William A. Sackett

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William A. Sackett
William A. Sackett (New York Congressman).jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 27th district
In office
1849–1853
Preceded by Esbon Blackmar
Succeeded by John J. Taylor
Personal details
Born William Augustus Sackett
(1811-11-18)November 18, 1811
Aurelius, New York
Died September 6, 1895(1895-09-06) (aged 83)
Saratoga Springs, New York
Political party

William Augustus Sackett (November 18, 1811 – September 6, 1895) was a U.S. Representative from New York.

Biography[edit]

Born in Aurelius, near Auburn, New York, Sackett attended private schools and Aurora Academy. He moved to Seneca Falls in 1831.

Sackett studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1834 and commenced practice in Seneca Falls.

He was elected as a Whig to the Thirty-first and Thirty-second Congresses (March 4, 1849 – March 3, 1853). Sackett spoke frequently against the extension of slavery into United States territories, and advocated the immediate admission of California to the Union as a free state.

After leaving Congress he resumed the practice of law in Seneca Falls. He moved to Saratoga Springs in 1857.

During the American Civil War his son William A. Sackett (1838–1864) was Colonel and commander of the 9th New York Cavalry. The younger Sackett was killed at the Battle of Trevilian Station.

Sackett joined the Republican Party at its founding, and was appointed a federal Register in Bankruptcy under the Bankruptcy Act of 1867. Afterwards he was usually referred to as Judge Sackett to recognize the nature of his federal position.

He died in Saratoga Springs on September 6, 1895, and was interred in that town's Greenridge Cemetery.

References[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Esbon Blackmar
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 27th congressional district

1849–1853
Succeeded by
John J. Taylor

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.