William Juneau

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William Juneau
Bill Juneau.jpg
Juneau from The Cactus, 1918
Sport(s) Football, basketball, baseball
Biographical details
Born February 24, 1879
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Died October 9, 1949 (aged 70)
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Playing career
Football
1899–1902 Wisconsin
Position(s) End, halfback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1903 Fort Atkinson HS (WI)
1904 Colorado College
1906–1907 South Dakota State
1908–1911 Marquette
1912–1915 Wisconsin
1917–1919 Texas
1920–1922 Kentucky
Basketball
1905–1907 South Dakota State
Baseball
1906–1908 South Dakota State
1913 Wisconsin
Head coaching record
Overall 86–39–10 (college football)
7–5 (basketball)
15–12–1 (baseball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
1 Western (1912)
1 SWC (1918)

William J. Juneau (c. 1879 – October 9, 1949) was an American football player and coach of football, basketball, and baseball.

Biography[edit]

He served as the head football coach at Colorado College (1904), South Dakota State College of Agricultural and Mechanic Arts (1906–1907), Marquette University (1908–1911), the University of Wisconsin–Madison (1912–1915), the University of Texas at Austin (1917–1919), and the University of Kentucky (1920–1922), compiling a career college football record of 86–39–10. Juneau was also the head basketball coach at South Dakota State for two seasons from 1905 to 1907, tallying a mark of 7–5. He coached baseball at South Dakota State in 1906 and 1908 and at Wisconsin in 1913, amassing a career college baseball record of 15–12–1.

Juneau was the grandnephew of Solomon Juneau (1793–1856), a fur trader, land speculator, and politician who helped found the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Juneau played football at Wisconsin as an end and halfback from 1899 to 1902 and captained the Wisconsin Badgers football team in 1902. He began his coaching career in 1903 at Fort Atkinson High School in Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin. Juneau retired from coaching 1923 and entered the real estate business.

He died on October 9, 1949 at the age of 70 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.[1]

Head coaching record[edit]

College football[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Colorado College Tigers (Independent) (1904)
1904 Colorado College 6–3–1
Colorado College: 6–3–1
South Dakota State Jackrabbits (Independent) (1906–1908)
1906 South Dakota State 3–1
1907 South Dakota State 5–2
South Dakota State: 8–3
Marquette Golden Avalanche (Independent) (1909–1911)
1908 Marquette 4–2–1
1909 Marquette 2–2–1
1910 Marquette 6–1–2
1911 Marquette 7–0–2
Marquette: 19–5–6
Wisconsin Badgers (Western Conference) (1912–1915)
1912 Wisconsin 7–0 5–0 1st
1913 Wisconsin 3–3–1 1–2–1 6th
1914 Wisconsin 4–2–1 2–2–1 T–4th
1915 Wisconsin 4–3 2–3 6th
Wisconsin: 18–8–2 10–7–2
Texas Longhorns (Southwest Conference) (1917–1919)
1917 Texas 4–4 2–4 T–5th
1918 Texas 9–0 4–0 T–1st
1919 Texas 6–3 3–2 4th
Texas: 19–7 9–6
Kentucky Wildcats (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1920–1921)
1920 Kentucky 3–4–1 0–3–1 19th
1921 Kentucky 4–3–1 0–2–1 20th
Kentucky Wildcats (Southern Conference) (1922)
1922 Kentucky 6–3 1–2 T–9th
Kentucky: 13–10–2 1–7–2
Total: 86–39–10
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

References[edit]

  1. ^ "William J. Juneau, 70, Ex-football Coach". The New York Times. Associated Press. October 10, 1949. Retrieved December 21, 2010.