Bill Barry (politician)

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Bill Barry
Minister of Health
In office
21 November 1945 – 20 November 1947
Premier John Cain
Preceded by William Haworth
Succeeded by Albert Dunstan
In office
17 December 1952 – 31 March 1955
Preceded by Bill Fulton
Succeeded by Val Doube
Minister of Housing
In office
21 November 1945 – 20 November 1947
Premier John Cain
Preceded by William Haworth
Succeeded by Arthur Warner
Minister of Forests
In office
21 November 1945 – 20 November 1947
Premier John Cain
Preceded by William Everard
Succeeded by Alexander Dennett
Member of the Victorian Legislative Assembly
for Carlton
In office
10 July 1932 – 22 April 1955
Preceded by Robert Solly
Succeeded by Denis Lovegrove
Personal details
Born William Peter Barry
(1899-06-30)30 June 1899
Northcote, Victoria
Died 21 December 1972(1972-12-21) (aged 73)
Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia
Resting place Melbourne General Cemetery
Political party Australian Labor Party
Other political
affiliations
Democratic Labor Party
Australian Labor Party (Anti-Communist)
Spouse(s) Mary Moodie (m. 1926)
Religion Roman Catholic

William Peter (Bill) Barry (30 June 1899 – 21 December 1972) was a Member of the Victorian Legislative Assembly for the Electoral district of Carlton from July 1932 until April 1955. Barry was a member of the Australian Labor Party until March 1955, when he was expelled from the party as part of the Australian Labor Party split of 1955. He became, with Les Coleman in the Victorian Legislative Council, joint leader of the Australian Labor Party (Anti-Communist), a party that in 1957 became the Democratic Labor Party.[1][2]

Barry was educated at St Brigid's School, North Fitzroy, Victoria and at St Georges School, Carlton, Victoria. He was a tobacco worker and union official before entering Parliament. He was considered close to John Wren, the Victorian entrepreneur.[3]

Political career[edit]

The Communist Party opposed Barry at parliamentary elections in the 1940s with some of its leading members, including Ralph Gibson and Dr Gerald O'Dea.[4] Barry was Minister for Transport in the first Cain government in 1943, Minister for Health, for Housing, and for Forests in the second Cain government from 1945–1947, and Minister for Health in the third Cain government from 1952–1955,[5] and also a member of the Melbourne City Council from 1938–1955.

He was expelled from the Labor Party in 1955 and became leader of the Victorian Labor Party (Anti-Communist). He led his group across the floor to support a successful motion of no confidence in John Cain's government. For that perceived act of political treachery, he had thirty pieces of silver thrown at his feet. Noel Counihan's 1955 painting On Parliament Steps, now in the Art Gallery of Ballarat, depicts the incident.[6] Barry was defeated at the election of 1955 by the ALP candidate Denis (Dinny) Lovegrove.[7]

Peter Kavanagh[edit]

Barry's grandson, Peter Kavanagh, was elected to the Victorian Legislative Council for Western Victoria Region in 2006 representing the Democratic Labor Party, but was defeated at the Victorian state election held in November 2010. Kavanagh was the first DLP candidate to be elected to the Victorian Parliament since 1955, when Frank Scully won the Electoral district of Richmond.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Robert Murray (1970), The Split, F.W. Cheshire, Melbourne, page 249.
  2. ^ Ainsley Symons (2012), 'Democratic Labor Party members in the Victorian Parliament of 1955-1958,' in Recorder (Australian Society for the Study of Labour History, Melbourne Branch) No. 275, November, Pages 4-5.
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ John N. Button (2004), 'Carlton Politics,' in Peter Yule (ed.), Carlton. A History, Melbourne University Press, Carlton, Victoria, page 411.
  5. ^ [2]
  6. ^ Bronwyn Watson, "public works", The Weekend Australian, 4–5 May 2013, Review, p. 11
  7. ^ Ross Fitzgerald (2003), The Pope's Battalions. Santamaria, Catholicism and the Labor Split, University of Queensland Press, St Lucia, Queensland, p.148.
Victorian Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
Robert Solly
Member for Carlton
1932–1955
Succeeded by
Denis Lovegrove
Political offices
Preceded by
Albert Bussau
Minister for Transport
1943
Succeeded by
James Kennedy
Preceded by
William Haworth
Minister of Health
1945–1947
Succeeded by
Albert Dunstan
Minister of Housing
1945–1947
Succeeded by
Arthur Warner
Preceded by
William Everard
Minister of Forests
1945–1947
Succeeded by
Alexander Dennett
Preceded by
Bill Fulton
Minister of Health
1952–1955
Succeeded by
Val Doube