William Donthorne

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Aylsham workhouse, south elevation

William John Donthorn (1799–1859) was a notable early 19th-century English architect, and one of the founders of what became the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA).

He was born in Swaffham, Norfolk and a pupil of Sir Jeffry Wyattville. He worked both in the Gothic and Classical styles, but is perhaps best known for his severe Greek Revival country houses - most of which have been demolished.

In 1834 he was one of several prominent architects to form the Institute of British Architects in London (later RIBA).[1]

A large number of his drawings are in the RIBA drawings collection, now housed at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Works[edit]

Donthorn designed Holy Trinity Church at Upper Dicker in 1843.
Sessions House (1842), Thorpe Road, Peterborough.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Port, M.H. "Founders of the Royal Institute of British Architects (act. 1834–1835)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  2. ^ http://www.scottisharchitects.org.uk/architect_full.php?id=200199 (retrieved Oct 2010)
  3. ^ https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/155845 (retrieved Oct 2010)
  4. ^ http://www.roughwood.net/ChurchAlbum/EastSussex/Hellingly/UpperDickerHolyTrinity2004.htm (retrieved Oct 2010)
  5. ^ http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-138560-the-old-rectory-dummer (retrieved Oct 2010)