William Coles (botanist)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from William Cole (botanist))
Jump to: navigation, search

William Coles (1626–1662), botanist, also known as William Cole, was born in 1626 at Adderbury, Oxfordshire, being the son of John Cole.[1] He is known for the doctrine of signatures of medicinal herbs or 'simples', whereby the plant has some attribute which shows the botanist what its use may be.

Biography[edit]

He entered New College, Oxford, in 1642, and was soon after made a postmaster of Merton College, Oxford by his mother's brother, John French, senior fellow and registrar of the university. He graduated B.A. on 18 February 1650, having become a public notary, and having already devoted much attention to botany. He afterwards resided at Putney, 'where he became the most famous simpler or herbalist of his time ' (Athenæ Oxon.) He became B.D. and fellow of New College and in 1660 was made secretary to Brian Duppa, bishop of Winchester, in whose service he died in 1662.[1]

Works[edit]

His works are:[1]

1. The Art of Simpling, or an Introduction to the Knowledge and Gathering of Plants, London, 1656, pp. 123, 12mo, with which was bound the next book, 2. Perspicillum Microcosmologicum, or a Prospective for the Discovery of the Lesser World. Wherein Man is in a Compendium, theologically, philosophically, and anatomically described, and compared with the Universe.

3. Adam in Eden, or Nature's Paradise. The History of Plants, Herbs, Flowers, with their several, . . names, whether Greek, Latin, or English, and . . . vertues, London, 1657, pp. 629, folio.

His name, given by Wood, Rose, and others as Cole, appears as Coles on the title-pages of both his works.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Boulger, George Simonds (1885–1900). Dictionary of National Biography. pp. Volume 11.