Willard, Ohio

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Willard, Ohio
Aerial view of Willard, September 2012
Aerial view of Willard, September 2012
Etymology: Daniel Willard
Nickname(s): 
"The City of Blossoms"
Location of Willard, Ohio
Location of Willard, Ohio
Location of Willard in Huron County
Location of Willard in Huron County
Coordinates: 41°3′17″N 82°43′41″W / 41.05472°N 82.72806°W / 41.05472; -82.72806Coordinates: 41°3′17″N 82°43′41″W / 41.05472°N 82.72806°W / 41.05472; -82.72806
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyHuron
Town founded1874 (as Chicago)
Town incorporated1882 (as Chicago Junction)
City incorporated1960 (as Willard)
Government
 • TypeCouncil/Manager
 • City ManagerJames Ludban
Area
 • Total3.57 sq mi (9.25 km2)
 • Land3.55 sq mi (9.19 km2)
 • Water0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation928 ft (283 m)
Population
 • Total6,236
 • Estimate 
(2018[4])
6,044
 • Density1,756.6/sq mi (678.2/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP codes
44888, 44890
Area code(s)419
FIPS code39-85232[5]
GNIS feature ID1058142[2]
Websitewww.willardohio.us

Willard is a city in southwestern Huron County, Ohio, United States, approximately 14 miles (23 km) southwest of Norwalk. The population was 6,236 at the 2010 census.

History[edit]

The original name of Willard was Chicago,[2][6][7] named for the junction of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's line to Sandusky (the Sandusky, Mansfield and Newark Railroad) and the branch west to Chicago (the Baltimore and Ohio and Chicago Railroad). Later the Akron and Chicago Junction Railroad was built east from the junction, providing a more direct route between the Northeastern United States and Chicago.

With the name "Chicago", passengers would mistake the community for Chicago, Illinois, so they changed the name to Chicago Junction,[7] however, the word "junction" did not fit on boards at the time so it did not fix the problem. In 1917, to finally rectify the confusion, the town changed its name to Willard, after the then president of the B&O, Daniel Willard. Willard officially became a city in the year of 1960[6]

Geography[edit]

Willard is located at 41°3′17″N 82°43′41″W / 41.05472°N 82.72806°W / 41.05472; -82.72806 (41.054649, -82.727982).[8]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.57 square miles (9.25 km2), of which 3.55 square miles (9.19 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[1]

To the south of Willard are located the unincorporated communities of Celeryville and New Haven, plus the planned development of Holiday Lakes to the north.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880662
18901,29996.2%
19002,34880.8%
19102,95025.6%
19203,88931.8%
19304,51416.1%
19404,261−5.6%
19504,74411.3%
19605,45715.0%
19705,5101.0%
19805,7203.8%
19906,2108.6%
20006,8069.6%
20106,236−8.4%
Est. 20186,044[4]−3.1%
Sources:[9][10][11][5][12]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 6,236 people, 2,365 households, and 1,585 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,756.6 inhabitants per square mile (678.2/km2). There were 2,687 housing units at an average density of 756.9 per square mile (292.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.0% White, 1.8% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 5.6% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 18.9% of the population.

There were 2,365 households of which 37.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.1% were married couples living together, 17.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.0% were non-families. 28.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.15.

The median age in the city was 34.6 years. 28.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.8% were from 25 to 44; 23.7% were from 45 to 64; and 13.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48% male, 52% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 6,806 people, 2,545 households, and 1,738 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,963.0 people per square mile (757.3/km²). There were 2,715 housing units at an average density of 783.1 per square mile (302.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 90.32% White, 1.54% African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.31% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 6.11% from other races, and 1.51% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.47% of the population.

There were 2,545 households out of which 38.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.1% were married couples living together, 14.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.7% were non-families. 27.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.22.

In the city the population was spread out with 30.8% under the age of 18, 9.8% from 18 to 24, 27.8% from 25 to 44, 19.4% from 45 to 64, and 12.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $28,911, and the median income for a family was $35,271. Males had a median income of $30,377 versus $22,702 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,942. About 12.7% of families and 16.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.9% of those under age 18 and 9.5% of those age 65 or over.

Economy[edit]

Daniel Willard, the namesake of the city of Willard, c1920s

Several key businesses have a presence in Willard, including the Willard Rail Yard of CSX Transportation, Midwest Industries, LSC Communications (formerly known as RR Donnelley), Pepperidge Farm, and Mercy Hospital of Willard. Farmland surrounds the community, with the primary crops being soybeans, wheat, onions, radishes, lettuce, and sweet corn.[citation needed]

Education[edit]

Willard City Schools operates Willard High School in the city.[13]

Willard is served by the Willard Memorial Library.[14]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  2. ^ a b c "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  4. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 16, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ a b "City of Willard, Ohio". willardohio.us. City of Willard. Retrieved 2019-09-13.
  7. ^ a b "The History of Willard, Ohio". willardareachamberofcommerce.com. Willard Area Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 2019-09-13. 1874 Town founded – Named Chicago, OH. Chicago Junction was used by B&O railroad and later was used to incorporate the village to ease confusion with Chicago, Ill, for the mail service.
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  9. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  10. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  11. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  12. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013.
  13. ^ "Homepage". Willard City Schools. Retrieved 26 February 2018.
  14. ^ "Homepage". Huron County Community Library. Retrieved 26 February 2018.

Further reading[edit]

  • Source: <Dush, F. Joseph, History of Willard, Ohio with Pioneer Sketches of New Haven, Greenfield, Norwich and Richmond Townships> *Source: < Baughman, A.J. "History of Huron County, vol I and II>
  • History of Willard. Willard City Official Website. http://www.willardohio.us/

External links[edit]