William J. Coombs

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William J. Coombs

William Jerome Coombs (December 24, 1833 – January 12, 1922) was a Bourbon Democrat member of the United States House of Representatives from New York.

Born in Jordan, New York, Coombs attended the Jordan Academy there. He moved to New York City in 1850, and in 1855 to Brooklyn. In 1856, he started a business exporting American products, which he did for the next 37 years.

He ran for Congress in 1888, but lost. Coombs ran again in 1890 and was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-second Congress. He ran for reelection in 1892 and won a seat in the Fifty-third Congress. He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1894.

President Grover Cleveland appointed Coombs a director of the Union Pacific Railroad in 1894, with special commission to collect the debts due the United States Government from the various Pacific railroads.

Coombs later served as president of the Manufacturers' Terminal Co., and after that headed the Title Guarantee & Trust Co. of Brooklyn.

In 1904, Coombs became president of the South Brooklyn Savings Institution,[1] in which capacity he served until his death on January 12, 1922, age 88. He was interred in Green-Wood Cemetery.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "South Brooklyn Savings Institution". The Independent. Jul 13, 1914. Retrieved August 21, 2012. 

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
William C. Wallace
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 3rd congressional district

1891–1893
Succeeded by
Joseph C. Hendrix
Preceded by
John M. Clancy
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 4th congressional district

1893–1895
Succeeded by
Israel F. Fischer