William J. Howell

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William Howell
54th Speaker of the Virginia
House of Delegates
Assumed office
January 8, 2003
Preceded by Vance Wilkins
Member of the Virginia House of Delegates
from the 28th district
Assumed office
January 8, 1992
Preceded by Clinton Miller
Member of the Virginia House of Delegates
from the 53rd district
In office
January 13, 1988 – January 8, 1992
Preceded by Tom Moncure
Succeeded by Jim Scott
Personal details
Born William James Howell
(1943-05-08) May 8, 1943 (age 74)
Washington, D.C., U.S.
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Cecelia Joy Stump
Alma mater University of Richmond (B.S.)
University of Virginia (LL.B.)
Signature
Website Official website

William James "Bill" Howell (born May 8, 1943) is an American politician from the Commonwealth of Virginia. He represents Virginia's 28th House of Delegates district and has served as Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates.[1] He also serves as chairman, Virginia Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Commission.[2]

Early life and education[edit]

William James Howell was born on May 8, 1943 in Washington, D.C., the second of four children of William Fayette Howell and the former Eileen Hill. His father, an employee of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, joined the World Bank in 1946, where he served in a number of executive positions until his death in 1964.[3][4] His mother, a native of England and daughter of trade unionist and academic Levi Hill, accompanied her father on a lecture tour of the United States, where she met William.[5]

About a year after Howell's birth, the family moved to Alexandria, Virginia, where he grew up. After graduating from Francis C. Hammond High School in 1960, he studied business administration at the University of Richmond, where he was classmates with Robert S. Jepson, Jr. and Leslie M. Baker, Jr.[6] He attended the University of Virginia School of Law and was admitted to the state bar in 1967.[7][8]

Howell was raised in a civically active family and described both of his parents as "New Deal Democrats." Citing a need to discover his own political philosophy while at college, he spent a summer reading different authors from across the ideological spectrum and was eventually influenced by the conservative ideas of Barry Goldwater and Ronald Reagan.[5][7]

Career[edit]

Legal career and community involvement[edit]

House of Delegates service and speakership[edit]

Howell and U.S. Senator Tim Kaine at Fredericksburg's Slaughter Pen Farm Historic Site in 2013

In 1987, three-term incumbent Republican delegate Thomas M. Moncure Jr. announced that he would not be seeking reelection. Howell ran for the open seat at the urging of state senator John Chichester and easily won the three-way race against Democrat Thomas Savage and Independent Al Fagan.

Personal life[edit]

Howell married Cecelia Joy "Cessie" Stump in 1966. They live in Falmouth in Stafford County, Virginia. The couple had two sons, William Fayette Howell, II and Leland Jack Howell. Howell is a deeply religious Baptist, and, in the 1990s, along with Bob McDonnell, Randy Forbes, and one other delegate, he founded a prayer group and Bible study that meets weekly when the Virginia General Assembly is in session.

Electoral history[edit]

Date Election Candidate Party Votes  %
Virginia House of Delegates, 53rd district
Nov 3, 1987[9] General William J. Howell Republican 7,598 48.51
Thomas Y. Savage Democratic 5,752 36.72
M. Alfred Fagan Independent 2,313 14.77
Write Ins 0 0.00
Tom Moncure did not seek reelection; seat stayed Republican
Nov 7, 1989[10] General William J. Howell Republican 12,964 99.86
Write Ins 18 0.14
Virginia House of Delegates, 28th district
Nov 5, 1991[11] General William J. Howell Republican 7,805 75.24
Marcia J. Preston Democratic 2,568 24.76
Write Ins 0 0.00
Clinton Miller redistricted to 26th district; seat stayed Republican
Nov 2, 1993[12] General William J. Howell Republican 11,904 73.72
Marcia J. Preston Democratic 3,240 20.07
David E. O'Keeffe Independent 1,002 6.21
Write Ins 1 0.01
Nov 7, 1995[13] General William J. Howell Republican 10,518 69.41
M. Alicia Knight Democratic 4,633 30.57
Write Ins 2 0.01
Nov 4, 1997[14] General William J. Howell Republican 15,930 98.24
Write Ins 286 1.76
Nov 2, 1999[15] General William J. Howell Republican 11,587 80.08
Garrett T. Baker Independent 2,839 19.62
Write Ins 44 0.30
Nov 6, 2001[16] General William J. Howell Republican 10,964 63.83
Noreen C. Crowley Democratic 6,196 36.07
Write Ins 17 0.10
Nov 4, 2003[17] General William J. Howell Republican 7,373 96.49
Write Ins 268 3.51
Nov 8, 2005[18] General William J. Howell Republican 14,807 94.64
Write Ins 838 5.36
Nov 6, 2007[19] General William J. Howell Republican 8,726 61.70
Clyde W. Matthews Democratic 4,926 34.83
Craig E. Ennis Independent Greens 457 3.23
Write Ins 33 0.23
Nov 3, 2009[20] General William J. Howell Republican 14,909 74.82
Craig E. Ennis Independent Greens 4,874 24.46
Write Ins 143 0.71
Nov 8, 2011[21] General William J. Howell Republican 9,350 91.77
Write Ins 838 8.22
Nov 5, 2013[22] General William J. Howell Republican 14,998 90.77
Write Ins 1,525 9.23
Nov 3, 2015[23] General William J. Howell Republican 8,060 60.26
Kandy A. Hilliard Democratic 5,272 39.41
Write Ins 44 0.33

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gross, Edie (January 9, 2003). "Quiet Bill Howell becomes Mr. Speaker". The Free Lance-Star. 119 (9). Fredericksburg, VA. p. 1. 
  2. ^ Virginia Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Commission – Annual Report – 2015
  3. ^ https://books.google.com/books?id=Y4VmW98hZy8C&pg=PA43
  4. ^ http://oralhistory.worldbank.org/person/howell-william-f
  5. ^ a b http://www.co-opliving.com/coopliving/issues/2012/January%202012/cover%20story.htm
  6. ^ http://alextimes.com/2009/09/hammond-alums-are-feeling-blue-and-whit/
  7. ^ a b http://www.law.virginia.edu/html/alumni/uvalawyer/sp04/howell.htm
  8. ^ http://www.vsb.org/docs/valawyermagazine/vl0208_law-legis.pdf
  9. ^ "General Election- November 3, 1987". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2017-04-17. 
  10. ^ "General Election- November 7, 1989". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2017-04-17. 
  11. ^ "General Election- November 5, 1991". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2017-04-17. 
  12. ^ "November 2, 1993 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2017-04-17. 
  13. ^ "General Election- November 7, 1995". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2017-04-17. 
  14. ^ "General Election- November 4, 1997". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2017-04-17. 
  15. ^ "Election Results - House of Delegates - Nov 1999 Gen Election". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  16. ^ "General Election- November 6, 2001". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  17. ^ "General Election- November 4, 2003". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  18. ^ "General Election- November 8, 2005". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  19. ^ "November 6, 2007 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  20. ^ "November 2009 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  21. ^ "November 2011 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  22. ^ "November 2013 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2015-01-07. 
  23. ^ "November 2015 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2017-04-17. 

External links[edit]