William Van Landingham

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William Van Landingham
Pitcher
Born: (1970-07-16) July 16, 1970 (age 46)
Columbia, Tennessee
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 21, 1994, for the San Francisco Giants
Last MLB appearance
July 27, 1997, for the San Francisco Giants
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 27–26
Earned run average 4.54
Strikeouts 300
Teams

William Joseph Van Landingham (born July 16, 1970) is a former pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire Major League career with the San Francisco Giants.

Career[edit]

Van Landingham's rookie season of 1994 was his best, when he posted an 8–2 record with a 3.54 ERA and finished seventh in the balloting for the Rookie of the Year Award. His 1995 season was similar, but as a full-time starting pitcher in 1996 he posted a 9–14 record with a 5.40 ERA. After similar results in the first half of 1997, the Giants released him.

Van Landingham played his final Major League Baseball game on July 27, 1997. After being affiliated with the Angels, Expos, and Brewers in the minor leagues, he moved to Athens, Georgia, to live with his family.

Name length[edit]

Van Landingham was widely considered to have set the record for longest surname in the history of Major League Baseball, at 13 or 14 characters (depending on whether one counts the space), though his record has since been tied or broken (again, depending on the reckoning of the space) by Jarrod Saltalamacchia. When Van Landingham pitched to Todd Hollandsworth in 1995, the two set a record for longest combined pitcher-batter name length (since at least 1957) at 26 letters.[1] On May 29, 1996, Van Landingham started against Jason Isringhausen, then a starter for the New York Mets, tying a record[citation needed] for the longest combined names of two starting pitchers.

Van Landingham also set the record for longest complete name in Major League Baseball at 20 letters. The record has since been tied by Jarrod Saltalamacchia.

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Arnold, Bill, Beyond the Box Score, MLB.com. Published 17 August 2007. Retrieved 27 September 2011.