William Blaikie

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For the Canadian politician, see Bill Blaikie.

William Blaikie
BornMay 24, 1843
DiedDecember 6, 1904
Residence52 East 21st Street, Gramercy Park, Manhattan, New York City, U.S.
EducationBoston Latin School
Harvard Law School
OccupationLawyer, athlete, author

William Blaikie (May 24, 1843 - December 6, 1904) was an American lawyer, athlete and the author two books about strength training. He was described by The Evening World as "one of the earliest and most vigorous advocates of physical culture" in the United States.[1]

Life[edit]

Blaikie was born on May 24, 1843 in York, New York.[2] He was educated in Boston, where he attended the Boston Latin School.[2] He graduated from Harvard Law School in 1868.[2]

Blaikie worked as a lawyer in New York City.[2] An athlete,[3] he was described by The Evening World as "one of the earliest and most vigorous advocates of physical culture" in the United States.[1] He was a weight lifter, and a long-distance walker.[2] For example, he walked from Boston to New York City in four days and a half.[2] He authored two books about strength training,[2] including How To Get Strong and How To Stay So, first published in 1875.[3] One of his most assiduous readers was Alan Calvert, who went on to found one of the first companies to sell barbells and publish one of the first magazines on strength training in the United States.[4]

With his wife, Blaikie resided at 52 East 21st Street, Gramercy Park, Manhattan.[1] He died of apoplexy on December 6, 1904 in New York City, at 61.[2][5]

Publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Author Athlete Dies Suddenly. William Blaikie, Well-Known Lawyer, Pioneer Advocate of Physical Culture, Stricken with Apoplexy While Asleep. Retired Apparently in Best of Health. Had Written and Lectured on Subject of Athletics and Was Recognized as an Authority--Graduate of Harvard". The Evening World. December 6, 1904. p. 6. Retrieved January 3, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "William Blaikie Dead. He Wrote About and Practised Athletic Training With Success". The New York Times. December 7, 1904. p. 9. Retrieved January 3, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ a b "Well-Known Athlete Dead". Star-Gazette. December 10, 1904. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  4. ^ Beckwith, Kimberly; Todd, Jan (August 2005). "Strength, America's First Muscle Magazine: 1914-1935". Iron Game History: The Journal of Physical Culture. 9 (1): 11–28.
  5. ^ "William Blaikie Dead". The Bourbon News. December 9, 1904. p. 8. Retrieved January 3, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.

External links[edit]