Will Sharpe

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Will Sharpe
Born William Tomomori Fukuda Sharpe
(1986-09-22) 22 September 1986 (age 30)
Camden,[citation needed] London, England
Occupation Actor, writer, director
Years active 1998-present

William Tomomori Fukuda "Will" Sharpe (born 22 September 1986) is an English-Japanese actor, writer and director.

Background[edit]

Sharpe read Classics at the University of Cambridge, where he was the president of the Footlights Revue. He graduated in 2008 and joined the Royal Shakespeare Company for their 2008/2009 season. Sharpe spent a year at the RSC and appeared in such plays as The Taming of the Shrew, The Merchant of Venice and The Tragedy of Thomas Hobbes, in which he played a young Isaac Newton. He played the character of Yuki Reid in BBC medical drama Casualty.

In 2009, he directed and co-wrote, along with his friend Tom Kingsley, a short film Cockroach. The pair's first feature-length film, Black Pond, starring Chris Langham, was shown at The Prince Charles Cinema from November 2011.[1][2] Shortly after, he was co-nominated for a BAFTA Award for Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer for the film.[3]

Filmography[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
2016 Flowers Shun TV series - Actor, Writer, Director
2016 The Darkest Universe Zac Feature Film - Actor, Writer, Director
2012 Dirk Gently David Cho TV series - Episode 2
2012 Sherlock Lyons The Hounds of Baskerville
2011 Black Pond Tim Feature Film
2011 Sirens Student Channel 4 Comedy Drama
2009 Casualty Yuki Reid 2009-2011
Cockroach Kiyoshi Writer, director
2008 The Wrong Door Various Three episodes
2008 Never Mind the Buzzcocks Writer

References[edit]

  1. ^ Macnab, Geoffrey (2011-10-03). "First Night: Black Pond, Raindance Festival, London". The Independent. Retrieved 7 October 2011. 
  2. ^ Aitkenhead, Decca (2011-09-26). "Chris Langham: 'Everyone wants to see me working again, but nobody wants to hire me'". The Guardian. Retrieved 26 September 2011. 
  3. ^ Brown, Maggie (23 April 2016). "Unknown writer gets his big TV break with dark English comedy". The Guardian. Retrieved 25 April 2016. 

External links[edit]