Wildlife biologist

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A wildlife biologist studies animals and their behavior along with the role each animal plays in its natural habitat. The duties of a wildlife biologist can include: developing and conducting experiments/studies on animals in their natural habitats, studying the characteristics of animals such as their interaction with different species, their reproductive and movement patterns, the dynamic with in a population, and the transmission of diseases. Wildlife biologists can also play important roles in managing and monitoring population dynamics to preserve certain species and/or environments.[1] They observe how animals interact with one another as well as how they interact with humans. Some wildlife biologists study the impacts of human interference on an ecosystem. [2] Wildlife biologists can work with endangered species, advocate for preservation of wildlife, resolve issues pertaining to wildlife, and manage animal populations. [3]

Education[edit]

Educational requirements for wildlife biologists typically include tertiary education, such as a Bachelor's degree in wildlife biology, zoology, wildlife ecology, or general biology.[4] Many universities offer specialist degrees or courses in wildlife biology[5]. Career progression into research or university-based roles will usually require relevant doctoral qualifications[6].

Annual Pay[edit]

In the United States, the average pay for a wildlife biologist is $62,290 per year or $29.95 per hour. The top 10% of wildlife biologists can earn up to $99,700 a year. According to the US Department of Labor, employment of wildlife biologists and zoologists is predicted to increase by 8% between 2016 to 2026, which is similar to the projected rate of increase in other occupations.[7]


Specialized wildlife biologist[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Zoologist or Wildlife Biologist". Truity. 2013-12-26. Retrieved 2019-05-09.
  2. ^ "How to Become a Wildlife Biologist | EnvironmentalScience.org". Retrieved 2019-04-16.
  3. ^ "How to Become a Wildlife Biologist | EnvironmentalScience.org". Retrieved 2019-04-16.
  4. ^ Kramer, Mary Hope. "Wildlife Biologist Job Description: Salary, Skills, & More". The Balance Careers. Retrieved 2019-05-10.
  5. ^ "Wildlife biologist and zoologist | Purdue University". Retrieved 2019-08-11.
  6. ^ "How to Become a Wildlife Biologist | GameWarden.org". Retrieved 2019-05-10.
  7. ^ "Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists : Occupational Outlook Handbook: : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics". www.bls.gov. Retrieved 2019-05-10.