.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clarke Bluff[edit]

'''Clarke Bluff''' ({{coor dm|69|39|S|159|13|E|}}) is a steep bluff (840 m) at the east end of [[Feeney Ridge]] in the [[Wilson Hills]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-63. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant (j.g.) [[Jon B. Clarke]], U.S. Navy, Navigator on aerial photographic missions in LC-130F Hercules aircraft during [[Operation Deep Freeze]] 1967 and 1968.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clarke Glacier[edit]

'''Clarke Glacier''' ({{coor dm|68|48|S|66|56|W|}}) is a [[glacier]], 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) wide and 20 nautical miles (37 km) long, flowing west to [[Mikkelsen Bay]] along the north side of [[Sickle Mountain]] and [[Baudin Peaks]], on the west coast of [[Graham Land]]. First roughly surveyed in 1936 by the [[British Graham Land Expedition]] (BGLE) under Rymill. The glacier was traversed near its head by a [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS) sledge party in January 1941. Its lower reaches were surveyed in 1948-49 by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS), and the glacier was named by them for [[Louis C.G. Clarke]], Dir. of the [[Fitzwilliam Museum]], Cambridge, 1937-46, who greatly assisted the BGLE, 1934-37.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Clarke Glacier[edit]

'''Clarke Glacier''' ({{coor dm|75|34|S|162|5|E|}}) is a [[glacier]], 5 nautical miles (9 km) long, draining east to the coast of [[Victoria Land]] immediately north of [[Lewandowski Point]]. The seaward extremity of this glacier merges with the flow of [[Davis Glacier]] and other glaciers from the south and contributes to the floating tongue of ice between [[Cape Reynolds]] and [[Lamplugh Island]]. Discovered and named by the [[British Antarctic Expedition]], 1907-09, under Shackleton.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Clarke Glacier[edit]

'''Clarke Glacier''' ({{coor dm|75|11|S|139|6|W|}}) is a [[glacier]] about 8 nautical miles (15 km) long draining from [[Coulter Heights]] to [[Hull Bay]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) after [[Theodore S. Clarke]], geophysicist, University of Wisconsin; research from early 1990s to the present focused on theoretical and field analysis of [[ice stream]] area of [[West Antarctica]].

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Mount Clarke[edit]

'''Mount Clarke''' ({{coor dm|85|5|S|172|18|E|}}) is a [[mountain]] (3,210 m) located 13 nautical miles (24 km) due east of [[Mount Iveagh]] in the [[Queen Maud Mountains]]. The feature rises along the east margin of the [[Snakeskin Glacier]], near the edge of the interior ice plateau. Discovered and named by the [[Southern Journey Party]] of the [[British Antarctic Expedition]] (1907-09) under [[Ernest Shackleton]].

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Clarke, Mount]]

Clarkson Cliffs[edit]

'''Clarkson Cliffs''' ({{coor dm|80|28|S|27|4|W|}}) is an ice-covered cliffs marked by rock exposures, rising to 1,400 m at the northeast edge of [[Fuchs Dome]], [[Shackleton Range]]. Photographed from the air by the [[U.S. Navy]], 1967, and surveyed by [[British Antarctic Survey]] (BAS), 1968-71. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) after [[Peter D. Clarkson]], BAS geologist, [[Halley Station]], 1968-70, who worked in the area for four seasons, 1968-71, 1977-78; Head, BAS Mineralogy, Geology and [[Geochemistry Section]], 1976-89; at [[Scott Polar Research Institute]] (SPRI) from 1989.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clarkson Peak[edit]

'''Clarkson Peak''' ({{coor dm|83|19|S|164|34|E|}}) is a prominent conical [[peak]], 2,825 m, at the head of [[Robb Glacier]], on the spur running west from [[Mount Miller]]. Sighted in January 1958 by the [[New Zealand Southern Party]] of the [[Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition]] (1956-58), and named for Mr. [[T.R. Clarkson]], a member of the [[Ross Sea Committee]].

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Clarsach Glacier[edit]

'''Clarsach Glacier''' ({{coor dm|69|57|S|70|17|W|}}) is a [[glacier]] flowing south between [[Prague Spur]] and [[Finlandia Foothills]] in north [[Alexander Island]]. The feature was photographed from the air by [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE), 1947-48, and was mapped from these photographs by [[D. Searle]] of [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS), 1960. Further delineation was made from [[U.S. Navy]] aerial photographs taken 1966-67 and from [[U.S. Landsat]] imagery taken January 1974. So named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC), 1977; in plan view the outline of the glacier resembles a clarsach, or Irish harp.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Claude Point[edit]

'''Claude Point''' ({{coor dm|64|7|S|62|36|W|}}) is a point which forms the south side of the entrance to [[Guyou Bay]] on the west side of [[Brabant Island]], in the [[Palmer Archipelago]]. Discovered by the [[French Antarctic Expedition]], 1903-05, under Charcot, who named it for [[Monsieur Claude]], an associate member of the Bureau des Longitudes.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clausen Glacier[edit]

'''Clausen Glacier''' ({{coor dm|76|10|S|112|3|W|}}) is a narrow [[glacier]] draining northward from the summit of [[Mount Takahe]] in [[Marie Byrd Land]]. The terminus of the glacier is just west of [[Knezevich Rock]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] aerial photos, 1959-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Henrik B. Clausen]] (University of Bern, Switzerland), [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) glaciologist at [[Byrd Station]], 1969-70.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Clausnitzer Glacier[edit]

'''Clausnitzer Glacier''' ({{coor dm|74|2|S|164|41|E|}}) is a tributary [[glacier]] flowing east from [[Random Hills]] to enter [[Tinker Glacier]] just north of [[Harrow Peaks]], in [[Victoria Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1955-63. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Frazer W. Clausnitzer]], ionospheric physics scientist at [[McMurdo Station]], winter 1966.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Claydon Peak[edit]

'''Claydon Peak''' ({{coor dm|83|25|S|162|3|E|}}) is a [[peak]] in the [[Queen Elizabeth Range]], 3,040 m, which presents a rocky face to the northeast, standing just south of January Colonel Visited by the [[New Zealand Southern Survey Party]] of the [[Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition]] (1956-58) in early 1958. Named by them for [[Squadron-Leader J.R. Claydon]], commanding officer of the [[Antarctic Flight]] of the RNZAF, who assisted the survey team operating in this vicinity.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Clayton Hill[edit]

'''Clayton Hill''' ({{coor dm|65|11|S|64|10|W|}}) is a hill, 125 m, in the north-central part of [[Petermann Island]] in the [[Wilhelm Archipelago]]. First charted and named by the [[French Antarctic Expedition]], 1908-10, under Charcot.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clayton Ramparts[edit]

'''Clayton Ramparts''' ({{coor dm|80|44|S|27|25|W|}}) is a line of east-west cliffs rising to over 1,600 m at the south margin of [[Fuchs Dome]], [[Shackleton Range]]. Surveyed by the [[Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition]], 1957, photographed from the air by the [[U.S. Navy]], 1967, and further surveyed by [[British Antarctic Survey]] (BAS), 1968-71. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) after [[Charles A. Clayton]], BAS surveyor, [[Halley Station]], 1969-71, who worked in the area.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clear Island[edit]

'''Clear Island''' ({{coor dm|64|55|S|63|44|W|}}) is a small snow-capped [[island]] lying immediately north of [[Wednesday Island]] and forming the northeasternmost of the [[Wauwermans Islands]], in the [[Wilhelm Archipelago]]. Shown on an Argentine government chart of 1950. So named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1958 because the island is conspicuous from all directions except the southwest and is of great value as a reference point for mariners.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Clear Lake[edit]

'''Clear Lake''' ({{coor dm|77|32|S|166|9|E|}}) is a small [[lake]] just west-northwest of [[Blue Lake]] at [[Cape Royds]], [[Ross Island]]. A descriptive name given by the [[British Antarctic Expedition]] (1907-09). It is the deepest lake in this vicinity.

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[[Category:Lakes of Antarctica]]

Clear Point[edit]

'''Clear Point''' ({{coor dm|54|8|S|36|40|W|}}) is a point forming the northeast side of the entrance to [[Leith Harbor]], [[Stromness Bay]], on the north coast of [[South Georgia]]. The name appears to be first used on a 1929 [[British Admiralty]] chart.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Mount Cleary[edit]

'''Mount Cleary''' ({{coor dm|76|27|S|161|58|E|}}) is a summit that overlooks [[Pa Tio Tio Gap]] from the south. It rises over 1400 m at the north extremity of [[Endeavour Massif]] in [[Kirkwood Range]]. Named after [[Peter Cleary]], who has served with the [[Antarctic Division]] and Antarctica NZ since 1978; worked with NZ and UK programs as field assistant, dog handler, and in logistics support. Currently working for Antarctica NZ.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Cleary, Mount]]

Cleaves Glacier[edit]

'''Cleaves Glacier''' ({{coor dm|82|57|S|165|0|E|}}) is a [[glacier]] in the [[Holland Range]], flowing northwest from [[Mount Reid]] into the east side of [[Robb Glacier]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from tellurometer surveys (1961-62) and Navy air photos (1960). Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Harold H. Cleaves]], Master of the USNS Pvt. [[Joseph F. Merrell]] during [[Operation Deepfreeze]] 1964-65.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Cleft Island[edit]

'''Cleft Island''' ({{coor dm|69|21|S|75|38|E|}}) is a small [[island]] to the north of [[Bolingen Islands]], lying 2.5 nautical miles (4.6 km) southeast of [[Lichen Island]] in southern [[Prydz Bay]]. The island is split by a deep channel about 6 m wide. The island was plotted from air photos taken by the [[Lars Christensen Expedition]], 1936-37, and called Lorten by Norwegian cartographers. The feature was visited by an ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) party from the [[Nella Dan]] in February 1966 and renamed with reference to the deep channel.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Islands of Antarctica]]

Cleft Ledge[edit]

'''Cleft Ledge''' ({{coor dm|77|32|S|160|51|E|}}) is a flat-topped ridge 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) long and 0.3 nautical miles (0.6 km) wide between [[Shaw Trough]] and [[Healy Trough]] in the Labyrinth of [[Wright Valley]], [[McMurdo Dry Valleys]]. The ledge rises to 920 m and is 0.3 nautical miles (0.6 km) northwest of [[Hoffman Ledge]]. The name is descriptive and was recommended by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) (2004) because a central north-south hanging [[valley]] nearly divides the ledge in half.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cleft Peak[edit]

'''Cleft Peak''' ({{coor dm|83|55|S|173|34|E|}}) is a prominent coastal [[peak]] (1,245 m) whose eastern side is cleft from summit to base by a huge fissure. The feature rises from the west part of the [[Separation Range]] and overlooks the terminus of [[Hood Glacier]]. Named by the [[New Zealand Alpine Club Antarctic Expedition]] (1959-60) whose four members were landed in the vicinity by aircraft of [[U.S. Navy Squadron VX]]-6.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Cleft Point[edit]

'''Cleft Point''' ({{coor dm|60|37|S|45|46|W|}}) is a point on the east side of [[Norway Bight]] on the south coast of [[Coronation Island]], [[South Orkney Islands]]. The point marks the west extremity of an [[island]] which is separated from Coronation Island by a narrow channel, but it was mapped by DI in 1933 as a point on Coronation Island. The descriptive name alludes to the narrow separation from the main island and was given by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) following their survey of 1950.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clem Nunatak[edit]

'''Clem Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|78|31|S|160|40|E|}}) is an isolated rock [[nunatak]], 1,260 m, standing at the west side of [[Skelton Glacier]], 7 nautical miles (13 km) southwest of [[Halfway Nunatak]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) in 1964 for [[Willis R. Clem]], a construction mechanic at [[McMurdo Station]] in 1959.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Clemence Massif[edit]

'''Clemence Massif''' ({{coor dm|72|11|S|68|43|E|}}) is an elongated, mostly ice-free massif, 15 nautical miles (28 km) long and rising to 1,400 m, standing 30 nautical miles (60 km) southeast of [[Shaw Massif]] on the east side of [[Lambert Glacier]]. Discovered by ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) personnel from Beaver aircraft piloted by [[Flying Officer D.M. Johnston]], RAAF, in 1957. Named by [[Antarctic Names Committee of Australia]] (ANCA) for [[Squadron Leader P.H. Clemence]], who commanded the RAAF [[Antarctic Flight]] at [[Mawson Station]] in 1957.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clement Hill[edit]

'''Clement Hill''' ({{coor dm|62|13|S|58|58|W|}}) is a hill rising to 135 m, the highest elevation in southern [[Fildes Peninsula]], 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) northwest of [[Halfthree Point]], [[King George Island]], [[South Shetland Islands]]. The [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) named the hill in 1977 after [[Colin C. Clement]], [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) base leader and diesel mechanic at [[Admiralty Bay]], 1956-57.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clements Island[edit]

'''Clements Island''' ({{coor dm|65|56|S|66|0|W|}}) is an [[island]] 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) long lying immediately south of [[Rabot Island]] in the [[Biscoe Islands]]. [[The French Antarctic Expedition]], 1903-05, under Charcot, gave the name "[[Ile Clements Markham]]" for [[Sir Clements Markham]], President of the [[Royal Geographical Society]], 1893-1905. Charcot applied this name to an incompletely defined island northeast of [[Renaud Island]], in what is now the [[Pitt Islands]]. The recommended application, however, is based upon the map of the [[British Graham Land Expedition]] (BGLE), 1934-37, which provided a more reliable chart of the area. The first part of the name rather than the last, has been retained to distinguish this feature from [[Markham Island]] in [[Terra Nova Bay]], [[Victoria Land]].

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Clemons Spur[edit]

'''Clemons Spur''' ({{coor dm|82|31|S|51|13|W|}}) is a bare rock spur next south of [[Forlidas Ridge]] in the [[Dufek Massif]], [[Pensacola Mountains]], q.v. Named at the suggestion of party leader [[Arthur B. Ford]], [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS), after [[Samuel D. Clemons]], steward, [[U.S. Navy Squadron]] VXE-6, with the USGS Pensacola Mountains survey, 1965-66.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clerke Rocks[edit]

'''Clerke Rocks''' ({{coor dm|55|1|S|34|41|W|}}) is a group of rocks extending 5 nautical miles (9 km) in an east-west direction, lying some 35 nautical miles (60 km) east-southeast of [[South Georgia]]. Discovered in 1775 by a British expedition under Cook, who named them for [[Charles Clerke]], officer on the Resolution who first saw the rocks.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clery Peak[edit]

'''Clery Peak''' ({{coor dm|65|3|S|63|58|W|}}) is a [[peak]], 640 m, on the north side of [[Mount Lacroix]], a conspicuous massif at the north end of [[Booth Island]], in the [[Wilhelm Archipelago]]. Charted by the [[French Antarctic Expedition]], 1903-05, under Charcot, who named it for his father-in-law [[L. Clery]], an eminent French lawyer.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Cletrac Peak[edit]

'''Cletrac Peak''' ({{coor dm|64|20|S|59|38|W|}}) is a conspicuous steep-sided [[peak]] at the northwest corner of [[Larsen Inlet]], immediately north of [[Muskeg Gap]], in [[Graham Land]]. Mapped from surveys by [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) (1960-61). Named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) after Cletrac tractors made by the [[Cleveland Tractor Co]]., Ohio, the first to be used successfully in the Antarctic, by [[Admiral Byrd]]'s second expedition (1933-35).

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Cleveland Glacier[edit]

'''Cleveland Glacier''' ({{coor dm|76|55|S|162|1|E|}}) is a [[glacier]] about 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) wide which flows east-southeast from [[Mounts Morrison]] and Brogger to enter [[Mackay Glacier]] just west of [[Mount Marston]], in [[Victoria Land]]. Discovered by the [[British Antarctic Expedition]] (1910-13) and named by [[Frank Debenham]], a member of the expedition, after his mother's maiden name.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Cleveland Mesa[edit]

'''Cleveland Mesa''' ({{coor dm|86|19|S|130|0|W|}}) is a high, ice-covered mesa, 5 nautical miles (9 km) long and 3 nautical miles (6 km) wide, situated at the southeast end of [[Michigan Plateau]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-64. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Harlan Cleveland]], Asst. Sec. of State for [[International Organization Affairs]], 1961-65, who was Chairman of the [[Antarctic Policy Group]] in 1965.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cleveland Rock[edit]

'''Cleveland Rock''' ({{coor dm|53|59|S|37|22|W|}}) is a rock lying just off [[Cape Buller]] on the west side of the entrance to the Bay of Isles, [[South Georgia]]. Positioned by the SGS in the period 1951-57. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) for [[Benjamin D. Cleveland]] of [[New Bedford]], MA, captain of the brig Daisy which visited South Georgia in 1912-13.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cliff Island[edit]

'''Cliff Island''' ({{coor dm|66|0|S|65|39|W|}}) is a narrow cliffed [[island]] at the south side of [[Mutton Cove]], lying immediately south of [[Upper Island]] and 8 nautical miles (15 km) west of [[Prospect Point]], off the west coast of [[Graham Land]]. Charted and named by the [[British Graham Land Expedition]] (BGLE) under Rymill, 1934-37.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Clifford Glacier[edit]

'''Clifford Glacier''' ({{coor dm|70|23|S|62|30|W|}}) is a broad [[glacier]], about 40 nautical miles (70 km) long, flowing in an east-northeast direction to the gap between [[Mount Tenniel]] and the [[Eland Mountains]], and then east to [[Smith Inlet]] on the east coast of [[Palmer Land]]. The upper part of this glacier was charted in 1936 by the [[British Graham Land Expedition]] (BGLE) under Rymill; the seaward side by the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS) survey party which explored along this coast in 1940. During 1947 it was photographed from the air by the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE) under Ronne, who in conjunction with the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) charted it from the ground. Named in 1952 by the FIDS for [[Sir G. Miles Clifford]], then Gov. of the [[Falkland Islands]].

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Clifford Peak[edit]

'''Clifford Peak''' ({{coor dm|64|34|S|62|53|W|}}) is a [[peak]], 1,160 m, at the northeast end of the [[Osterrieth Range]], [[Anvers Island]], in the [[Palmer Archipelago]]. Probably first seen by the [[Belgian Antarctic Expedition]], 1897-99, under Gerlache. The peak was named by members of HMS Snipe following an Antarctic cruise in January 1948, for [[Sir G. Miles Clifford]].

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Cline Glacier[edit]

'''Cline Glacier''' ({{coor dm|71|40|S|62|0|W|}}) is a large [[glacier]] that drains the vicinity at the east side of [[Mount Jackson]] and flows generally southeast between [[Schirmacher Massif]] and [[Rowley Massif]] into the head of [[Odom Inlet]], on the east side of [[Palmer Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) in 1974. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[David R. Cline]], [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) biologist on the [[International Weddell Sea Oceanographic Expeditions]] in 1968 and 1969.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Clingman Peak[edit]

'''Clingman Peak''' ({{coor dm|73|50|S|161|12|E|}}) is the final [[peak]] (2,150 m) along the south wall at the head of [[Priestley Glacier]], in [[Victoria Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-64. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Otis Clingman]], Jr., biologist at [[McMurdo Station]], 1965-66.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Clinker Bluff[edit]

'''Clinker Bluff''' ({{coor dm|78|31|S|161|35|E|}}) is a detached bluff within the [[Skelton Glacier]], due west of [[Mount Tricouni]]. Surveyed in 1957 by the [[New Zealand]] party of the [[Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition]] (1956-58) and so named because it resembles the shape of a clinker, a rectangular nail used in alpine boots, and because of its association with nearby Mount Tricouni.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clinker Gulch[edit]

'''Clinker Gulch''' ({{coor dm|57|3|S|26|42|W|}}) is a gulch extending from [[Lucifer Hill]] to the north shore of [[Candlemas Island]], [[South Sandwich Islands]]. The name applied by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1971 reflects the actively volcanic, sulphurous nature of the area, and the loose piles of lava debris, resembling furnace clinkers, which wall the gulch.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clinton Spur[edit]

'''Clinton Spur''' ({{coor dm|82|39|S|52|45|W|}}) is a rock spur on the south side of [[Dufek Massif]], 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) southeast of [[Neuburg Peak]], in the [[Pensacola Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1956-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant [[Clinton R. Smith]], (MC) U.S. Navy, of the [[Ellsworth Station]] winter party, 1957.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clio Glacier[edit]

'''Clio Glacier''' ({{coor dm|77|26|S|162|0|E|}}) is a

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Cape Cloos[edit]

'''Cape Cloos''' ({{coor dm|65|7|S|64|0|W|}}) is a high rock cape fronting on [[Lemaire Channel]] and marking the north side of the entrance to [[Girard Bay]], on the west coast of [[Graham Land]]. Discovered by the [[Belgian Antarctic Expedition]], 1897-99, under Gerlache, and named after [[M. Cloos]], sometime [[Honorary Consul]] in Denmark.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica|Cloos, Cape]]

Mount Cloos[edit]

'''Mount Cloos''' ({{coor dm|65|7|S|63|57|W|}}) is a dome-shaped [[mountain]] probably over 915 m, standing at the north side of [[Girard Bay]] and 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) northeast of [[Cape Cloos]], on the west coast of [[Graham Land]]. Discovered by the [[Belgian Antarctic Expedition]], 1897-99, under Gerlache. Named in association with Cape Cloos by the [[French Antarctic Expedition]] under Charcot, 1908-10.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Cloos, Mount]]

Close Islands[edit]

'''Close Islands''' ({{coor dm|67|1|S|144|27|E|}}) is a cluster of about three small islands lying in the western part of the entrance to [[Buchanan Bay]]. Discovered by the [[Australasian Antarctic Expedition]] (1911-l4) under [[Douglas Mawson]], who named the group for [[John H. Close]], a member of the expedition.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Islands of Antarctica]]

Cape Close[edit]

'''Cape Close''' ({{coor dm|65|55|S|52|29|E|}}) is a cape on the coast of [[Enderby Land]], 30 nautical miles (60 km) west of [[Cape Batterbee]]. Discovered by the [[British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition]] (BANZARE), 1929-31, under Mawson, who named it for [[Sir Charles Close]], President of the [[Royal Geographical Society]], 1927-30.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica|Close, Cape]]

Clothier Harbor[edit]

'''Clothier Harbor''' ({{coor dm|62|22|S|59|40|W|}}) is a small harbor on the northwest side of [[Robert Island]], 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) northeast of the west end of the [[island]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. Named by American sealers in about 1820 after the sealing vessel Clothier, under Captain [[Alexander Clark]], one of several American sealing vessels headquartered at this harbor during the 1820-21 season. [[The Clothier]] went aground here and sank on [[December 9]], [[1820]].

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

The Cloudmaker[edit]

'''The Cloudmaker''' ({{coor dm|84|17|S|169|25|E|}}) is a massive [[mountain]], 2,680 m, standing at the west side of [[Beardmore Glacier]], just south of [[Hewson Glacier]]. Easily identified by its high, ice-free slope facing Beardmore Glacier. Discovered by the [[British Antarctic Expedition]] (1907-09), and so named because of a cloud which usually appeared near the summit, providing a useful landmark during their journey up the Beardmore Glacier.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica|Cloudmaker, The]]

Mount Clough[edit]

'''Mount Clough''' ({{coor dm|85|54|S|158|26|W|}}) is an ice-free [[mountain]], 2,230 m, standing 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) east of [[Mount Dort]], at the south side of [[Cappellari Glacier]], in the [[Queen Maud Mountains]]. Discovered and first mapped by the [[Byrd Antarctic Expedition]], 1928-30. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[John W. Clough]], geophysicist who participated in the [[South Pole-Queen Maud Land Traverse II]], summer 1965-66.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Clough, Mount]]

Clow Island[edit]

'''Clow Island''' ({{coor dm|77|37|S|163|10|E|}}) is an [[island]] 0.6 nautical miles (1.1 km) long in the east part of [[Lake Fryxell]] in [[Taylor Valley]], [[Victoria Land]]. This feature was a [[peninsula]] as recently as the 1980s when the rising level of the [[lake]] submerged the east part of the peninsula and created the island. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) (2000) after [[Gary D. Clow]], [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS), who studied sand/ice interactions and sediment deposition in perennially ice-covered lakes in Taylor Valley, 1985-86; [[glacier]] geophysics at [[Taylor Dome]], 1993-94 through 1995-96.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Islands of Antarctica]]

Clowes Bay[edit]

'''Clowes Bay''' ({{coor dm|60|44|S|45|38|W|}}) is a [[bay]] 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) wide, entered between [[Confusion Point]] and the [[Oliphant Islands]], along the south side of [[Signy Island]] in the [[South Orkney Islands]]. Charted in 1933 by DI personnel on the [[Discovery II]], who named it for [[Archibald J. Clowes]], English oceanographer on the staff of the [[Discovery Committee]], 1924-46.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Clowes Glacier[edit]

'''Clowes Glacier''' ({{coor dm|72|56|S|60|41|W|}}) is a [[glacier]] 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) wide, which flows east to enter [[Mason Inlet]], on the east coast of [[Palmer Land]]. Discovered and photographed from the air in December 1940 by the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS). During 1947 it was photographed from the air by the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE) under Ronne, who in conjunction with the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) charted it from the ground. Named by the FIDS for [[Archibald J. Clowes]].

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Cloyd Island[edit]

'''Cloyd Island''' ({{coor dm|66|25|S|110|33|E|}}) is a rocky [[island]], 0.6 nautical miles (1.1 km) long, between Ford and [[Herring Islands]] in the south part of the [[Windmill Islands]]. First mapped from air photos taken by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]] and [[Operation Windmill]] in 1947 and 1948. Named by the [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[J.R. Cloyd]], [[Army Transport Service]] observer with [[U.S. Navy Operation Windmill]] which established astronomical control stations in the area in January 1948.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Club Lake[edit]

'''Club Lake''' ({{coor dm|68|33|S|78|14|E|}}) is a salt-water [[lake]] in the central part of [[Breidnes Peninsula]] in the [[Vestfold Hills]]. The lake is 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) long and its irregular shape resembles a club which is elongated NE-SW. Mapped from air photos taken by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]], 1946-47. Remapped by ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) (1957-58) who gave the name.

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[[Category:Lakes of Antarctica]]

Co-pilot Glacier[edit]

'''Co-pilot Glacier''' ({{coor dm|73|11|S|164|22|E|}}) is a short, steep tributary [[glacier]], flowing from the west and south slopes of [[Mount Overlord]] to the upper part of [[Aviator Glacier]] in [[Victoria Land]]. Named by the northern party of [[New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition]] (NZGSAE), 1962-63, in recognition of services rendered by pilots of [[U.S. Navy Squadron VX]]-6, and in association with nearby [[Pilot Glacier]].

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Coal Harbor[edit]

'''Coal Harbor''' ({{coor dm|54|2|S|37|57|W|}}) is a small [[bay]] 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km) east of [[Undine Harbor]] along the south coast and near the west end of [[South Georgia]]. The name [[Coaling Harbor]], given in about 1912, suggests a possible early use of the bay by sealers and whalers. The name was shortened to Coal Harbor by DI personnel who charted the area during the period 1926-30.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Coal Island[edit]

'''Coal Island''' ({{coor dm|54|2|S|37|57|W|}}) is a small tussock-covered [[island]] with off-lying rocks marking the west side of the entrance to [[Coal Harbor]], near the west end of [[South Georgia]]. Charted by DI personnel on the Discovery during the period 1926-30, and by HMS Owen in 1960-61. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1963 in association with Coal Harbor.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Coal Nunatak[edit]

'''Coal Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|72|7|S|68|32|W|}}) is a flat-topped rock mass with steep cliffs facing south, standing 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) southwest of [[Corner Cliffs]] on the southeast coast of [[Alexander Island]]. First seen from the air by [[Lincoln Ellsworth]] on [[November 23]], [[1935]], and mapped from photos obtained on that flight by [[W.L.G. Joerg]]. Observed from the northwest (the direction from which Ellsworth photographed this [[nunatak]]), only the summit protrudes above the coastal ice, and it was uncertain whether this was a [[peak]] on Alexander Island or an [[island]] in [[George VI Sound]]. Its true nature was determined by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) who visited and surveyed this nunatak in 1949. So named by FIDS because thin lenses of coal occur there.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Coal Rock[edit]

'''Coal Rock''' ({{coor dm|83|29|S|50|38|W|}}) is a prominent [[nunatak]] lying 4 nautical miles (7 km) southeast of [[Fierle Peak]] at the south end of [[Forrestal Range]], [[Pensacola Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1956-66. Named by [[Dwight L. Schmidt]], USGS geologist to these mountains, for the Permian coal that is well exposed on the nunatak.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Coalsack Bluff[edit]

'''Coalsack Bluff''' ({{coor dm|84|14|S|162|25|E|}}) is a small rock bluff standing at the northern limits of [[Walcott Neve]], 6 nautical miles (11 km) west-southwest of [[Bauhs Nunatak]]. So named by the [[New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition]] (NZGSAE) (1961-62) because of the coal seams found running through the bluff.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Coalseam Cliffs[edit]

'''Coalseam Cliffs''' ({{coor dm|79|10|S|28|50|W|}}) is a rock cliffs forming the northwest part of [[Mount Faraway]] in the [[Theron Mountains]]. First mapped in 1956-57 by the CTAE. So named because a coal seam was found when members of the [[Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition]] made an aircraft landing there in 1957.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Coast Lake[edit]

'''Coast Lake''' ({{coor dm|77|32|S|166|8|E|}}) is a small [[lake]] at [[Cape Royds]], [[Ross Island]], lying close to the coast, about 0.75 nautical miles (1.4 km) north of [[Flagstaff Point]]. Named by the [[British Antarctic Expedition]] (1907-09) because of its position.

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[[Category:Lakes of Antarctica]]

Coates Rocks[edit]

'''Coates Rocks''' ({{coor dm|72|32|S|164|20|E|}}) is a small group of rocks in the northwest part of [[Evans Neve]], at the south side of [[Freyberg Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos 1960-64. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Donald A. Coates]], [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) geologist at [[Hallett Station]], summer 1964-65, and [[McMurdo Station]], 1966-67.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Mount Coates[edit]

'''Mount Coates''' ({{coor dm|67|52|S|62|31|E|}}) is a [[peak]], 1,280 m, just south of [[Mount Lawrence]] in the [[David Range]] of the [[Framnes Mountains]]. Discovered and named in February 1931 by the [[British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition]] (BANZARE) under Mawson.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Coates, Mount]]

Mount Coates[edit]

'''Mount Coates''' ({{coor dm|77|48|S|162|5|E|}}) is a [[peak]], 2060 m, just east of [[Borns Glacier]] in the [[Kukri Hills]] of [[Victoria Land]]. Named by the [[Western Journey Party]], led by Taylor, of the [[British Antarctic Expedition]], 1910-13.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Coates, Mount]]

Coats Land[edit]

'''Coats Land''' ({{coor dm|77|0|S|27|30|W|}}) is that part of Antarctica which lies westward of [[Queen Maud Land]] and forms the eastern shore of [[Weddell Sea]], extending in a general northeast-southwest direction between 2000W and 3600W. The northeast part was discovered from the Scotia by [[William S. Bruce]], leader of the [[Scottish National Antarctic Expedition]], 1902-04. He gave the name Coats Land for [[James Coats]], Jr., and Maj. [[Andrew Coats]], the two chief supporters of the expedition. In December 1914 and January 1915, [[Ernest Shackleton]] in the Endurance continued the exploration southward, joining Bruce's discovery to land which [[Wilhelm Filchner]] had discovered from the Deutschland in 1912.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cobalescou Island[edit]

'''Cobalescou Island''' ({{coor dm|64|11|S|61|39|W|}}) is a small snow-free [[island]] with two rounded summits, lying 1 mile southeast of [[Two Hummock Island]] in the [[Palmer Archipelago]]. Discovered and named by the [[Belgian Antarctic Expedition]] under Gerlache, 1897-99. The established name appears to be a corrupted spelling. The toponym was suggested to Gerlache by [[Emile Racovitza]], Romanian zoologist and botanist of the Belgian Antarctic Expedition, for Romanian scholar [[Grigore Cobalcescu]], a geologist of European repute.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Cobblers Cove[edit]

'''Cobblers Cove''' ({{coor dm|54|16|S|36|18|W|}}) is a small [[cove]] which provides an anchorage 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km) west of the entrance to Godthul, along the north coast of [[South Georgia]]. It was charted and named [[Pleasant Cove]] by DI personnel in 1929, but that name is not known locally. The SGS, 1951-52, reported that this feature is known to whalers and sealers as "[[Skomaker Hullet]]" (cobbler's cove), because it was first entered in thick fog by a Norwegian gunner who had once been a cobbler. An English form of this name has been approved.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cobham Range[edit]

'''Cobham Range''' ({{coor dm|82|18|S|159|0|E|}}) is a range trending in a NW-SE direction for about 20 nautical miles (37 km), standing west of [[Prince Philip Glacier]] in the south part of the [[Churchill Mountains]]. Mapped by the northern party of the [[New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition]] (NZGSAE), 1961-62. Named by the [[New Zealand Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (NZ-APC) for a former [[Governor-General]] of [[New Zealand]], [[Lord Cobham]].

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[[Category:Mountain ranges of Antarctica]]

Coblentz Peak[edit]

'''Coblentz Peak''' ({{coor dm|66|7|S|65|8|W|}}) is a [[peak]] rising at the north side of the head of [[Holtedahl Bay]], on the west coast of [[Graham Land]]. Photographed by [[Hunting Aerosurveys Ltd]]. in 1956-57, and mapped from these photos by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS). Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1959 for [[William W. Coblentz]] of the [[U.S. National Bureau]] of Standards, whose work on the transmissive properties of tinted glass has contributed to the design of satisfactory snow goggles.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Cochran Peak[edit]

'''Cochran Peak''' ({{coor dm|79|39|S|84|39|W|}}) is a sharp [[peak]] rising in the south part of [[Gifford Peaks]], in the [[Heritage Range]], [[Ellsworth Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from ground surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1961-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Henry B. Cochran]], IGY weather central meteorologist at [[Little America V]] in 1958.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Cockburn Island[edit]

'''Cockburn Island''' ({{coor dm|64|12|S|56|51|W|}}) is a circular [[island]] 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) in diameter, consisting of a high plateau with steep slopes surmounted on the northwest side by a pyramidal [[peak]] 450 m high, lying in the northeast entrance to [[Admiralty Sound]], south of the northeast end of [[Antarctic Peninsula]]. Discovered by a British expedition under Ross, 1839-43, who named it for [[Admiral George Cockburn]], [[Royal Navy]], then [[Senior Naval Lord]] of the Admiralty.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Cape Cockburn[edit]

'''Cape Cockburn''' ({{coor dm|64|1|S|62|18|W|}}) is a cape marking the northeast extremity of [[Pasteur Peninsula]] on [[Brabant Island]], in the [[Palmer Archipelago]]. The name appears on a chart based upon a British expedition under Foster, 1828-31, who perhaps gave the name for [[George Cockburn]], British naval officer and Admiral of the Fleet in 1851. The cape was charted by the [[French Antarctic Expedition]] under Charcot, 1903-05.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica|Cockburn, Cape]]

Cockerell Peninsula[edit]

'''Cockerell Peninsula''' ({{coor dm|63|24|S|58|8|W|}}) is an ice-covered, bulb-shaped [[peninsula]] between [[Lafond Bay]] and [[Huon Bay]] on the north coast of [[Trinity Peninsula]]. Discovered by the [[French Antarctic Expedition]], 1837-40, under Captain [[Jules Dumont]] d'Urville. Named in 1977 by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) after [[Sir Christopher]] (Sydney) Cockerell, British pioneer of the hovercraft.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cocks Glacier[edit]

'''Cocks Glacier''' ({{coor dm|78|41|S|162|0|E|}}) is the [[glacier]] draining the southwest face of [[Mount Cocks]] and a considerable area south of the [[mountain]], and entering the [[Skelton Glacier]] opposite the [[Delta Glacier]]. Surveyed in 1957 by the [[New Zealand]] reconnaissance party to the [[Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition]] (1956-58), and named after Mount Cocks.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Mount Cocks[edit]

'''Mount Cocks''' ({{coor dm|78|31|S|162|30|E|}}) is a [[mountain]], 2,440 m, in the south part of the [[Royal Society Range]], standing at the head of [[Koettlitz Glacier]] and forming a part of the divide between the Koettlitz and the lower [[Skelton Glacier]]. Discovered by the ''Discovery'' expedition (1901-04) which named it for [[E.L. Somers Cocks]], then Treasurer of the [[Royal Geographical Society]].

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Cocks, Mount]]

Cockscomb Buttress[edit]

'''Cockscomb Buttress''' ({{coor dm|60|37|S|45|42|W|}}) is a prominent, isolated rock buttress rising to 465 m, standing 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) northwest of [[Echo Mountain]] and overlooking the east side of [[Norway Bight]] on the south coast of [[Coronation Island]], in the [[South Orkney Islands]]. The name, which is descriptive, was given by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) following their survey of 1950.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cockscomb Hill[edit]

'''Cockscomb Hill''' ({{coor dm|62|5|S|58|30|W|}}) is a conspicuous hill shaped like a cockscomb, 140 m high, which rises through the [[glacier]] at the head of [[Mackellar Inlet]] in [[Admiralty Bay]], [[King George Island]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. First surveyed by the [[French Antarctic Expedition]], 1908-10, under Charcot. Named by Lieutenant Commander [[F.W. Hunt]], [[Royal Navy]], following his survey in 1951-52.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Mount Codrington[edit]

'''Mount Codrington''' ({{coor dm|66|18|S|52|52|E|}}) is a prominent [[mountain]], 1,520 m, standing 24 nautical miles (44 km) south-southeast of [[Cape Close]] and 17 nautical miles (31 km) east of [[Johnston Peak]]. Charted in 1930 by the [[British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition]] (BANZARE) under Mawson as being the prominent [[peak]] sighted and so named by [[John Biscoe]] in March 1831.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Codrington, Mount]]

Coffer Island[edit]

'''Coffer Island''' ({{coor dm|60|45|S|45|8|W|}}) is a small [[island]] lying in the entrance to the [[bay]] on the east side of [[Matthews Island]] in the [[Robertson Islands]] group of the [[South Orkney Islands]]. The names "Koffer" and "Kotter" are used for this feature on two manuscript charts based on surveys by Captain [[Petter Sorlle]] during 1912-15. The recommended spelling, the anglicized form of the first of the two names, was used by DI personnel on the [[Discovery II]] who charted these islands in 1933.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Coffin Rock[edit]

'''Coffin Rock''' ({{coor dm|56|41|S|27|11|W|}}) is a rock which lies 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) east-southeast of [[Finger Point]] and 0.25 nautical miles (0.5 km) off the north side of [[Visokoi Island]] in the [[South Sandwich Islands]]. Charted and named in 1930 by DI personnel on the [[Discovery II]].

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Coffin Top[edit]

'''Coffin Top''' ({{coor dm|54|30|S|36|6|W|}}) is a [[mountain]] with a flattened summit (745 m) located 1.4 nautical miles (2.6 km) east-northeast of [[Mount Fagan]] and 1.6 nautical miles (3.0 km) northwest of [[Moltke Harbor]], [[South Georgia]]. The feature was named "[[Sarg-Berg]]" (coffin mountain) by the German group of the [[International Polar Year Expedition]], 1882-83. An English form of the name, Coffin Top, was recommended by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1954.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cohen Glacier[edit]

'''Cohen Glacier''' ({{coor dm|85|12|S|164|15|W|}}) is a small [[glacier]] draining northward from [[Mount Cohen]] of the [[Herbert Range]] to enter [[Strom Glacier]] near the head of [[Ross Ice Shelf]]. Named by the [[Southern Party]] of the [[New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition]] (NZGSAE), 1963-64, in association with Mount Cohen.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Cohen Islands[edit]

'''Cohen Islands''' ({{coor dm|63|18|S|57|52|W|}}) is a cluster of small islands between [[Ponce Island]] and [[Pebbly Mudstone Island]] in the southeast part of [[Duroch Islands]]. The group lies 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km) west-southwest of [[Halpern Point]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Theodore J. Cohen]], field assistant with the University of Wisconsin (USARP) party during geological mapping of this area, 1961-62.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Cohen Nunatak[edit]

'''Cohen Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|85|24|S|136|12|W|}}) is a [[nunatak]] lying 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) west of the lower part of [[Reedy Glacier]] and 7 nautical miles (13 km) east of [[Berry Peaks]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from ground surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-63. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant (jg) [[Harvey A. Cohen]], [[U.S. Navy Reserve]], public affairs officer on the staff of the Commander, [[U.S. Naval Support Force]], Antarctica, in [[Operation Deep Freeze]] 1966 and 1967.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Mount Cohen[edit]

'''Mount Cohen''' ({{coor dm|85|16|S|164|27|W|}}) is a [[peak]], 1,765 m, standing 6 nautical miles (11 km) southwest of [[Mount Betty]] in the [[Herbert Range]], [[Queen Maud Mountains]]. Discovered by [[R. Admiral Byrd]] on several [[Byrd Antarctic Expedition]] plane flights to the Queen Maud Mountains in November 1929, and named by him for [[Emanuel Cohen]] of [[Paramount Pictures]], who assisted in assembling the motion-picture records of the expedition.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Cohen, Mount]]

Cohn Bluff[edit]

'''Cohn Bluff''' ({{coor dm|80|15|S|158|30|E|}}) is a rock bluff (c.400 m) in the south part of [[Britannia Range]]. The bluff marks the south side of the terminus of [[Yancey Glacier]] at the juncture with [[Byrd Glacier]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) in association with Byrd Glacier and Yancey Glacier, after Captain [[J.E. Cohn]], [[U.S. Navy]], captain of USS Yancey, a cargo ship of [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]], 1946-47, led by [[Admiral Byrd]].

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Coker Ice Rise[edit]

'''Coker Ice Rise''' ({{coor dm|69|4|S|67|8|W|}}) is a small ice rise in [[Wordie Ice Shelf]], 6 nautical miles (11 km) west-northwest of [[Triune Peaks]], [[Fallieres Coast]]. Photographed from the air by the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE), 1947-48, and surveyed by [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS), 1958. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Walter B. Coker]], [[U.S. Navy]], radioman, [[Palmer Station]] winter party, 1969.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Colbeck Archipelago[edit]

'''Colbeck Archipelago''' ({{coor dm|67|26|S|60|58|E|}}) is a numerous small rocky islands centered 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) northwest of [[Byrd Head]], just east of [[Taylor Glacier]]. Discovered in January 1930 and charted in February 1931 by the [[British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition]] (BANZARE) under Mawson. Named by Mawson for [[W.R. Colbeck]], second officer of the expedition ship, Discovery. Norwegian whalers who explored this same area in January 1931 named the group 4 nautical miles (7 km) to the north the [[Thorfinn Islands]]. The name Colbeck has sometimes appeared on charts for this latter group.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Colbeck Basin[edit]

'''Colbeck Basin''' ({{coor dm|77|0|S|159|30|W|}}) is a deep undersea basin of the central Ross shelf named in association with [[Cape Colbeck]]. Name approved 6/88 (ACUF 228).

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Colbeck Bay[edit]

'''Colbeck Bay''' ({{coor dm|71|38|S|170|5|E|}}) is a [[cove]] between Duke of [[York Island]] and [[Cape Klovstad]] in the south part of [[Robertson Bay]], [[Victoria Land]]. First charted by [[British Antarctic Expedition]], 1898-1900, under [[C.E. Borchgrevink]], who named it for Lieutenant [[William Colbeck]], [[Royal Navy Reserve]], magnetic observer of the expedition.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cape Colbeck[edit]

'''Cape Colbeck''' ({{coor dm|77|7|S|158|1|W|}}) is a prominent ice-covered cape which forms the northwest extremity of [[Edward VII Peninsula]] and [[Marie Byrd Land]]. Discovered in January 1902 by the ''Discovery'' expedition and named for Lieutenant [[William Colbeck]], [[Royal Navy Reserve]], who commanded Scott's relief ship, the Morning.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica|Colbeck, Cape]]

Colbert Hills[edit]

'''Colbert Hills''' ({{coor dm|84|12|S|162|35|E|}}) is a line of hills and bluffs, including [[Coalsack Bluff]], lying east of [[Lewis Cliffs]], between [[Law Glacier]] and [[Walcott Neve]]. The hills trend southwest for 16 nautical miles (30 km) from [[Mount Sirius]]. Named for [[Edwin H. Colbert]], curator of vertebrate paleontology at the [[American Museum]] of [[Natural History]], leader of the paleontology team with the [[Ohio State University Geological Expedition]], 1969-70, which discovered Lystrosaurus fossils in these hills. The discovery is one of the truly significant fossil finds, with great implications on calculations concerning Gondwanaland.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Colbert Mountains[edit]

'''Colbert Mountains''' ({{coor dm|70|35|S|70|35|W|}}) is an isolated [[mountain]] mass with several rounded snow-covered summits, the highest 1,500 m, overlooking [[Handel Ice Piedmont]] between Haydn and [[Schubert Inlets]] in the west central part of [[Alexander Island]]. First seen and photographed from a distance by [[Lincoln Ellsworth]] on his trans-Antarctic flight of [[November 23]], [[1935]], and partially mapped from these photos by [[W.L.G. Joerg]]. Resighted and photographed from the air by the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS), 1939-41, and by the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE) 1947-48, under Ronne, who named it for [[R. Admiral Leo O. Colbert]], head of the [[U.S. Coast]] and [[Geodetic Survey]], which furnished equipment for the expedition. Remapped in detail from RARE air photos by Searle of the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) in 1960.

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[[Category:Mountain ranges of Antarctica]]

Mount Colbert[edit]

'''Mount Colbert''' ({{coor dm|86|12|S|153|13|W|}}) is a [[mountain]] rising to 2,580 m, 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) east of [[Mount Borcik]] and 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) south-southwest of [[Mount Stump]] in southeast [[Hays Mountains]], [[Queen Maud Mountains]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) in association with Mount Stump after [[Philip V. Colbert]], geologist, [[Arizona State University]], logistic coordinator and field associate with [[Edmund Stump]] on six [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) expeditions to the [[Transantarctic Mountains]], 1970-71 through 1981-82, including the area of this mountain.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Colbert, Mount]]

Mount Colburn[edit]

'''Mount Colburn''' ({{coor dm|74|25|S|132|33|W|}}) is a [[mountain]], 520 m, rising above the east-central part of [[Shepard Island]], off the coast of [[Marie Byrd Land]]. Mapped from the USS Glacier on [[February 4]], [[1962]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant (j.g.) [[Richard E. Colburn]], [[U.S. Navy]], [[Communications Officer]] on the Glacier.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Colburn, Mount]]

Coldblow Col[edit]

'''Coldblow Col''' ({{coor dm|60|37|S|45|41|W|}}) is a snow-covered col at 300 m elevation, between [[Echo Mountain]] and [[Cragsman Peaks]] on [[Coronation Island]], in the [[South Orkney Islands]]. Surveyed in 1950 by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS). The name derives from the fact that a FIDS party had their tent blown down in a gale when camped on this col in September 1948.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cole Channel[edit]

'''Cole Channel''' ({{coor dm|67|22|S|67|50|W|}}) is a marine channel running north-south between [[Wright Peninsula]], [[Adelaide Island]], and [[Wyatt Island]], [[Laubeuf Fjord]], off [[Loubet Coast]]. Named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1984 after Captain [[Maurice John Cole]], [[Senior Master]] of the [[British Antarctic Survey]] (BAS) ship Bransfield from 1975; previous Antarctic service as officer on [[John Biscoe]] and Shackleton, several seasons, 1960-72.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cole Glacier[edit]

'''Cole Glacier''' ({{coor dm|68|42|S|66|6|W|}}) is a [[glacier]] on the east side of [[Godfrey Upland]], 11 nautical miles (20 km) long, flowing north-northeast into the [[Traffic Circle]], in southern [[Graham Land]]. First seen by [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS) in 1940, but not named. Roughly surveyed by [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) in 1958. Named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) after [[Humphrey Cole]] (about 1530-91), the most famous English instrument maker of Elizabethan times, who pioneered the design of portable navigation instruments and equipped [[Martin Frobisher]]'s expeditions.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Cole Peak[edit]

'''Cole Peak''' ({{coor dm|85|45|S|136|38|W|}}) is a [[peak]], 2,140 m, located 6 nautical miles (11 km) northeast of [[Mount Doumani]] at the north side of [[Watson Escarpment]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from ground surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-63. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Jerry D. Cole]], airman with [[U.S. Navy Squadron VX]]-6 at [[McMurdo Sound]], 1957 and 1960.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Cole Peninsula[edit]

'''Cole Peninsula''' ({{coor dm|66|50|S|64|0|W|}}) is a [[peninsula]], 15 nautical miles (28 km) long in an east-west direction and 8 nautical miles (15 km) wide, lying between Cabinet and [[Mill Inlets]] on the east coast of [[Graham Land]]. It is ice covered except for several rocky spurs which radiate from [[Mount Hayes]]. First sighted and photographed from the air in 1940 by members of [[East Base]] of the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS). During 1947 it was charted by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) and photographed from the air by the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE) under Ronne. Named by Ronne for Rep. [[W. Sterling Cole]] of [[New York]], member of the [[House Naval Affairs Committee]], which assisted in obtaining Congressional support resulting in procurement of a ship for use by the Ronne expedition.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cole Point[edit]

'''Cole Point''' ({{coor dm|74|39|S|127|30|W|}}) is a point at the south end of [[Dean Island]], which lies within the [[Getz Ice Shelf]] just off the coast of [[Marie Byrd Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1959-65. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Lawrence M. Cole]], BU2, U.S. Navy, Builder at [[Byrd Station]], 1969.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Lake Cole[edit]

'''Lake Cole''' ({{coor dm|78|9|S|166|13|E|}}) is an ice-covered [[lake]] 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) long, located south of [[Mount Ewart]] and [[Mount Melania]] on [[Black Island]] in the [[Ross Archipelago]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) (1999) after [[J.W. Cole]], Department of Geology, [[Victoria University]] of Wellington, who, with [[A. Ewart]] (Mount Ewart), investigated the geology of [[Brown Peninsula]], Black Island, and [[Cape Bird]] in the 1964-65 season.

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[[Category:Lakes of Antarctica|Cole, Lake]]

Mount Cole[edit]

'''Mount Cole''' ({{coor dm|84|40|S|177|8|W|}}) is a [[mountain]] over 1,400 m on the west side of [[Shackleton Glacier]], between the mouths of Forman and [[Gerasimou Glaciers]], in the [[Queen Maud Mountains]]. Discovered and photographed by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]], 1946-47. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Nelson R. Cole]], [[Aviation Machinist]]'s Mate with [[U.S. Navy Squadron VX]]-6, who lost his life in a helicopter crash in the [[McMurdo Sound]] area in July 1957.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Cole, Mount]]

Coleman Bluffs[edit]

'''Coleman Bluffs''' ({{coor dm|72|28|S|160|37|E|}}) is a loose chain of rock and ice bluffs that trend generally north-south for 5 nautical miles (9 km), situated near the center of the [[Outback Nunataks]], about 10 nautical miles (18 km) northwest of [[Mount Weihaupt]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1959-64. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Harold L. Coleman]], meteorologist at [[South Pole Station]], 1968.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Coleman Glacier[edit]

'''Coleman Glacier''' ({{coor dm|75|47|S|132|33|W|}}) is a steep, heavily-crevassed [[glacier]] draining westward from [[Mount Andrus]] in the south part of [[Ames Range]], [[Marie Byrd Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1959-65. Named by the [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Master Sergeant Clarence N. Coleman]], USA, member of the [[Army-Navy Trail Party]] that traversed eastward to establish [[Byrd Station]] in 1956.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Coleman Nunatak[edit]

'''Coleman Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|75|19|S|133|39|W|}}) is a [[nunatak]] located near the head of [[Berry Glacier]], 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) south of [[Patton Bluff]] in [[Marie Byrd Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1959-65. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) after [[Richard I. Coleman]], [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) meteorologist at [[Byrd Station]], 1962.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Coleman Peak[edit]

'''Coleman Peak''' ({{coor dm|77|29|S|167|29|E|}}) is a [[peak]] rising to c.1600 m on the northeast slope of [[Mount Erebus]], [[Ross Island]], 3.6 nautical miles (7 km) east of the summit of [[Fang Ridge]]. Named by the [[New Zealand Geographic Board]] (NZGB) (2000) after [[Father Coleman]], a [[New Zealand]] chaplain, who traveled to Antarctica many times with the [[U.S. Antarctic Program]].

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Mount Coleman[edit]

'''Mount Coleman''' ({{coor dm|77|32|S|163|24|E|}}) is a rounded [[mountain]], 1,110 m, standing immediately east of [[Commonwealth Glacier]] at the head of [[New Harbor]] in [[Victoria Land]]. Mapped by the [[British Antarctic Expedition]] under Scott, 1910-13. Named by [[C.S. Wright]], a member of the expedition, for [[Professor Coleman]], geologist, of [[Toronto University]], Canada.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Coleman, Mount]]

Coley Glacier[edit]

'''Coley Glacier''' ({{coor dm|64|9|S|57|14|W|}}) is a [[glacier]], 5 nautical miles (9 km) long, on the east side of [[James Ross Island]]. It flows into Erebus and [[Terror Gulf]] just north of [[Cape Gage]]. Surveyed by [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) in 1945 and 1953. Named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) for [[John A. Coley]] of FIDS, meteorological assistant at [[Hope Bay]] in 1952 and 1953.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Mount Coley[edit]

'''Mount Coley''' ({{coor dm|81|15|S|158|13|E|}}) is a [[mountain]], 2,570 m, standing 3 nautical miles (6 km) south of [[Mount Frost]], in the [[Churchill Mountains]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Commander [[Vernon J. Coley]], commanding officer of [[U.S. Navy Squadron VX]]-6 in Antarctica, 1957-58.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Coley, Mount]]

Mount Collard[edit]

'''Mount Collard''' ({{coor dm|72|38|S|31|7|E|}}) is a [[mountain]] rising to 2,350 m, standing 3.5 nautical miles (6 km) south of [[Mount Perov]] at the southern extremity of the [[Belgica Mountains]]. Discovered by the [[Belgian Antarctic Expedition]], 1957-58, under G. de Gerlache and named by him for [[Leo Collard]], [[Belgian Minister]] of [[Public Instruction]].

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Collard, Mount]]

Colleen Lake[edit]

'''Colleen Lake''' ({{coor dm|78|2|S|163|52|E|}}) is a small meltwater [[lake]] between the lower parts of Joyce and [[Garwood Glaciers]] in [[Victoria Land]]. It was first seen on the ground by U.S. geologist [[Troy L. Pewe]] on [[January 14]], [[1958]]. He gave it the name Colleen because the feature is similar to many of the clear, reflecting lakes in Ireland. Large lake, 1 km by 0.5 km, located 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) east of [[Pewe Peak]] in upper [[Garwood Valley]], Victoria Land. Named by [[New Zealand Geographic Board]] (NZGB) in 1994 for the brown foam which gathers at the west end of the lake. The 1995 BGN decision for [[Foam Lake]] was made in error.

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[[Category:Lakes of Antarctica]]

Collerson Lake[edit]

'''Collerson Lake''' ({{coor dm|68|35|S|78|11|E|}}) is a small, kidney-shaped [[lake]] 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) southwest of [[Club Lake]] in the [[Vestfold Hills]]. A camp was established on the shores of this lake during geological investigations by [[K. Collerson]], geologist at [[Davis Station]] in January 1970, for whom it was named by [[Antarctic Names Committee of Australia]] (ANCA).

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[[Category:Lakes of Antarctica]]

Collier Hills[edit]

'''Collier Hills''' ({{coor dm|79|42|S|83|24|W|}}) is a group of mainly ice free hills located between the mouths of Schanz and [[Driscoll Glaciers]] where the two join [[Union Glacier]], in the [[Heritage Range]], [[Ellsworth Mountains]]. Named by the University of [[Minnesota Ellsworth Mountains Party]], 1962-63, for [[Robert M. Collier]], [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) topographic engineer with the party.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Cape Collier[edit]

'''Cape Collier''' ({{coor dm|70|10|S|61|54|W|}}) is a broad ice-covered cape on the east coast of [[Palmer Land]], about midway between the south end of [[Hearst Island]] and [[Cape Boggs]]. Discovered in 1940 by members of the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS) who explored this coast by land and from the air from [[East Base]]. Named for [[Zadick Collier]], machinist at the East Base.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica|Collier, Cape]]

Collins Bay[edit]

'''Collins Bay''' ({{coor dm|65|21|S|64|4|W|}}) is a [[bay]] lying between [[Deliverance Point]] and [[Cape Perez]] on the west coast of [[Graham Land]]. First charted by the [[Belgian Antarctic Expedition]] under Gerlache, 1897-99. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1959 for [[R. Admiral Kenneth St]].[[B. Collins]], [[Royal Navy]], Hydrographer of the Navy for a number of years beginning in 1955.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Collins Glacier[edit]

'''Collins Glacier''' ({{coor dm|73|41|S|65|55|E|}}) is a [[glacier]] about 11 nautical miles (20 km) wide at its confluence with the [[Mellor Glacier]], which it feeds from the southwest, located north of [[Mount Newton]] in the [[Prince Charles Mountains]]. Mapped by ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) from air photos taken in 1956 and 1960. Named by [[Antarctic Names Committee of Australia]] (ANCA) for [[N.J. Collins]], senior diesel mechanic at [[Mawson Station]], 1960.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Collins Harbor[edit]

'''Collins Harbor''' ({{coor dm|62|11|S|58|51|W|}}) is a [[bay]] indenting the south coast of [[King George Island]] immediately east of [[Fildes Peninsula]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. The name appears on a chart by Scottish geologist [[David Ferguson]], who roughly charted the bay in 1913-14, but may reflect an earlier naming.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Collins Peak[edit]

'''Collins Peak''' ({{coor dm|72|58|S|167|49|E|}}) is a small but noteworthy [[peak]] (1,810 m) at the east side of [[Malta Plateau]], on the end of the ridge overlooking the confluence of the Hand and [[Line Glaciers]], in the [[Victory Mountains]], [[Victoria Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-64. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Eric J. Collins]], biologist at [[Hallett Station]], 1965-66.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Collins Point[edit]

'''Collins Point''' ({{coor dm|63|0|S|60|35|W|}}) is a small but prominent point 0.75 nautical miles (1.4 km) west-southwest of [[Fildes Point]], on the south side of [[Port Foster]], [[Deception Island]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. Charted by a British expedition under Foster, 1828-31. Named by Lieutenant Commander [[D.N. Penfold]], [[Royal Navy]], following his survey of the [[island]] in 1948-49, for Captain [[K. St]].[[B. Collins]], Royal Navy, Superintendent of Charts in the [[Hydrographic Dept]]., Admiralty.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Collins Ridge[edit]

'''Collins Ridge''' ({{coor dm|85|35|S|160|48|W|}}) is a rugged, ice-covered ridge which extends north from [[Mount Behling]] to the [[Bowman Glacier]], where it trends northeast between the confluence of the Bowman and [[Amundsen Glaciers]]. Mapped from ground surveys and air photos by the [[Byrd Antarctic Expedition]], 1928-30. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Henry C. Collins]], Asst. Chief, Branch of [[Special Maps]], [[U.S. Geological Survey]].

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Collins Rock[edit]

'''Collins Rock''' ({{coor dm|66|17|S|110|33|E|}}) is a low rock at the south side of the entrance to [[McGrady Cove]], [[Newcomb Bay]], on [[Budd Coast]]. First mapped from [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]] aerial photographs taken in February 1947. Surveyed in February 1957 by a party from the USS Glacier. The name was suggested by Lieutenant [[Robert C. Newcomb]], [[U.S. Navy]], navigator of the Glacier, for Engineman 3d [[Class Frederick A. Collins]], U.S. Navy, a member of the survey party.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Mount Collins[edit]

'''Mount Collins''' ({{coor dm|71|30|S|66|41|E|}}) is a flattish, dark-colored rock exposure standing 13 nautical miles (24 km) west of [[Fisher Massif]] in the [[Prince Charles Mountains]]. Discovered in November 1956 by [[Flying Officer John Seaton]], RAAF. Named by [[Antarctic Names Committee of Australia]] (ANCA) for [[P.J. Collins]], senior diesel mechanic at [[Mawson Station]] in 1957.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Collins, Mount]]

Collinson Ridge[edit]

'''Collinson Ridge''' ({{coor dm|85|13|S|175|21|W|}}) is a bare rock spur next north of [[Halfmoon Bluff]] in the northwest part of [[Cumulus Hills]], [[Queen Maud Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] aerial photographs, 1960-64. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Professor [[James W. Collinson]], [[Ohio State University]], a member of the Institute of [[Polar Studies]] geological expedition who worked at this spur in 1970-71.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Mount Colombo[edit]

'''Mount Colombo''' ({{coor dm|76|31|S|144|44|W|}}) is a mountainous projection in the northeast part of the main massif of the [[Fosdick Mountains]], standing 3 nautical miles (6 km) north of [[Mount Richardson]] in the [[Ford Ranges]], [[Marie Byrd Land]]. Discovered by the [[Byrd Antarctic Expedition]] on the [[Eastern Flight]] of [[December 5]], [[1929]]. Named for [[Louis P. Colombo]], a member of the biological party of the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS) which visited this area in December 1940.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Colombo, Mount]]

Colony Cirque[edit]

'''Colony Cirque''' ({{coor dm|77|32|S|163|16|E|}}) is a

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Colorado Glacier[edit]

'''Colorado Glacier''' ({{coor dm|85|53|S|133|5|W|}}) is a tributary [[glacier]], 10 nautical miles (18 km) long, draining northeast from [[Michigan Plateau]] to enter [[Reedy Glacier]] between the [[Quartz Hills]] and [[Eblen Hills]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-64. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for the University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, which has sent a number of research personnel to Antarctica.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Colosseum Cliff[edit]

'''Colosseum Cliff''' ({{coor dm|77|36|S|161|27|E|}}) is an impressive banded cliff located between [[Sykes Glacier]] and the doleritic rock of [[Plane Table]] in the [[Asgard Range]], [[Victoria Land]]. The descriptive name was applied by the [[New Zealand Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (NZ-APC).

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Colosseum Ridge[edit]

'''Colosseum Ridge''' ({{coor dm|79|47|S|156|20|E|}}) is a ridge between [[Haskell Ridge]] and [[Richardson Hill]] in the [[Darwin Mountains]]. The ridge contains pyramidal peaks and five large cirques, the appearance of the latter bearing a resemblance to the Colosseum in Rome. Mapped and named by the [[Victoria University of Wellington Antarctic Expedition]] (VUWAE) (1962-63).

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

The Colosseum[edit]

'''The Colosseum''' ({{coor dm|79|47|S|156|25|E|}}) is a steep sided, moraine floored cirque on the east side of [[Colosseum Ridge]], [[Darwin Mountains]]. The large well formed amphitheater is near the head of the [[glacier]]-filled enclave west of [[Richardson Hill]]. So named because this cirque and four others on the ridge bear a striking resemblance to the Colosseum in Rome.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica|Colosseum, The]]

Coloured Peak[edit]

'''Coloured Peak''' ({{coor dm|85|30|S|156|20|W|}}) is a [[peak]] (660 m) near the head of [[Ross Ice Shelf]] in the coastal foothills of the [[Queen Maud Mountains]], about 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) southeast of O'[[Brien Peak]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-64. The peak was examined by members of [[New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition]] (NZGSAE), 1969-70, and so named because of the colorful yellow, pink and brown banded strata that mark the feature.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Columbia Mountains[edit]

'''Columbia Mountains''' ({{coor dm|70|14|S|63|51|W|}}) is a striking group of largely bare rock peaks, ridges and [[nunatak]]s located near the east margin of the [[Dyer Plateau]], 20 nautical miles (37 km) southeast of the [[Eternity Range]], in [[Palmer Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) in 1974. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) after [[Columbia University]], [[New York City]], which for several seasons in the 1960s and 1970s has sent geologists to study the structure of the [[Scotia Ridge]].

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[[Category:Mountain ranges of Antarctica]]

Column Rock[edit]

'''Column Rock''' ({{coor dm|63|11|S|57|19|W|}}) is a conspicuous rock pinnacle 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) north of [[Gourdin Island]], [[Trinity Peninsula]]. The descriptive name was applied by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC).

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Columnar Valley[edit]

'''Columnar Valley''' ({{coor dm|77|58|S|161|57|E|}}) is a [[valley]] trending northwest between [[The Handle]] and [[Table Mountain]] in the northwest part of [[Royal Society Range]], [[Victoria Land]]. Descriptively named by [[Alan Sherwood]], NZGS field party leader in the area, 1987-88, after the columnar-jointed dolerite that forms the valley walls.

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[[Category:Valleys of Antarctica]]

Colvocoresses Bay[edit]

'''Colvocoresses Bay''' ({{coor dm|66|21|S|114|38|E|}}) is a [[bay]] formed by the right angle of the [[Budd Coast]] at [[Williamson Glacier]]. The bay is over 30 nautical miles (60 km) wide at the entrance and is occupied by [[glacier]] tongues and icebergs from Williamson and [[Whittle Glaciers]]. Delineated by [[G.D. Blodgett]] (1955) from aerial photographs taken by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]] (1946-47). Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[George W. Colvocoresses]], Midshipman on the sloop Vincennes during the [[United States Exploring Expedition]] (1838-42) under [[Charles Wilkes]]. Colvocoresses, later promoted to Captain, [[U.S. Navy]], published (1852-55) his own account of the voyage in [[Four Years]] in the [[Government Exploring Expedition Commanded]] by [[Captain Wilkes]].

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Colwell Massif[edit]

'''Colwell Massif''' ({{coor dm|78|2|S|161|33|E|}}) is a rugged rock massif, about 4 nautical miles (7 km) long, rising to 2,635 m between [[Palais Glacier]], [[Ferrar Glacier]], and [[Rotunda Glacier]], in [[Victoria Land]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) in 1994 after [[Rita R. Colwell]], marine microbiologist who has conducted field research in Antarctica; member of [[National Science Board]] (1983-90) who chaired Presidential committee on [[National Science Foundation]] (NSF) roles in the polar regions; from 1991, President, [[Maryland Biotechnology Institute]], University of Maryland.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Mount Coman[edit]

'''Mount Coman''' ({{coor dm|73|49|S|64|18|W|}}) is a prominent isolated [[mountain]] which rises above the ice-covered plateau of [[Palmer Land]], located just westward of the [[Playfair Mountains]]. Discovered by the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE), 1947-48, under Ronne, who named this mountain for Dr. [[F. Dana Coman]], physician with the [[Byrd Antarctic Expedition]] of 1928-30.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Coman, Mount]]

Comb Ridge[edit]

'''Comb Ridge''' ({{coor dm|63|55|S|57|28|W|}}) is a ridge which rises to 105 m and forms the east and major part of the hill at the extremity of [[The Naze]], a [[peninsula]] of northern [[James Ross Island]], lying south of the northeast end of [[Antarctic Peninsula]]. Probably first sighted in 1902 by the [[Swedish Antarctic Expedition]] under Nordenskjold. It was charted and given this descriptive name by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) in 1946.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Comberiate Glacier[edit]

'''Comberiate Glacier''' ({{coor dm|78|21|S|162|14|E|}}) is a named after [[Michael A. Comberiate]], who was instrumental in developing a system for satellite communications to and within Antarctica, the [[South Pole Satellite Data Link]] (SPSDL).

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Mount Combs[edit]

'''Mount Combs''' ({{coor dm|73|29|S|79|9|W|}}) is an isolated [[mountain]] rising above the ice surface at the base of [[Rydberg Peninsula]], [[Ellsworth Land]]. Discovered by the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE) (1947-48) under [[Finn Ronne]], who named it for [[Representative J.M. Combs]] of Beaumont, Texas, who did much to gain support for the expedition.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Combs, Mount]]