Willard L. Beaulac

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Willard Leon Beaulac
Willard Beaulac.jpg
Willard Leon Beaulac in Bogota Colombia c. 1949
United States Ambassador to Paraguay
In office
1944–1947
President Franklin D. Roosevelt
Preceded by Wesley Frost
Succeeded by Fletcher Warren
United States Ambassador to Colombia
In office
1947–1951
President Harry S. Truman
Preceded by John C. Wiley
Succeeded by Capus M. Waynick
United States Ambassador to Cuba
In office
1951–1953
President Harry S. Truman
Preceded by Robert Butler
Succeeded by Arthur Gardner
United States Ambassador to Chile
In office
1953–1956
President Dwight D. Eisenhower
Preceded by Claude G. Bowers
Succeeded by Cecil B. Lyon
United States Ambassador to Argentina
In office
1956–1960
President Dwight D. Eisenhower
Preceded by Albert F. Nufer
Succeeded by Roy Richard Rubottom, Jr.
Personal details
Born (1899-07-25)July 25, 1899
Pawtucket, Rhode Island
Died August 25, 1990(1990-08-25) (aged 91)
Washington, District of Columbia
Resting place Sofa
Nationality United States of America
Spouse(s) Catherine Hazel Arrott Greene
Children three daughters, one son
Parents Sylvester Clinton Beaulac
Lena Eleanor Jarvis
Education Brown University (1918)
Georgetown University (1921)
Occupation Diplomat

Willard Leon Beaulac (July 25, 1899 – August 25, 1990) was a United States diplomat. He served as U.S. Ambassador to Paraguay, Colombia, Cuba, Chile and Argentina.[1]

Biography[edit]

He was born on July 25, 1899 in Pawtucket, Rhode Island to Sylvester Clinton Beaulac and Lena Eleanor Jarvis. He attended Brown University before joining the United States Navy in 1918. After his honorable discharge in 1919, he attended the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and graduated in 1921.[1]

He joined the United States Foreign Service in 1921. He received his first ambassadorial appointment to Paraguay in 1944. in 1947 he was named United States Ambassador to Colombia. He married Catherine Hazel Arrott Greene on February 25, 1935.[1]

From 1951 to 1953 he was United States Ambassador to Cuba. In 1953 he succeeded Claude G. Bowers as United States Ambassador to Chile. From 1956 to 1960 he was United States Ambassador to Argentina. Before retiring around 1962 he was the deputy commandant for foreign affairs of the National War College.[1]

He died of Alzheimer's disease on August 25, 1990 in Washington, DC.[1]

Positions[edit]

  • US Ambassador to Argentina (1956–60)
  • US Ambassador to Chile (1953–56)
  • US Ambassador to Cuba (1951–53)
  • US Ambassador to Colombia (1947–51)
  • US Ambassador to Paraguay (1944–47)
  • US State Department Consul General, Madrid (1941–44)
  • US State Department Counsellor, Havana (1940–41)
  • US State Department Assistant Chief, Division of American Republics (1937–40)
  • US State Department Assistant Chief, Division of Latin American Affairs (1934–37)
  • US State Department Second Secretary, San Salvador, El Salvador (1933)
  • US State Department Second Secretary, Managua, Nicaragua (1928–33)
  • US State Department Third Secretary, Port-au-Prince, Haiti (1927–28)
  • US State Department Consul, Arica, Chile (1925–27)
  • US State Department Vice Consul, Puerto Castilla, Honduras (1923–25)
  • US State Department Vice Consul, Tampico, Mexico (1921–23)

Professor[edit]

Works[edit]

  • Career Ambassador, Macmillan, 1951, (memoir)
  • Career Diplomat: A Career in the Foreign Service of the United States (1966)
  • A Diplomat Looks at Aid to Latin America, Southern Illinois University Press, 1970
  • The Fractured Continent. Hoover Press. 1980. ISBN 9780817972516. 
  • Franco: Silent Ally in World War II, Southern Illinois University Press, 1986, ISBN 9780809312542

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Joan Cook (August 28, 1990). "Willard Beaulac, 91, Ambassador To Five Latin American Nations". New York Times. Willard L. Beaulac, a Foreign Service career officer who served as United States ambassador to five Latin American countries in the 1940's and 1950's, died Saturday at his home in Washington. He was 91 years old. Mr. Beaulac died of Alzheimer's disease, his wife, Catherine, said. ... 

External links[edit]

Ambassador and Mrs. Willard L. Beaulac, Havana.
Beaulac in Havana.
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Wesley Frost
United States Ambassador to Paraguay
1944–1947
Succeeded by
Fletcher Warren
Preceded by
John C. Wiley
United States Ambassador to Colombia
1947–1951
Succeeded by
Capus M. Waynick
Preceded by
Robert Butler
United States Ambassador to Cuba
1951–1953
Succeeded by
Arthur Gardner
Preceded by
Claude G. Bowers
United States Ambassador to Chile
1953–1956
Succeeded by
Cecil B. Lyon
Preceded by
Albert F. Nufer
United States Ambassador to Argentina
1956–1960
Succeeded by
Roy Richard Rubottom, Jr.