William Wilkinson (architect)

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For other people named William Wilkinson, see William Wilkinson (disambiguation).
William Wilkinson
Born 1819[1]
Died 1901[1]
Nationality British
Occupation Architect
Practice Wilkinson and Moore (from 1881)
Buildings Randolph Hotel, Oxford; Shelswell Park, Shelswell, Oxfordshire
Projects St Edward's School, Oxford; Norham Manor Estate, Oxford

William Wilkinson (1819–1901) was a British Gothic Revival architect who practised in Oxford, England.

Family[edit]

The Randolph Hotel, Oxford between the Martyrs' Memorial (left) and Taylor Institution (just visible, right)

Wilkinson's father was a builder in Witney in Oxfordshire.[2] William's elder brother George Wilkinson (1814–1890) was also an architect, as were William's nephews C.C. Rolfe (died 1907) and H.W. Moore (1850–1915).[1]

Career[edit]

Most of Wilkinson's buildings are in Oxfordshire. His major works include the Randolph Hotel in Oxford, completed in 1864. He was in partnership with his nephew H.W. Moore[1] from 1881.[3] In his long career Wilkinson had a number of pupils, including H.J. Tollit (1835–1904).[4]

Works[edit]

Churches[edit]

In 1841, at the age of only 22, Wilkinson designed a new Church of England parish church, Holy Trinity at Lew, Oxfordshire.[5] His other work on churches included:

Police buildings[edit]

Former police station in Witney

Wilkinson moved to Oxford in 1856 and succeeded J.C. Buckler as architect to the local police committee.[2] Oxfordshire County Constabulary was formed in 1857, and Wilkinson designed several buildings for the new force.

Houses[edit]

Wilkinson designed Home Farm on the Shirburn Castle estate, built in 1856–57.[16] From 1860 he laid out the Norham Manor estate in north Oxford.[17][18] The estate was slowly developed with large villas, a number of which Wilkinson designed himself.[19] Wilkinson also designed town houses and small country houses elsewhere in Oxfordshire:

23 Cornhill, Banbury

Clergy houses[edit]

A number of the houses that Wilkinson designed were for clergy. Most were for the Church of England, but he also designed a presbytery that was built for the Roman Catholic Church.

Educational establishments[edit]

Wilkinson designed the library for the Oxford Union, built in 1863.[40] He designed a number of schools, of which the largest was St Edward's School, Oxford, whose buildings he completed in phases from 1873 until 1886.[41][42] His other schools include:

Industrial buildings[edit]

Late in his career Wilkinson undertook one industrial commission: a new smith shop and foundry for William Lucy's Eagle Ironworks in Jericho, Oxford. This single-storey building was completed in 1879.[48] It was demolished after Lucy ceased production in England in 2005.[49]

Publications[edit]

  • Wilkinson, William (1875) [1870]. English Country Houses: Sixty-one Views and Plans of Recently Erected Mansions, Private Residences, Parsonage-Houses, Farm-Houses, Lodges, and Cottages; with Sketches of Furniture and Fittings; and a Practical Treatise on House-Building (second ed.). London: James Parker and Co. 

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Brodie et al. 2001, p. 994.
  2. ^ a b Tyack 1998, p. 234.
  3. ^ Tyack 1998, p. 267.
  4. ^ Woolley 2010, p. 71.
  5. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, pp. 682–683.
  6. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 600.
  7. ^ a b Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 846.
  8. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 851.
  9. ^ a b Pevsner & Cherry 1973, p. 306.
  10. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 336.
  11. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 830.
  12. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 857.
  13. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 539.
  14. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 509.
  15. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 572.
  16. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 763.
  17. ^ Tyack 1998, pp. 234–235.
  18. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 317.
  19. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 318.
  20. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 860.
  21. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 313.
  22. ^ Pevsner & Cherry 1973, p. 461.
  23. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 319.
  24. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 618.
  25. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 440.
  26. ^ Pevsner & Cherry 1973, p. 529.
  27. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 847.
  28. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 524.
  29. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 753.
  30. ^ Tyack 1998, p. 323.
  31. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 245.
  32. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 734.
  33. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 525.
  34. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 591.
  35. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 613.
  36. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 821.
  37. ^ Crossley 1983, pp. 159–168.
  38. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, pp. 289, 332.
  39. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 553.
  40. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 273.
  41. ^ Tyack 1998, p. 238.
  42. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 332.
  43. ^ Townley 2004, pp. 254–255.
  44. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 710.
  45. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 510.
  46. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 809.
  47. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner 1974, p. 343.
  48. ^ Woolley 2010, pp. 85, 86.
  49. ^ Woolley 2010, p. 87.

Sources[edit]